VasoActive - Cardiovascular Research

Accessibility links

VasoActive - Cardiovascular Research

Breadcrumbs

VasoActive - Cardiovascular Research Group

Themes:

Cardiovascular diseases are responsible for more deaths than any other cause and contribute substantially to the overall burden of disease worldwide. Furthermore, vascular dysfunction contributes to the physical and cognitive impairments associated with ageing. The USC Cardiovascular Research group has a focus on the mechanisms of vascular function, and the development of natural therapies and exercise interventions. The group form part of the Sunshine Coast Cardiovascular Research Collaborative, which brings together biomedical and clinical researchers in cardiovascular health from USC and the Sunshine Coast Hospital and Health Service.

Theme: Vascular tone and blood flow

Studies focus on determining the mechanisms of cardiovascular function in health, and how these are altered and may be targeted in disease.

Theme leader: Associate Professor Shaun Sandow, PhD

Studies aim to determine some of the ways that cells in arteries communicate with one another and specifically, at how cells control the balance between the way that arteries narrow (constrict) and enlarge (dilate). This balance is referred to as vascular tone and is the main determinant of blood pressure and flow, and thus of cardiovascular disease. Coordination of vascular tone is dependent on signals passing through junctions within and between the cellular layers in arteries. Using anatomical, functional and molecular methods, our studies identify the fundamental pathways that underlie blood flow, and how these may be altered and targeted for correction in disease.

Some current project areas include:

Pregnancy and hypertension: Identifying differences in microdomain signalling mechanisms in the uterine microvasculature of normal compared to pre-eclamptic and gestational hypertensive pregnancies (with UNSW and RHW, Sydney)

Migraine: Familial Hemiplegic Migraine type 2 due to -2 Na+/K+-ATPase mutation 1, 2-Na,K-ATPase and Kir 2.1 expression and their implications for cerebral artery function and migraine etiology (with University of Aarhus, Denmark)

IBD/CD/STC. Purinergic-Pannexin micro domains: Novel therapeutic targets in intestinal inflammatory disorders? (with UNSW, Sydney; RMIT, Melbourne)

Theme: Natural therapies for cardiovascular disease

Our group is investigating medicinal properties of naturally occurring compounds in fish oils and bee products.

Theme leader: Dr Fraser Russell

Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an inflammatory cardiovascular disease that is associated with increased risk of aortic rupture and death. Patients are managed at an early stage of disease with a “wait-and-see” approach, as drug therapies often lack efficacy. We are examining whether the anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving properties of long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFAs) and their metabolites can be exploited to reduce the severity of disease. We are undertaking an efficacy trial in which patients with AAA are randomized to receive LC n-3 PUFA capsules or placebo. The study is investigating the effect of the LC n-3 PUFAs on anti-oxidant enzyme systems within immune cells and the change in concentration of blood biomarkers of AAA in response to treatment.

Our other main research interest is in determining the wound-healing potential of compounds within a resin that is produced by Australian stingless bees. This resin, called cerumen, contains several hundred compounds. Our group is using bioactivity-guided fractionation to identify compounds that are beneficial in a wound-healing setting. It is envisaged that this research may help patients who have chronic wounds that are refractory to standard care therapy.

Projects available:

  • Effect of omega-3 fatty acids on vascular inflammation and oxidative stress in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm

  • Determination of the wound-healing potential of Australian stingless bee cerumen

Theme: Exercise and vascular health

Our research aims to improve the health and function of older adults and patients with cardiovascular disease through experimental investigations of cardiovascular dynamics, studies of novel treatment and exercise rehabilitations strategies, and clinical trials.

Theme leader: Associate Professor Chris Askew

Cardiovascular diseases are responsible for more deaths than any other cause and contribute substantially to the overall burden of disease worldwide. Furthermore, vascular dysfunction contributes to the physical and cognitive impairments associated with ageing.

Some of our current project areas include:

  • Effect of exercise on inflammation and vascular stiffness in people with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)

  • Combining exercise and vascular surgery to improve microvascular function in patients with peripheral arterial disease

  • Understanding the brain blood flow responses to physical and mental challenges in older adults

  • Understanding the impact of corrective surgery on vascular function in children with sleep-disordered breathing

  • The effect of passive therapies (e.g. heating, cold-water immersion, passive movement) on vascular and microcirculation function.

Theme: The Patient Blood Interface

Theme leader: Dr Yoke Lin Fung

Blood performs the essential functions of transport (e.g. oxygen), regulation (e.g. of pH, temperature etc) and is central to the body’s defence mechanism. Hence any quantitative and/or functional defect of the patient’s blood, or in the transfused blood product may compromise patient outcome.

Presently we are investigating how anaemia and bleeding compromises the outcomes of orthopedic patients, and assesing new technologies to promptly diagnose and address these problems. In another study we are investigating the clinical, social and economic impact of subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIg) use in Sunshine Coast Hospital and Health Service.

This team is focussed on translational research relating to the Patient and Blood Interface. To achieve this we are working with the hospital patient blood management committee to support and promote evidence based transfusion medicine practice, and welcome more collaborations in this area.

Back to top

Searching {{model.SearchType}} for "{{model.Query}}" returned more than {{model.MaxResults}} results.
The top {{model.MaxResults}} of {{model.TotalItems}} are shown below, ordered by relevance ({{model.TotalSeconds}} seconds)

Searching {{model.SearchType}} for "{{model.Query}}" returned {{model.TotalItems}} results, ordered by relevance ({{model.TotalSeconds}} seconds)

Searching {{model.SearchType}} for "{{model.Query}}" returned no results.

No search results found for

{{model.ErrorMessage}}