Annual Report 2009 (text-only version)

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Annual Report 2009 (text-only version)

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Report of the Council of the University of the Sunshine Coast

For the period 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2009

10 March 2010

The Hon Geoff Wilson MP
Minister for Education and Training

In accordance with the provisions of the Financial Accountability Act 2009 and the Financial and Performance Management Standard 2009, and the detailed requirements set out in the Annual Report Requirements for Queensland Government Agencies (January 2010), I have the honour to present to you, on behalf of the Council of the University of the Sunshine Coast, the Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2009.

John M Dobson OAM
Chancellor

Acknowledgment of country

The University of the Sunshine Coast acknowledges the Gubbi Gubbi people as the traditional owners and custodians of the land on which the campus stands, and recognises the strength, resilience and capacity of Aboriginal people in this land.

Communication objectives

This annual report meets the reporting requirements of the Queensland Minister for Education and Training.

The University of the Sunshine Coast’s 2009 annual report provides a record of the University’s performance in 2009, its plans for the future, and audited financial statements. All achievements for 2009 are documented against the goals and corresponding key performance indicators of the University’s Strategic Plan 2005–2010.

Potential readers of the annual report include members of state and federal parliament, the University community (including staff and students), business and media, potential benefactors, international visitors and members of the public.

Copies of the 2009 annual report are available from the Administrator, Office of Marketing and Communications, University of the Sunshine Coast, by telephoning +61 7 5459 4558 or faxing +61 7 5430 1187. The report is also available online at www.usc.edu.au/reports.

The University of the Sunshine Coast is committed to providing accessible services to people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. If you have difficulty understanding the annual report, contact the Office of Marketing and Communications on +61 7 5459 4558 to arrange an interpreter to effectively communicate the report to you.

University of the Sunshine Coast 90 Sippy Downs Drive Sippy Downs Qld 4556 Australia

Tel: +61 7 5430 1234 Fax: +61 7 5430 1111 Email: information@usc.edu.au Web: www.usc.edu.au

© University of the Sunshine Coast 2010 ISSN 1837-7521

Published by University of the Sunshine Coast March 2010. Information contained in this publication was correct at the time of publishing. For the most up-to-date information about the University, visit www.usc.edu.au. All amounts are in Australian dollars. University of the Sunshine Coast is registered on the Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students. CRICOS Provider Number: 01595D.

Correction to the 2008 Annual Report

Page 25 of the University’s 2008 annual report incorrectly reported Professor Mary Katsikitis as having been part of a successful ALTC grant application submitted through Southern Cross University. The grant application was unsuccessful.

Standing

On opening in 1996, the University of the Sunshine Coast became the first greenfield university to be established in Australia since 1975.

The University serves the Sunshine Coast and impacts strongly on the economic and cultural development of the region.

USC pursues distinctiveness through long-term strategies focused on two major themes: a commitment to local, national and international engagement and sustainability.

These strategic activities encompass many aspects of university life: an increasing suite of academic teaching and research programs promoting sustainability; pursuing the feasibility of developing an ‘ecoversity’ through its campus enhancement activities; its ‘architectural laboratory’ approach to sub-tropical buildings; its emphasis on sustainability of business through the Innovation Centre; and many other initiatives which are preoccupying an increasing number of staff and students.

Mission

The mission of the University of the Sunshine Coast is: To be the major catalyst for the innovative and sustainable economic, cultural and educational advancement of the region, through the pursuit of international standards in teaching, research and engagement.

Values

In pursuing its mission and conducting daily operations, the University is committed to:

  • the advancement, dissemination and preservation of knowledge through innovative and effective teaching and research of the highest quality;
  • fostering freedom of inquiry and expression; the process of lifelong learning;
  • engaging in and responding to the community’s intellectual, cultural and economic needs; adopting consultative processes and ethical behaviour in all activities;
  • engendering respect among students, staff and Council of the University for their diverse roles and contributions;
  • fairness, openness, honesty, trust and effective communication as fundamental expectations of students, staff and all associated with the University;
  • developing the University and its surrounds as an environmentally sensitive exemplar;
  • and the advancement of human rights within a tolerant and inclusive society, in which respect for Indigenous and international peoples is fundamental.

Table of Contents

Highlights

  • On-campus student enrolments increased by more than 13 percent in 2009, defying softer demand across the sector. First preference applications for Semester 1, 2010 entry increased by 24 percent over 2009.
  • Research income, refereed publications and numbers of graduating research students continued to rise steadily, with researchers securing more than $6.5 million in grants, almost trebling from $2 million in 2007.
  • The significance of blue-fin tuna research undertaken by USC researchers was acknowledged by Time Magazine as the world’s second-most important invention in 2009. Another USC researcher received the highly prestigious Eureka Prize for Science, for research into climate change adaptation.
  • USC received six Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) citations—more per head of staff than any other Australian university.
  • The Good Universities Guide confirmed USC as the only public university in Queensland to obtain 5 stars for the quality of staff teaching.
  • International on-campus enrolments (EFTSL) grew 20 percent, and in 2009, made up approximately 14 percent of total on-campus enrolments (EFTSL). Almost 1,300 international students from more than 60 countries studied at USC during the year.
  • USC’s Global Opportunities (GO) Program received an ALTC Citation and won the Queensland Education and Training International (QETI) Award for best practice in outbound student mobility. USC student and GO Program participant, Rachel McKay, won the QETI award for Queensland Student Ambassador of the Year.
  • Collaboration continued with Queensland Health on the Sunshine Coast University Hospital, while the Translink Bus interchange was opened by Queensland Transport Minister Rachel Nolan.
  • Sunshine Coast Regional Council set aside more than $13 million to accelerate the coordinated development of the Sippy Downs Town Centre, in which the University will play a significant role in attracting businesses to the proposed ‘Technology Hub’.
  • The Innovation Centre, to date, has supported the start-up and growth of more than 55 businesses and created around 400 jobs in sectors such as ICT, clean technology and creative industries, and is attracting the interest of major and national and international companies.
  • USC and its partner institution, the University of Southern Queensland’s Fraser Coast (USQFC) Campus, completed the $900,000 Optimisation Project, designed to identify how USC and USQFC could most effectively assist their regions to meet current and anticipated human capital requirements.
  • A record number of regional organisations (429) took student placements as part of the Work Integrated Learning (WIL) Program.
  • To advance the University’s engagement agenda, the University created the new position of Pro Vice-Chancellor (Regional Engagement) to reinforce the University’s regional role. Another addition to the Chancellery was the appointment of the Chief Financial Officer to the role of Pro Vice-Chancellor (Corporate Services).
  • Community events such as World Environment Day and Festuri (a multicultural celebration) attracted thousands of people to the University’s campus.
  • From 184 competitive applications for Education Investment Funds, the University’s proposed ACTLERNE building was one of only three shortlisted from Queensland.
  • The University’s repositioning advertising campaign, “The best of both worlds”, was highly successful and credible with strong levels of awareness and understanding of the quality education and Sunshine Coast lifestyle message.
  • A market survey of Sunshine Coast school-leavers, parents and school guidance officers showed that of all tertiary options about half of Sunshine Coast schoolleavers seriously considered USC as a study option.
  • USC received the Australasian Reporting Award for ‘Best First Time Entry’ for the University’s 2007 Annual Report, and received a gold award for the same.
  • USC launched its first Reconciliation Action Plan.
  • USC was named as ‘Employer of Choice for Women’ for the fifth successive year.
  • Graduation, attended by 2,600 people, was addressed by Sir Llew Edwards AC. With more than 1,200 awards conferred during the year, USC’s Alumni body was represented by around 7,400 graduates in 2009.
  • Business graduate Jonty Bush was named Young Australian of the Year for 2009. Ms Bush received the award in recognition of her courageous work in leading the Queensland Homicide Victims’ Support Group. Prime Minister Kevin Rudd presented her with her award at the Australia Day celebrations in Canberra.

Key Five Year Figures

Category20052006200720082009Annual % changeTrend
Number of students 1 4,280 4,760 5,246 5,833 6,325 8.4% UP
Female 2,469 2,807 3,163 3,624 4,074 12.4% UP
Male 1,811 1,953 2,083 2,209 2,251 1.9% UP
On-campus students 3,768 4,267 4,750 5,383 6,092 13.2% UP
Undergraduate 3,295 3,494 3,811 4,239 4,827 13.9% UP
Postgraduate coursework 549 773 867 904 732 -19.0% DOWN
Higher degree by research 72 71 100 118 129 9.3% UP
Non-award 365 427 469 573 638 11.3% UP
International (all students) 694 730 855 977 880 -9.9% DOWN
International (on campus) 362 414 527 674 766 13.6% UP
Student load (EFTSL) 2 3,291.7 3,745.8 4,131.4 4,597.3 5,328.9 15.9% UP
Degrees conferred              
Undergraduate 481 535 592 591 656 11.0% UP
Postgraduate coursework 303 313 492 654 569 -13.0% DOWN
Higher degree by research 5 9 13 11 12 9.1% UP
Total 789 857 1,097 1,256 1,237 -1.5% DOWN
Equity              
Disability 3 4.10% 4.12% 3.80% 3.52% 4.66% 1.1% UP
Indigenous 3 1.42% 1.19% 1.50% 1.63% 1.84% 0.2% UP
First in family to attend university 4 53% 52% 52% 52% 51% -1.0% DOWN
Number of staff (full-time equivalent)              
Academic 5 105 123 144 173 188 8.1% UP
Non-academic 6 223 242 280 295 329 11.5% UP
Total 328 365 423 468 517 10.5% UP
Proportion of academic staff with higher degree qualifications 88% 87% 85% 83% 77% -6.0% DOWN
Operating revenue (parent entity) $50.60M $66.80M $78.40M $95.50M $109.04M 14.2% UP
Research income 7 $1.69M $1.97M $2.99M $3.35M 8 $4.75M 41.8% UP
Research publications 9 87.57 119.32 120.96 196.74 NA8 - -
Property, plant and equipment $97.10M $126.80M $146.55M $165.25M $169.40M 2.5% UP
  1. Number of students is as at Census, Semester 1, each year.
  2. Student load includes inbound exchange students.
  3. Disability and Indigenous percentages are as a proportion of domestic students only.
  4. First in family percentages are as a proportion of undergraduate students only.
  5. Academic (Vice-Chancellor; Deputy Vice-Chancellor; Teaching and Research (Level A-E) staff).
  6. Non-academic (Administrative, Professional and Technical (APT) Level 1–10 staff; APT staff above award).
  7. Figures include research income reported to the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research (DIISR) through the Higher Education Research Data Collection (HERDC), as well as research funding received from DIISR.
  8. Higher Education Research Data Collection (HERDC) figure for the previous year is not finalised until June of the following year.
  9. Weighted calculation reported to the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research (DIISR) in the Higher Education Research Data Collection (HERDC).

Institutional forward planning for 2010

  • Continue the growth in undergraduate and postgraduate domestic students, as well as moving forward toward 25% international students as a proportion of total load.
  • Build research centres to hub status.
  • Concertedly advance strategies that address the national social inclusion and quality agendas.
  • Finalise strategies to obtain monies for key capital infrastructure projects.
  • Progress, in cooperation with Sunshine Coast Regional Council, the complementary development of the Innovation Centre with the technology precinct within the Sippy Downs Town Centre, to create a unique University Town with a strong emphasis on new economy jobs.
  • Contribute to evolving plans for Sunshine Coast University Hospital.

Vice-Chancellor’s Review

2009 has seen the momentum of development gather further pace. There was substantial growth in student and staff numbers, in the enhancement and recognition of research capacity, in the awards and acknowledgements for outstanding teaching, in the success rate of the Innovation Centre in generating business, in growing numbers of international students, and in the University’s influence generally on regional development issues.

The University has become a major catalyst for the advancement of the Sunshine Coast and is widely recognised and supported to continue that role, evidenced by the recent successful $5 million fundraising campaign. The University and the community are symbiotically linked.

Sectorally, too, the University is gaining wider recognition for its remarkable progress across its early years, and is clearly emerging as one of the strongest regional universities of the 21st Century, with growth in excess of 10 percent every year since opening in 1996.

Despite the pace of growth there is overwhelming evidence of quality, for example, in the level of personal and academic support extended to students, who subsequently register high satisfaction on their experiences at USC.

The University has also catalysed the physical growth of the surrounding Sippy Downs community, and a new contiguous town centre will soon emerge to provide new social, cultural and economic opportunities. It has the potential to become a world-class university town, strongly supported by governments, and will provide overdue nearby infrastructure for staff and students.

The greatest challenge for USC is unquestionably gaining support funding for capital development. As one of Australia’s fastest-growing universities, it is also the youngest public university, and remains highly reliant on Federal Government funding. The University needs further major buildings to house its increasingly complex range of research and teaching, and considerable attention was paid to seeking major capital grants in 2009.

If the Government’s ‘social inclusion’ agenda is to be realised, then securing major grants to house the continuing expansion will be an imperative. It is at universities like USC where the Government has the greatest opportunities for expanding the numbers of socially disadvantaged students participating in higher education.

It will be important to see new government sources of funds for regions directed to high growth universities like USC, where demand for 2010, for example, is projected to increase beyond 20 percent on 2009 numbers. Further capital funding for buildings of scale is becoming an urgent priority.

As the courses in health and nursing are expanded to meet the demands of Queensland Health’s Sunshine Coast University Hospital, then the pressures for physical growth will further intensify.

So much that is of qualitative value on the Sunshine Coast, economically, culturally, intellectually and environmentally, is dependent on the continued growth and development of this University, as it steers a course to play a major part in the new sectoral environment which transitions in 2011 and becomes fully operational in 2012.

Professor Paul Thomas AM
Vice-Chancellor and President

March 2010

Financial Review

The University’s financial position has continued to strengthen this year as a result of increased student load, and reductions in expenditure. Results for the year included an operating surplus of $17.47 million, with an operating margin of 16 percent.

Income and expenditure

Total income for the year was $109.04 million—an increase of $14.03 million (15 percent) on the previous year. The increase was driven primarily by continued growth in Commonwealth-funded student places, and fee- paying international students.

Funds derived from government sources totalled $82.94 million or 76 percent of revenue, an increase of $13.47 million (19 percent) on the previous year’s funding.

Expenses for the year totalled $91.57 million—an increase of $10.18 million (13 percent) received in the previous year.

This increase can be attributed to an 11 percent ($5.48 million) increase in employee benefits, due to the four percent administrative wage increase in March 2009; increase in provisioning for long service leave due to an ageing of the workforce; and increase in staff positions due to increased student load.

A number of buildings and infrastructure projects were capitalised in 2008, resulting in the first complete year of depreciation being recorded in 2009.

Asset growth

At year’s end, the University’s net assets totalled $165.03 million—$24.63 million (18 percent) more than in the previous year. This reflected the re-valuation of existing buildings and the accumulation of cash reserves for future years’ capital expenditure.

Consultancies

Expenditure on consultancies
Category2008 ($)2009 ($)
Professional / Technical 1,635,055 1,973,408
Communications 0 1,100
Finance / Accounting 0 58,255
Information technology 215,229 398,097
Human resource management 51,248 1,727
Management 197,109 130,478
General 52,659 48,620
Total 2,151,300 2,611,685

Organisation

Basis of authority

The institution was established under the Sunshine Coast University College Act 1994 and took its first students in 1996. Full university powers were granted under the University of the Sunshine Coast Act 1998.

Functions and powers

The University’s functions are to:

  • provide education at university standard; provide facilities for, and encourage, study and research;
  • encourage the advancement and development of knowledge, and its application to government, industry, commerce and the community;
  • provide courses of study or instruction, at levels of achievement the Council considers appropriate, to meet the needs of the community; confer higher education awards;
  • disseminate knowledge and promote scholarship;
  • provide facilities and resources for the wellbeing of the University’s staff, students and other persons undertaking courses at the University;
  • exploit commercially, for the University’s benefit, a facility or resource of the University, including, for example, study, research or knowledge, or the practical application of study, research or knowledge, belonging to the University, whether alone or with someone else;
  • and perform other functions given to the University under the Act or another Act.

The University’s powers are:

  1. Under the University of the Sunshine Coast Act 1998 the University has all the powers of an individual. It may, for example:
    1. enter into contracts;
    2. acquire, hold, dispose of, and deal with property;
    3. appoint agents and attorneys;
    4. engage consultants;
    5. fix charges, and other terms, for services and other facilities it supplies; and
    6. do anything else necessary or convenient to be done for its functions.
  2. Without limiting subsection (1), the University has the powers given to it under its Act or another Act.
  3. The University may exercise its powers inside and outside Queensland.
  4. Without limiting subsection (3), the University may exercise its powers outside Australia.

Strategic framework

The imperative of a changing policy environment and increasing national and international competition requires that the University energetically pursue its distinctiveness through a long-term strategic approach built around two major themes:

  • regional engagement
  • sustainability
Regional engagement

The University has earned an international reputation for implementing the engagement emphasis of its mission. Engagement has been at local, national and international levels, and is manifest across the spectrum of University activities. The University is intent on developing its symbiotic relationship with the regional community as a springboard for wider national and international engagement.

Sustainability

Concepts of sustainability drove the way in which the University was conceived and developed, including through sustainable master planning, sub-tropical architectural design, and academic teaching and research related to the sustainable development of the Sunshine Coast region.

The concept is now much wider, and encompasses every aspect of human life—social inclusion, energy for the future, the effective and equitable use of natural resources, preservation of built and natural environments, preservation of cultural and social heritages, and the development of sustainable economic opportunities.

Planning for the future

The Strategic Plan is the University’s highest-level planning document, along with the Master Plan.

Functional Plans apply University-wide and drive resource allocations through the budget process, complementing the Strategic Plan.

Operational Plans for individual cost centres support initiatives outlined in both the Strategic and Functional Plans.

All plans are reviewed and updated during the budget and planning process in September each year. The Strategic Plan is due for review in 2010.

Annual review of operations

As a review of its operations each year, the University of the Sunshine Coast measures its progress according to the goals and key performance indicators for eight areas, as outlined by the Strategic Plan (2005-2010):

GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT REVIEW

GOAL To promote growth to enhance quality and efficiency, whilst retaining important benefits of human scale

2009 saw growth in...

Students

A record intake in 2009 of 2,713 new students pushed the University’s student population to 6,325 by Semester 1 census. The intake was a nine percent increase on Semester 1, 2008. The success in student growth carried into mid-year—the Semester 2, 2009 intake was the largest ever, with more than 1,500 new students enrolled by the census date.

Student growth in 2010 is assured. As at 21 December, QTAC first preferences for study at the University in 2010 had increased by 24 percent over the previous year (compared to a Queensland institutional average of 17 percent growth). The total number of preferences for USC increased by 20 percent, from 7,226 to 8,702, over the same period, indicating strong overall interest in USC programs.

Alumni

The USC Alumni swelled to a total of 7,439 during 2009. At the annual Graduation ceremony on April 17, the Chancellor conferred the largest number of undergraduate awards (621) in USC’s history, and more than 1,200 awards in total.

The University’s first graduates were welcomed back to campus in October, with the 1999 Alumni Reunion.

High-achieving alumni were honoured by the Chancellor in September. The Outstanding Alumni of the Year Awards recognised three USC Alumni for their significant achievements in their fields of endeavour: 2009 Young Australian of the Year Jonty Bush (pictured below), for her work with the Queensland Homicide Victim’s Support Group; Sunshine Coast Regional Councillor Keryn Jones, for her environmental efforts; and Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine’s senior forensic technician Emily Orchard, for her work in identifying victims of the Victorian bushfires.

Programs

Nursing science was the most popular program at USC in 2009, with more than 200 new students enrolled in the program. The popularity of nursing in 2010 may be contested by the new Bachelor of Education (Primary). Developed to meet regional demand for primary educators, the program attracted strong interest from QTAC applicants in late 2009, for its first cohort of students in 2010.

The top ten undergraduate programs in 2009:

  1. Bachelor of Nursing Science
  2. Bachelor of Arts
  3. Bachelor of Education/Bachelor of Arts
  4. Bachelor of Business (Accounting)
  5. Bachelor of Education/Bachelor of Science
  6. Bachelor of Social Science (Psychology)
  7. Bachelor of Business
  8. Bachelor of Education (Early Childhood)/Bachelor of Human Services
  9. Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics
  10. Bachelor of Journalism
Revenue

The University’s financial position strengthened in 2009 as a result of increased student load and reductions in expenditure. Results included an operating surplus of $17.47 million, and a 15 percent increase in income to just over $109 million.

The University’s first bequest was received in 2009. The University Foundation staged a ceremony to honour Marjorie Harrold’s bequest, which helped establish a Wildlife Endowment Fund to support the study and monitoring of native wildlife on campus—particularly kangaroos. The event also marked the launch of the University’s new Beyond Today Society, established to recognise those who plan to leave USC a bequest in their wills.

Facilities

A new bus interchange boosted public transport to the campus in 2009. The $5.5 million triple- platform Transit Centre is the second-largest bus interchange on the Sunshine Coast, with the project also including the construction of a ‘green link’ between USC and Scholars Drive, which provides safe and direct access into Chancellor Park for buses, cyclists and pedestrians.

The wireless network expanded to provide more flexible computer access for students across campus. The expansion to five additional locations on campus followed the successful trial of the wireless network for the University Library in 2008. A Sustainability Research Centre evolved in 2009, from the outstanding performance of the Sustainability Research Group in 2008.

Research

The establishment of the centre followed the success of the group in attracting $2 million in competitive research funding in 2008, and the publication of more than 100 research papers. Key aspects of the centre’s research include coastal management, climate change, water management, natural and cultural heritage, innovation, adaptive growth and community well-being..

Reputation

A new advertising campaign was launched in July, promoting “The best of both worlds”. The campaign was USC’s largest to date, and highlighted how USC students can enjoy the Sunshine Coast lifestyle while gaining qualifications that can take them anywhere in the world. The advertisements also focused on USC’s commitment to sustainability, entrepreneurship, research and global study opportunities.

Awareness and reputation for USC continued to grow during the year. Market research conducted in November showed impressive recall rates of 88.7 percent (Year 12 students), 80 percent (guidance officers) and 60.9 percent (parents) for the new advertising campaign.

Ambitions for future growth

The University aims to continue its record as being Australia’s fastest- growing university, expanding the campus to be home to 15,000 students by 2021.

During 2009, the University submitted two Education Investment Fund (EIF) applications, one of which was selected for further assessment in the second round in 2010.

The proposed Australian Centre for Transformational Learning, Evaluation and Research in Nursing Education (ACTLERNE), pictured below, is a purpose-built facility with the technology, innovative spaces and user-interaction to become a national centre of excellence in producing the next generation of nurses and nursing educators. The estimated cost of the project is $25.7 million, with $25 million sought from the EIF.

Performance against targets

Growth in EFTSL – Commonwealth Grant Scheme and fee-paying

Target: 5,000 EFTSL by 2010
Performance: 5,329 EFTSL in 2009

Target: Meet projected 5-year growth for each year
Performance: 5,637 EFTSL projected for 2010 (within target)

The University’s target of enrolling 5,000 EFTSL by 2010 was achieved one year in advance with 2009 at just over 5,329 EFTSL. This was an increase of 15.9% over 2008.

Strong growth in Commonwealth-supported and on-campus international load contributed to the achievement of this target in 2009.

Commonwealth-supported students continued to account for the majority of EFTSL at 81%, followed by international students at 15% and domestic fee-paying students at 4%.

For Commonwealth-supported students, improved retention rates for continuing students and the largest-ever mid-year intake resulted in an on- campus increase of 18.8% over 2008. International load, particularly Study Abroad and undergraduate award students, increased by 20.5% over 2008. Postgraduate fee-paying load remained at a similar level to 2008.

As part of triennial budget planning through to 2012, the University has taken a reasonably conservative approach in estimating future load. Forecasts indicate that numbers will again grow in 2010 to reach 5,637 EFTSL.

Notes

Achieving DEEWR funded load

Target: Meet DEEWR funded load target for each year
Performance: Surpass DEEWR funded load target of 4,146 EFTSL by almost 167 EFTSL in 2009, Projected to surpass DEEWR funded load target of 4,337 EFTSL by around 272 EFTSL in 2010

Current data indicates the University will surpass the DEEWR EFTSL targets for both 2009 and 2010.

Operating margin

Target: 2009 operating profit as a proportion of total revenue: 3% increase on previous year
Performance: 2009 operating profit as a proportion of total revenue: 2% increase on previous year

The operating margin (operating profit as a proportion of total revenue) of 16% as at 31 December 2009 is 1% below the 2009 target.

Liquidity ratio

Target: University’s ability to repay short-term debts repay short-term debts (current assets over current liabilities) of 1.30:1
Performance: University’s ability to (current assets over current liabilities) of 1.86:1

The liquidity ratio (current assets over current liabilities) reflects the University’s ability to meet short term debts. The 31 December 2009 ratio of 1.86:1 was above the Australian university average ratio for 2008 (1.85:1) and the Queensland university average ratio for 2008 (1.29:1).

The current debt facilities of the University allow for an operating overdraft of $4M (previously not drawn upon) and longer term debt facilities pre- approved by Queensland Treasury Corporation.

Employment costs as a percentage of revenue

Target: Employee benefit costs less than 60% of total revenue
Performance: Employee benefit costs 50.5% of total revenue

The 2009 employment costs as a percentage of total revenue result was 50.5%. This result was a 1.7% decrease on the 2008 position, and fell below the 2008 Australian university and Queensland university averages. This decrease was achieved through the commitment from University Executive to manage employment costs and to increase external funding.

Employment costs include associated fringe benefits tax and provisions for long service leave and recreation leave. Total revenue includes capital funding grants and donations, which reduces the employment costs as a percentage of revenue as a result.

Revenue by source categories

Target: Reduce the University’s economic dependency on Commonwealth Government funding to 70% of operating grant by 2010
Performance: 76.7% economic dependency on Commonwealth Government funding in 2009

Total revenue earned for the period ended 31 December 2009 was $109.0M. Australian Government Grants include Commonwealth Government Support, HECS-HELP arrangements and other DEEWR operating funds. Student Fees and Charges include full-fee paying International Award and Non-Award students and associated administration charges.

Consultancy and Contracts includes all research and non-research commercial funding. The University continues to grow its research and consultancy contracts with non-government sources. The Australian Government Grants and State and Local Government Grants include some contractual funding for research purposes, which is independent to the general operating revenue of the University. Other Revenue includes University donations and interest income.

The University continues to rely on government support, particularly in relation to capital infrastructure and general operating activities. Approximately 4% of Australian Government Grants received is allocated to funding the repayment of debt.

The University’s economic dependency on Australian Government financial assistance funding (excluding student contributions of HECS-HELP related assistance) is anticipated to remain high over the triennium, averaging 80%. While considerable efforts are being undertaken to attract additional external funds to be used in the operations and capital programs, it is unlikely that this target will be met.

Forward planning for 2010

  • Review the University’s Strategic Plan, led by the Vice-Chancellor and President, and in partnership with senior staff.
  • Include sustainability-related strategies and KPIs in the Strategic Plan in compliance with the University’s new Sustainability Policy.
  • Measure faculty-level performance against new KPIs (developed in 2009).
  • Increase promotion of non-traditional admission schemes and scholarships, to allow the University to benefit from any legislative changes introduced by the Federal Government.
  • Plan, in 2010, for the introduction of a new Vice-Chancellor in 2011.

Notes for: Commonwealth Grant Scheme (CGS), Domestic and International Fee-Paying Equivalent Full Time Student Load (EFTSL) from 2005 to 2010 (projected for 2010)

  1. Based on full year data. Estimates for 2010 based on extrapolation of Census 1 and 2, 2009 data.
  2. Includes Enabling, TPP, Undergraduate and Postgraduate CGS EFTSL.
  3. Includes International on-campus, online and off-campus transnational (TNE) EFTSL. The University’s withdrawal from offering transnational programs in China, Fiji and Malaysia impacted on the overall totals for international EFTSL. In 2008, TNE accounted for 113.375 EFTSL; in 2009 only 34.0 EFTSL is attributed to TNE programs. No EFTSL was included for TNE programs in 2010 estimates.
  4. Includes Postgraduate, HDR, Headstart and Visiting domestic fee-paying EFTSL. A number of postgraduate programs offered by Faculty of Science, Health and Education have been moved to CGS load commencing 2010.

LEARNING AND TEACHING REVIEW

GOAL To provide an increasingly comprehensive range of programs that position students for success in the global economy and which are aligned to the University’s priorities

In 2009, the University was recognised at a national level for its quality of learning and teaching:

  • USC was the only public university in Queensland to gain five stars for teaching quality in the 2010 Good Universities Guide. The annual Guide also awarded USC five stars for its staff qualifications, and for graduates’ satisfaction with the generic skills they gained while at university.
  • USC won an unprecedented six Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) citations in 2009, gaining national recognition for its quality academics and for its special programs that help school students reach university, feel at home once they arrive, and study overseas on exchange. See also page 30.
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

School of Communication
School of Social Sciences

Undergraduate students 1,676
Postgraduate students 67
Research students 29
Male:female 28%:72%
Programs 51

Achievements in 2009

  • Lecturer in Communication, Anna Potter, received an ALTC citation for academic excellence.
  • Bachelor of Arts graduate Laura Monaghan was named the Sunshine Coast Regional Council’s Young Citizen of the Year.
  • Bachelor of Communication graduate, Bethany Young, received the Chancellor’s Medal.
  • Bachelor of Arts graduate, Victoria Oyama, received the Faculty Medal for Arts and Social Sciences.
  • Associate Professor Stephen Lamble received the Vice-Chancellor’s Medal for Outstanding University Teacher.
  • Journalism student Kelli McClintock was named the Sunshine Coast Daily’s intern of the year for 2008.
  • The Public Relations Institute of Australia accredited the Bachelor of Public Relations and Bachelor of Corporate and Public Affairs.
  • Three new programs were approved to enrol students in 2009: Graduate Certificate in Arts, Graduate Diploma in Arts, Master of Regional Planning by Research.
Faculty of Business

Undergraduate students 1,118
Postgraduate students 265
Research students 19
Male:female 50%:50%
Programs 43

Achievements in 2009

  • Senior Lecturer in Accounting, Dr Monte Wynder, received an ALTC citation for academic excellence.
  • Bachelor of Business graduate Jonty Bush was named Young Australian of the Year for 2009.
  • Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Business graduate, Nickey Wilson, and Bachelor of Business (Accounting) graduate, Paul Eveleigh, jointly received the Faculty Medal for Business.
  • An ‘Understanding Contemporary Property’ professional development course was delivered to the property sector.
  • The Financial Planning Association of Australia Limited accredited the Bachelor of Commerce (Financial Planning) and Master of Financial Planning.
  • The Executive Master of Business Administration, a flexible program delivered one weekend a month, over two years, took its first enrolments.
  • Two new programs were approved to enrol students in 2009: Master of International Business, Bachelor of Property Economics and Development.
Faculty of Science, Health and Education

School of Health and Sport Sciences
School of Science and Education

Undergraduate students 2,033
Postgraduate students 401
Research students 80
Male:female 32%:68%
Programs 70

Achievements in 2009

  • Coordinator for First Year Students, Dr Ann Parkinson, received an ALTC citation for academic excellence.
  • Bachelor of Science (Environmental Science) graduate, Kaylet McDonald, received the University Medal for highest overall achievement and the Faculty Medal for Science, Health and Education.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Sustainability, focused on sustainable resource management and climate change, took its first enrolments.
  • Four students were the first in the world to graduate with a Master of Climate Change Adaptation.
  • A minor in sustainability was introduced as an elective option for undergraduate students in all faculties.
  • Three new programs were approved to enrol students in 2009: Bachelor of Education (Primary), Bachelor of Civil Engineering, Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Science (Honours) Deans Scholars Program.
Students in other programs

Cross-institutional enrolments 12
International Inbound Exchange 27
Integrated Learning Engineering 5
International Foundation Pathway 4
Study Abroad 278
Tertiary Preparation Pathway 237
Visiting (Headstart) 75
Census 1 numbers.

Learning by doing

An integral part of the University’s approach to learning and teaching is work integrated learning— providing as much practical experience as possible to prepare students for success in their chosen career. A record number of organisations (429) provided student placement opportunities as part of the Work Integrated Learning (WIL) program in 2009, and some activities are detailed below.

  • Eight creative writing students contributed to a joint project between the University and UnderWater World, producing the first book about the popular Sunshine Coast attraction. The project was part of an ongoing program enabling students to develop their skills in professional environments.
  • Regional and urban planning students conducted research to help identify how existing bicycle paths are used, bicyclists’ motivations for cycling, and what cyclists think about bicycle routes and facilities. The research was supported by the Sunshine Coast Regional Council and Queensland Transport.
  • Final year public relations students took part in a range of industry projects. In May, a team of five students coordinated the official launch of the Encouragement Foundation, an innovative organisation that aims to spread the power of encouragement throughout the community. Students also provided public relations support for the Tour de Kawana charity cycle, helping to increase participant numbers from 750 in 2008 to 1,000 in 2009.
  • Around 130 business students researched and developed an international marketing plan for the Smart Hook, created by Sunshine Coast resident Hans Jusseit. The project earned the University an entry into the Australian Marketing Institute awards.
  • Around 100 advanced design students displayed their works at two popular exhibitions at the University Art Gallery. The exhibitions displayed portfolios of students about to embark on careers in marketing, advertising, multimedia and communication. The exhibitions were well-attended by industry representatives and members of the community.
  • Final year nutrition and dietetics students produced a cookbook to show how a healthy, tasty diet is possible on a typical student food budget. The book and other nutrition and healthy activity programs were funded by a $47,000 grant from the Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing. The cookbook was distributed free to students at Semester 2 Orientation.
  • Two business students coordinated a sustainability workshop to assist business operators in the accommodation and service sectors in running cleaner and greener operations. The forum was conducted as part of the Sunshine Coast World Environment Day Festival, held on campus.
  • Paramedic science students undertook six weeks of on-the-road training with the Queensland Ambulance Service as part of the professional learning requirements of their degree.
  • A business marketing student worked as an intern for a prestige car dealership on the Sunshine Coast, organising a cocktail gala for the Queensland launch of the new E-class Mercedes-Benz.
  • A website designed to give creative writing students an edge in publishing attracted the likes of bestselling authors Kate Forsyth (fantasy) and Jack Dann (speculative fiction) within months of launching. Scriber Space was upgraded in June to an interactive site with social networking facilities such as Twitter, Facebook, chat and internal email.
  • A total of 29 students engaged in internships or paid employment within the Innovation Centre and its tenant companies during the year.
  • After completing an internship with NRL club Manly-Warringah, Michelle Smit (Bachelor of Public Relations) secured the Media and Publicity Coordinator role with another NRL club, the Newcastle Knights. Ms Smit was offered the position with the Knights before she completed her degree.

Performance against targets

Graduate satisfaction with educational experience as measured through Australian Graduate Survey (AGS)

Target: Maintain rating in each scale
Performance: Rating maintained in each scale for 2008 AGS (as reported in 2009) Note: AGS results for 2009 are released in 2010.

Target: Ranking in the top quintile of all higher education providers in all three of the assessed discipline groups (LTPF)
Performance: Ranked in the topquintile of higher education providers in each discipline group

In the Australian Graduate Survey, three core scales are used to assess Graduate Satisfaction: the Generic Skills Scale, the Good Teaching Scale and the Overall Satisfaction Index.

Summarised above are the results for the three core scales for student satisfaction (includes both undergraduate and postgraduate students) for the three faculties, and the University as a whole for 2005 to 2008. Results are shown as percentage agreement for each scale (percent agree + percent strongly agree).

Participation in the AGS is not compulsory, hence response rates vary annually.

Overall the University has performed strongly in the three core scales of the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ). The actual score for each scale has been maintained from 2005 to 2008, although there was a decrease in the actual score for the three scales in 2007.

An analysis of the three-year average indicates that, across the 2005 to 2008 period, the scores for the Generic Skills Scale (GSS) have improved slightly, the Good Teaching Scale (GTS) has improved by around 5% and the scores for the Overall Satisfaction Index have been maintained.

Student satisfaction as measured through the Australian Graduate Survey (AGS) is used in the Learning and Teaching Performance Fund (LTPF) to assess excellence and improvement in learning and teaching in Australian universities. Since 2007 the LTPF has been used to assess performance in four discipline groups: Science, Computing, Engineering, Architecture and Agriculture; Business, Law and Economics; Humanities, Arts and Education; and Health.

Overall, USC performed strongly for the three indicators of graduate satisfaction for each of the assessed LTPF discipline groups. In 2009, USC ranked first nationally in the Humanities, Arts and Education Group for all three performance indicators, and was above the national average for all graduate satisfaction indicators in all discipline groups.

In most instances, USC has ranked in the top quintile of all Higher Education Providers nationally, with a few exceptions in the 2007 and 2008 LTPF. In the 2009 LTPF the KPI target was achieved for all graduate satisfaction indicators in all three of the assessed discipline groups.

Student feedback on courses (SFC) and teaching (SFT)

Target: Achieve overall average score of at least 4.0 on a 5.0 scale for “Overall, I was satisfied with the quality of this course”
Performance: Exception: A change in University policy affected the reporting of this KPI in 2009 (release of data anticipated in 2010)

Target: Achieve overall average score of at least 4.0 on a 5.0 scale for “Overall, how would you rate the teaching of the lecturer/tutor in this course”
Performance: Exception: A change in University policy affected the reporting of this KPI in 2009 (release of data anticipated in 2010)

At its meeting on 24 February 2009, the University Council approved the suspension of those sections of the Evaluation and Improvement of Teaching Policy and the Program Review and Course Evaluation Policy that make the collection of student feedback on teaching and courses compulsory. The duration of the suspension is 25 February 2009 until 24 February 2010. As this change to policy affects the comparability of data between reporting periods, data for the Semester 1, 2009 teaching period has not been aggregated.

The Strategic Information and Analysis Unit, in consultation with the Chair of the Learning and Teaching Management Committee, prepared a functional specification for a replacement electronic student feedback system in 2009. Information Technology Services were consulted regarding the technical specifications, and Financial Services were consulted regarding the University’s procurement process.

Number and proportion of students undertaking work integrated learning (WIL)

Target: Annual increase in the number of eligible students undertaking WIL
Performance: Exception: A new reporting system was implemented in 2009 (release of data anticipated in 2010)

Target: Annual increase in the proportion of eligible Bachelor graduates having undertaken WIL
Performance: Exception: A new reporting system was implemented in 2009 (release of data anticipated in 2010)

Prior to 2009, data on WIL placements was not aggregated University-wide. To enable reporting on the number and proportion of students undertaking Work Integrated Learning, an audit of all existing courses was undertaken in 2009. Faculties assessed existing courses and specified which courses and what level of Work Integrated Learning was provided based on the tiers specified in the Work Integrated Learning Policy. In addition, the Work Integrated Learning component of new courses is now being captured at approval stage.

This information and that obtained from faculties for existing courses was being added to the PeopleSoft Student System in late 2009 to enable ongoing reporting. Preliminary testing of reports has commenced and it is anticipated that analysis will be completed in 2010.

Notes

Uptake of transition programs by students

Target: Maintain the number of new TPP enrolments each year
Performance: 69% increase on new TPP enrolments

The Tertiary Preparation Pathway (TPP) is a program developed by the University to provide prospective students with an alternative entry pathway to tertiary study. TPP courses were first offered in Semester 2, 2006 and have increased each year since.

For Semester 2, 2009 there was an increase in new enrolments of 104%, compared to Semester 2, 2008.

All TPP enrolments for Semester 1 and 2, 2009 achieved a 71% increase on numbers for Semester 1 and 2, 2008.

Notes

Forward planning for 2010

  • The Faculty of Arts plans to: provide opportunities for work integrated learning in 100% of FASS-based programs; and increase emphasis for generic arts, social science and humanities programs and courses, balanced with accredited professional programs.
  • The Faculty of Business plans to: develop a Visiting Academic Program to assist in the development of new programs and to provide expertise in areas of need; align program outcomes with the requirements of professional bodies and employment markets generally; and implement curricular review, revision and enhancement on an annual basis.
  • The Faculty of Science, Health and Education plans to: cater for continuing increases in enrolments in nursing, paramedic science, civil engineering and occupational therapy programs at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels; continue development of midwifery and early childhood programs for delivery in 2011; and explore the potential introduction of sports medicine, speech pathology and community mental health programs in 2011.
  • Establish an e-Learning Project Team and Fellowships within Teaching and Research Services in response to external reviews by the Learning and Teaching Management Committee (LTMC) and its e-Learning Reference Group.

Notes for: Number and proportion of students undertaking work integrated learning (WIL)

The three tiers are described in the Work Integrated Learning Policy as:

  • Tier 1. Industry/Professional Placement tier: learning in the workplace. It is a generic term for all immersed work integrated learning situations. This includes internships, practicums and clinical placements.
  • Tier 2. Industry/Professional Component tier: applying theory to workplace practice. Courses with a workplace component are ‘applied learning’, as opposed to the immersed learning of the Industry/Professional Placement Tier. This includes applied research projects, industry projects, simulations and production workshops.
  • Tier 3. Industry/Professional Interaction tier: learning from industry experts. This includes field trips, industry visits, site visits, guest lectures and the Employability Program.

Notes for: New Enrolments in Tertiary Preparation Pathway by Semester

  1. Includes Domestic and International Tertiary Preparation Pathway (TPP) and International Foundation Pathway (IFP) enrolments.

RESEARCH REVIEW

GOAL To concentrate the University’s research effort and achieve national and international distinction in ways that advance University priorities

Sustainability and regional engagement are the foci of research at USC. In 2009, the University’s research capacity increased, major national and international accolades were received, and research projects diversified, with the major highlights being:

  • USC scientist created aquaculture history in 2009. The scientists, led by Professor Abigail Elizur, achieved the first captive spawning of southern bluefin tuna at the Clean Seas Tuna facility in Arno Bay in South Australia. This achievement in a temperate area, thousands of kilometres from the giant fish’s tropical breeding grounds off the coast of Indonesia, was a key step towards commercialisation and a revolution of the tuna industry. The USC researchers worked as part of a collaborative team that included Australian and international researchers, with support from the Australian Seafood Cooperative Research Centre. Time Magazine rated the ‘tank-bred tuna’ research project second on their list of the 50 most important inventions of 2009—after NASA’s Ares Rockets. Professor Elizur’s work on this project earned her the Vice-Chancellor’s Medal for Outstanding University Researcher in 2009.
  • Director of the University’s Sustainability Research Centre, Professor Tim Smith, and his research partners in a major climate change adaptation project in Sydney, won a prestigious Australian Museum Eureka Prize. The three-year project involved Professor Smith and representatives from the Sydney Coastal Councils Group, WWF and the CSIRO assessing the ability of Australia’s largest city to adapt to future climate conditions.
  • Dr Christian Jones, Senior Lecturer in Interactive Digital Media, was part of a joint University and Queensland Police Service partnership that created an online computer game to help children avoid abduction. The Being Safety Smart game was trialled in nine Sunshine Coast schools to assess its effectiveness in boosting the personal safety knowledge of children aged 6-8. Dr Jones spent more than two years creating the animated game, and was awarded a Queensland Police Service gold award for crime prevention for his efforts in August.
  • Honours student Jane-Louise Lampard won one of 10 scholarships from Water Quality Research Australia for her study on the quality of recycled water. Ms Lampard found the potential of exposure to concentrations of five contaminants of concern to be lower in recycled water as opposed to other sources such as food and lifestyle choices.
  • Psychology graduate Ingrid Hawkins earned the opportunity to present her thesis to the Australian Psychological Society (APS), as part of a prize won earlier in the year through APS. Ms Hawkins’ research examined the links between a person’s knowledge of their genetic predisposition to Type 2 diabetes, and their intentions to lead a healthy lifestyle.
  • Senior Lecturer in Chemistry Dr Peter Brooks, Senior Lecturer in Environmental Chemistry Dr Neil Tindale and laboratory technician Daryle Sullivan were part of a collaboration that won a major research award at the annual Healthy Waterways 2009 presentations, in recognition of their water-quality studies at Boreen Point. A second water-quality study, led by Associate Professor of Heritage Resource Management Bill Carter, on World Heritage-listed Fraser Island, found levels of nutrients and coliforms in the groundwater of the island’s camping zones to be well in excess of Queensland standards.
  • Biomedical science student, Karina Hamilton, completed nationally-significant research into the fatty acid concentrations of commercially available Omega 3 capsules. Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) funded Karina’s research and flew her to Canberra to present her findings.
  • Senior Lecturer in Vegetation and Plant Ecology Dr Alison Shapcott commenced a project working closely with the Australian Macadamia Growers Society (AMS), the Department of the Environment and Resource Management (DERM) and the local Indigenous people, to save the Macadamia Jansenii species. It is believed that the species only exists in a single stand of 60 trees in Bulburin National Park.
  • Twenty-four academics and higher degree by research students made presentations at the 2009 University Research Conference. Clean Seas Tuna Chairman Hagen Stehr was the keynote speaker, presenting the research being performed with USC’s Professor Abigail Elizur. The annual event promotes the quality, impact and benefit of USC research to academic colleagues and the wider community.
  • Future forestry research at the University was bolstered by the appointment of three Queensland Primary Industries and Fisheries (QPIF) researchers as associate professors. Collaboration between the University, QPIF and the CSIRO has resulted in joint forestry projects worth more than $7 million in recent years.
  • The Sustainability Research Centre was established, following the success of the Sustainability Research Group in the publication of more than 100 research papers and in attracting $2 million in competitive research funding in 2008. Key aspects of the centre’s research include coastal management, climate change, water management, natural and cultural heritage, innovation, adaptive growth and community well-being.
  • Tourism and Marketing Lecturer Vikki Schaffer conducted PhD research into the benefits of the sinking of the former HMAS Brisbane off Mooloolaba in 2005. Preliminary results from her study found the conservation park has contributed almost $18 million to the Sunshine Coast economy in the four years since the ship was scuttled.
  • Dr Scott Burnett led a research project to count the numbers of quolls, an endangered carnivorous marsupial, inhabiting the Mary River headwaters in forest reserves around Conondale, Kenilworth and Kandanga. Using heat-activated cameras, the Wildlife Ecology lecturer counted the animals as part of the Wildlife Preservation Society of Queensland (WPSQ) project, ‘Protecting Quolls in Queensland Landscapes’.

Performance against targets

Research publications

Target: Annual increase in total publication points awarded by DIISR in the HERDC
Performance: Increase of 75.78 publication points in 2008 (as reported in 2009) Note: Publication points for 2009 are released in 2010.

Target: Annual increase in average HERDC publication points per T&R staff FTE
Performance: Increase of 0.3 publication points per T&R staff FTE in 2008 (as reported in 2009) Note: Publication points for 2009 are released in 2010.

The total weighted publication points showed a significant increase of about 60% from 2007 to 2008, which also provided an increase of 0.3 publication points per FTE from 2007 to 2008.

Publications (weighted)20052006120072008
Books 7.5 25 7.5 30
Chapters 7.03 15.46 15.59 20.81
Journal Articles 41.41 58.1 79.24 100.19
Conference Publications 31.63 30.08 18.62 45.74
Total 87.57 128.64 120.96 196.74
Target A achieved? YES YES NO YES
Per FTE 0.83 1.05 0.84 1.14
Target B achieved? YES YES NO YES

Summarised above are total publication points (weighted) for each publication category; and publication points (weighted) per full-time equivalent (FTE) academic staff member (including adjuncts).

Notes

Research income

Target: Annual increase in total research income based on HERDC data
Performance: $3,664,609 – an increase of almost 55% on 2008

Target: Annual increase in average research income (HERDC data) per T&R staff FTE
Performance: An increase of 42% in research income per T&R staff FTE

Research income from the public sector and industry increased, while the amount of monies received from competitive grants dropped slightly in 2009. Overall, total research income increased more than 500% since 2005, from $0.7M to over $3.6M in 2009.

The per T&R staff FTE research income increased to $19,571 in 2009 (from $13,771 in 2008).

Notes

Number of completing higher degree by research (HDR) students

Target: Increase the number of HDR students completing a HDR award each year
Performance: Exception: The release of 2009 data is anticipated in 2010

For 2009 there were 31 theses examined. A further three theses are under examination at the time of this report. This potentially indicates an overall increase in the number of students completing a HDR award, but this cannot be confirmed until final data has been reported to DEEWR (2009 data due to be reported in April 2010).

Notes

Forward planning for 2010

  • Implement the Library Research Support Strategy.
  • Identify (through University Foundation) prospects and cultivate relationships with the potential to support research at the University, with the intention of securing at least one gift of $100,000 by December 2010.
  • Further develop the research policy framework (finalise the Honours, Masters, PhD, External Grants and Intellectual Property Policies, which were drafted in 2009).

Notes for: Publications (weighted) table

  1. The official data reported to DEEWR for 2006 on 30 June 2007 was 119.32 total weighted publication points. After this date, additional publications were identified and included in the publications count.

Notes for: Total research income ($ Million) by faculty and year

  1. The 2009 data is unaudited as it is reported to DIISR in June the following year.

Notes for: Number of HDR completions by faculty from 2005 to 2009

  1. Office of Research have estimated likely completions for 2009, based on theses examined. Official HDR completion data is reported to the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) in the Past Course Completions Files at 30 April each year.

REGIONAL ENGAGEMENT REVIEW

GOAL To engage in productive partnerships to further the region’s interests and the University’s strategic priorities

In 2009, USC connected with...

Business and industry
  • Business Professionals’ Forum: providing monthly executive education and networking opportunities for Sunshine Coast business professionals. Launched in May, six forums were held during the year. A partnership between USC Faculty of Business, CPA Australia, The Institute of Chartered Accountants.
  • Enterprise Tuesday: networking events for innovative ambitious businesses. Building on a successful year in 2008, six events were held in 2009, attracting more than 250 business delegates. An Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast initiative, sponsored by Westpac.
  • USC_Link: the University’s clearing house for requests from regional business and industry for R&D/problem-solving support. Live in 2009, the Network involves around 20 of the University’s top researchers. A USC Office of Regional Engagement initiative.
Environment and science
  • World Environment Day: attracting a record crowd of more than 6,500 people in June, the festival highlighted how individuals could help reduce carbon emissions. Co-hosted by USC, the Sunshine Coast Environment Council, Sunshine Coast Regional Council, SEQ Catchments.
  • Fraser Island: increasing numbers of school students, researchers and hikers used the University’s education camp and research facilities at Dilli Village on Fraser Island (14,273 bed nights in 2009). A USC Faculty of Science, Health and Education activity.
  • Science Centre of Innovation and Professional Practice (SCIPP) event: a professional development opportunity for Sunshine Coast teachers. Popular television presenter and author Dr Karl Kruszelnicki delivered the keynote address at the Innovation Centre. An event hosted on campus.
Property and development
  • Understanding Contemporary Property Seminar: providing an assessment of current conditions relating to the development of property in Sunshine Coast region. Industry experts examined the south-east Queensland property market at the second annual seminar. A USC Faculty of Business initiative.
  • Sunshine Coast Regional Forum: bringing local and state leaders together with industry professionals to consider new ways to deal with growth and development on the Sunshine Coast. Co-sponsored by USC, Parsons Brinckerhoff, Sunshine Coast Regional Council.
  • State of the Region Summit: bringing together decision-makers, researchers and strategists from public and private sectors to discuss major issues facing the Sunshine Coast. USC presented the seminar, ‘Environmental Trends: Trade-offs, Business and the Environment’. An event hosted on campus.
Arts and culture
  • Voices on the Coast Youth Literature Festival: providing the opportunity for more than 4,000 school students to meet and learn from top international and Australian authors, illustrators and poets. An annual event co-presented by Immanuel Lutheran College and USC.
  • Indigenous Education Symposium: helping to raise awareness of Indigenous culture and facilitate understanding between Indigenous Australians and the wider community. Now in its second year, the October event again proved popular with USC staff, students and community representatives. A USC Buranga Centre initiative.
  • Language Immersion Day: increasing school students’ interest in studying a foreign language at university. Around 120 high school students attended workshops run by University academics and international students. A USC Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences initiative.
  • University Art Gallery: exhibiting works by students, travelling exhibitions and contemporary Australian artists. The gallery attracted a record number of visitors for the fifth consecutive year—15,369 people, with the number of visitors from school groups higher than in 2008. A USC facility for the University and community.
Health and sport
  • Sunshine Coast Sports Hall of Fame: featuring local high-achieving sportspeople since 1991. In November 2009, world waterski champion Emma Sheers and champion racehorse trainer Bruce McLachlan were inducted into the University Health and Sport Centre’s Hall of Fame in front of around 100 guests. A USC initiative.
  • Northern University Games: a gathering of sporting students from 10 universities in Queensland and northern New South Wales. Around 600 students visited the campus to take part in the games in July. The University finished fourth overall and won the Ron Leahy Shield, in recognition of USC athletes’ high levels of sportsmanship. An Australian University Sport event, hosted by USC.
Schools and lifelong learning
  • Science, Engineering and Technology Expo: providing students with scientific activities they might not have access to in their schools. The second annual expo attracted almost 300 school students to the University’s state-of-the-art laboratories from 41 schools across the Sunshine Coast. Hosted by USC.
  • Business Enterprise Day: encouraging students to consider various business-related career paths by introducing them to a diversity of businesses and business people. Around 100 Year 10 students from across the region attended the event in October. A collaboration between USC Faculty of Business, Business Educators Association of Queensland, Sunshine Coast Enterprises.
  • Headstart: giving Year 11 and 12 students the opportunity to study at university and get a headstart on their degree. More than 100 students from across the region participated in the ALTC citation-winning program in 2009. A USC initiative.
  • Murri Pathways: delivering education and training presentations to more than 400 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students through Sunshine Coast and Cooloola high schools. This project demonstrated positive outcomes towards improving enrolment in higher education, with the number of Indigenous students admitted to the Tertiary Preparation and Headstart Programs at USC increasing significantly in 2009. A collaboration between USC, Education Queensland, TAFE.
  • Child Protective Practices Conference: finding creative and evocative approaches to working with young people, within the scope of child protective services. The second annual conference was held in September, and built on themes from 2009 Child Protection Week. Co-hosted by USC and the Department of Communities. The University also hosted the Australian Historical Association Annual Conference in 2009.

Two academics and a student from USC were invited to attend the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen in December. Adjunct Professor Dr Robert Kay represented the low lying Pacific island nation of Kiribati alongside Master of Climate Change Adaptation student, and Kiribati national, Riibeta Abeta. Professor Noel Meyers was invited by the Governor of the Indonesian province of Papua to accompany his delegation, to help ensure Papua s forests continue to lock up carbon while preserving more than 23 million hectares of pristine rainforest.

Buderim triathlete Chloe Turner was the University’s first Sportsperson of the Year in 2009. Ms Turner won a silver medal in her division of the ITU World Triathlon Championships at the Gold Coast in September, and received her USC award at the inaugural Sports Awards Ceremony in November. The Sport and Exercise Science student’s stellar year included finishing first in her age group at the Australian University Triathlon Championships, winning USC’s Great Court Race, and finishing third in the Open category of the Noosa Triathlon.

Recruitment efforts in 2009 included 122 visits to more than 80 schools, 11 career markets, two university roadshows and an information day for guidance officers. Eight information events held on campus saw student and staff ambassadors talking to an estimated 5,700 people about their study options at the University. Attendance rates were strong at the on-campus information events throughout the year, including Open Day (4,100 visitors, a 17 percent increase on 2008) and Options Mid-year (220 visitors, up from 100 in 2008). New events were also well-attended, with the Primary Education Evening and Postgraduate Evening attracting 80 and 100 guests respectively.

Performance against targets

Research and consultancy within the region

Target: Annual increase in the percentage of research and consultancy income related to projects of regional relevance
Performance: 12 percentage point decrease in research and consultancy related to income projects of regional relevance

While regional relevance is evident in a significant proportion of the institution’s research and consultancy income (50%), a 12% decrease was experienced in 2009. This decrease may be attributed to a large overall increase in research and consultancy income ($4.7M compared to $2.9M in 2008).

Data for this KPI is based on the Higher Education Research Data Collection (HERDC) reported research projects and consultancy project information (managed by the Office of Research with income data from Financial Services). The 2008 research data has been updated in line with audited HERDC reported income.

Notes

Learning and teaching within the region

Target: Increase the number of regional professions, businesses and industries in which students undertake Work Integrated Learning (WIL)
Performance: 429 regional professions, businesses and industries in which students undertook Work Integrated Learning (WIL) Note: 2009 is the first year a whole-of-University figure has been available, hence there is no comparison to 2008 to demonstrate an increase or decrease.

In 2009, there were 429 regional professions, businesses and industries in which students undertook Work Integrated Learning (WIL).

For this report, data on WIL placements was tracked manually, with datasets held separately within operational areas. Given that datasets were held separately, there is some potential for double counting of regional partners (eg. where a partner takes WIL placements from more than one operational area) although this is likely to occur only occasionally.

The Career Placement Database (SONIA) was implemented in 2009, however, a number of issues delayed user take-up of the application. To encourage database usage, a proposal to train a SONIA ‘expert user’ is currently being reviewed. Once business units are confident in their knowledge of the Career Placement Database, more accurate data will be available for reporting.

Engagement focused on shared jointly funded infrastructure

Target: Annual increase in the number and value of shared jointly funded infrastructure
Performance: The number and value of shared jointly funded remained infrastructure at 2008 levels

The 11 joint infrastructure initiatives identified range from occupancy licenses (U3A) through to joint investment/funding (ICT Building), to in-kind developments (Compensatory Habitat). It also includes major projects (Sports Stadium) and smaller initiatives (Alumni Way). All initiatives are currently on campus.

The total investment by USC’s partners was $11.36 million.

Engagement focused on support to advance the knowledge economy

Target: Annual increase in jobs and businesses created within within the region (via the Innovation Centre)
Performance: 34% increase in jobs created the region (via the Innovation Centre)

At the end of 2009 there were 34 companies in the Innovation Centre (including ICSC Pty Ltd). This included 20 incubator clients, eight companies in the Accelerator, and four associate member companies. They employed 85 full-time and 30 part-time staff, as well as 31 University researchers, giving a total of 146. This was compared to 109 staff employed in 2008.

This data reflects employment created directly through the operation of the Innovation Centre and associated business development programs. Since 2008, an option has been made available for companies to join as associate members. These companies are either not yet ready for office space, are based elsewhere in the region, or are past tenants who want to stay in touch. They have access to ongoing business support, network and discounts on hiring facilities.

Number of graduating students employed in the region

Target: Annual increase in the number of graduates employed or self-employed in the region
Performance: The number of graduates employed in or self-employed the region in 2009 remained at similar levels to 2008

The number of graduates employed locally on a part-time basis increased in 2009, however the number employed in a full-time capacity decreased. The decline in the local full-time employment rate is consistent with a decline in the overall percentage of Australian resident USC graduates in full-time employment between 2008 and 2009, and may reflect the impact of the economic downturn in 2009.

Forward planning for 2010

  • Continue to emphasise partnerships across research and consultancy, learning and teaching, and engagement domains, while also focusing on advancing the knowledge economy and fostering sustainable jobs and employment, particularly for USC graduates.
  • Manage the USC_Link project to facilitate engagement with the Sunshine Coast community and stakeholders, with an initial review of operations in September 2010.
  • Demonstrate best-practice in regional engagement by establishing a discipline area within the University for studies and research into the role of regional universities in the engagement with, and sustainable development of, their regions.
  • Identify projects and engage with government in supporting researchers seeking funding for projects of regional relevance and state, national and/or international significance.
  • Maintain key external linkages with key partners through membership of multi-stakeholder strategic groups such as Sunshine Coast Regional Council, Sunshine Coast TAFE and Sunshine Coast University Hospital Project.
  • Investigate, seek approval for, and establish a multi-discipline/multi-partner project to provide a flagship for regional engagement.

Notes for: Research and consultancy within the region

Regionally relevant income was identified as fulfilling one or more of the following three criteria:

  1. The project/consultancy was undertaken with a regional partner;
  2. The project/consultancy was based on the region; or
  3. The project/consultancy topic was relevant to the region.

INTERNATIONALISATION REVIEW

GOAL To engage in international activities, including internationalisation of the curriculum, to heighten academic, economic, and cultural benefits for the region

Connecting with the world in an exchange of ideas, experiences, research and culture is important in higher education. In 2009, the University’s global outreach extended to study and research opportunities, awards and acknowledgement for good practice, with major highlights in the following countries:

Sweden

PhD candidate Nubia Ramos took up a six month placement at Sweden’s world-renowned Karolinska Institute, continuing her research into the effects of oestrogen on E. coli and the impacts on instances of urinary tract infections.

South Korea

A group of 13 international business students, along with a USC lecturer, spent 11 days in South Korea in September, exploring the export potential for Australian seafood, while also bolstering educational and trade relations. Trade Queensland sponsored the group’s attendance at the 2009 Asia Pacific Cities Summit, in Incheon.

USA

Three students from the American mid-west were appointed as student ambassadors by the Australian Educational International embassy, after completing a semester of study at the University. Hadley Arnett, Lindsey Holt and Kassandra Lang were among 24 students returning to North America from Australian universities who were elected to the positions.

Belgium

The University’s strong links with European institutions led to students being invited to apply to study a two- year Erasmus Mundus Master Program in Adapted Physical Activity, offered by a consortium of four European universities and funded by the European Union. The A$36,000 annual stipend is richer than any PhD scholarship offered in Australia.

Germany

Student Ken Wasmund delivered his PhD seminar in July before flying to Leipzig, Germany, to start his post- doctoral fellowship funded by the European Union, at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research. After completing his Bachelor of Science (Microbial Ecology), Honours degree and PhD at USC, Mr Wasmund successfully applied for the three-year job. Bachelor of Arts student Rosalie Maguire won a six-month scholarship to study design at Germany’s University of Applied Science, in Augsburg. She will be the first student from the University to undertake studies at the German institution.

Indonesia

Teachers from the Indonesian province of Papua travelled to campus for a 10-week education program. The 24 teachers worked with teachers and students at eight Sunshine Coast high schools, attended lectures and workshops, and joined in science and Indigenous youth conferences. A USC team of educators gained a $540,000 grant from AusAID to appoint the teachers as Australian Leadership Awards Fellows. The fellowship program promotes sustainable development and excellence in education in the Asia-Pacific region.

The GO Program

At the Queensland Education and Training International Awards in Brisbane, the Global Opportunities Program won the Excellence in Outward Mobility award, recognised for promoting internationalisation. At the same ceremony, Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Business student Rachel McKay was named Queensland Student Ambassador of the Year. Ms McKay spent two semesters abroad, first at Kyungpook National University in Korea, then at the University of Mannheim, Germany.

International student profile

International students 880
Undergraduate and postgraduate coursework 543
Higher degree by research 25
Study Abroad 278
Exchange 27
Other pathways 7
Census 1 numbers.

Top countries in 2009

1.Germany
2.USA
3.Canada
4.France

Top GO destinations in 2009

1. USA 22 students
2. Japan 15 students
3. Germany 12 students
4. Korea 9 students

Performance against targets

Proportion of on-campus international students in the on-campus student body

Target: International on-campus EFTSL to comprise 25% of all on-campus EFTSL by the end of 2010
Performance: International on-campus EFTSL comprises 14.4% of all on-campus EFTSL in 2009

International on-campus EFTSL for 2009 comprised 14.4% of total on-campus EFTSL. International on-campus EFTSL more than doubled from 337.1 EFTSL in 2005 to 750.9 EFTSL in 2009. From 2005 to 2009, whilst international on-campus EFTSL increased significantly, domestic on-campus EFTSL also saw significant growth, equivalent to a 69% increase over this period. Therefore, although international on-campus EFTSL has shown a substantial increase, it is unlikely that the KPI target will be achieved by 2010 due to the concurrent increase in domestic on-campus EFTSL.

Throughout each year, USC International participates in IDP’s statistical benchmarking, which focuses on enrolments by country, year-on-year and semester-on-semester.

Notes

Number and proportion of eligible students undertaking part of their undergraduate program overseas

Target: Annual increase in the number of students undertaking part of their undergraduate program overseas
Performance: Increase of 4 students undertaking part of their undergraduate program overseas

Target: 10% of eligible Bachelor graduates to have undertaken part of their program overseas by 2010
Performance: 7.4% of eligible Bachelor graduates have undertaken part of their program overseas in 2009

The number of students undertaking part of their undergraduate program overseas increased from 57 in 2005 to 72 in 2009. The proportion of eligible Bachelor graduates to have undertaken part of their program overseas increased from 4.1% in 2005 to 7.4% in 2009. Each year there has been an increase in the number of graduate students completing overseas study, however there was a slight decrease in the proportion from 2008 (7.5%) to 2009 (7.4%).

Notes

Forward planning for 2010

  • Continue to increase participation in the Global Opportunities program, relative to the previous year, to 10% by the end of 2010.
  • Continue to increase the proportion of on-campus international students enrolled in Study Abroad, exchange or award programs, to reach 25% of total on-campus EFTSL.
  • Increase the proportion of full-time T&R staff involved in teaching or research with an international university to 20% by the end of 2010.
  • Work to securing a positive international reputation for the institution, facilitating productive engagement with international partner universities, and facilitating the recruitment of students.
  • Increase focus on the delivery of Academic English and the International Foundation Pathway, while discontinuing the delivery of General English (based on an internal review of USC International in 2009).
  • Continue to participate regularly in the benchmarking activities of the Australian Universities International Directors’ Forum, focusing on outbound student mobility, international office cost and recruitment costs by market.

EFTSL name=notesintEFTSL>Notes for: On-campus international EFTSL as a proportion (%) of total on-campus EFTSL

  1. Based on full year data. Estimates for 2010 based on extrapolation of Census 1 and 2, 2009 data. For these estimates, on-campus load excludes transnational (TNE) enrolments.

Notes for: Number of students undertaking part of their undergraduate program overseas

  1. Students are included if they have undertaken overseas studies as part of either a formal exchange program or in-country language studies at anytime during the calendar year specified.
  2. Estimates based on Census 2, 2009 data.

Notes for: Proportion of eligible Bachelor graduates who have undertaken part of their undergraduate program overseas

  1. Students are included if they are a domestic Bachelor graduate, excluding Honours graduates.
  2. Students are included if they have undertaken overseas studies as part of either a formal exchange program or in-country language studies.

STUDENT SUPPORT REVIEW

GOAL To set standards in student support which will help attract, support and retain students

Moving towards greater social inclusion: throughout 2009 the University worked to enhance opportunities for participation by equity groups.

Financial support

Financial support available to students by way of scholarships, bursaries and prizes increased again in 2009, improving access to the University for people from low socio-economic groups. Some 600 undergraduate students received scholarship support in 2009, worth more than $1.8 million. Of these, 150 students were supported by scholarships funded by the support of University sponsors and donors, to a total value of almost $200,000.

The University’s six academic excellence scholarships were awarded to first-year undergraduate students in April. Established in 2008 by USC Foundation using donations, the Renouf Family Scholarships, Tim Fairfax Regional Scholarships and USC Chancellor’s Scholarships are worth $12,000 each.

A first-year engineering student was awarded the inaugural Les and Mary Hall Family Scholarship, established in 2008 following a $100,000 donation from the Hall family. Other notable scholarships awarded in 2009 included:

  • three $1,000 equity bursaries from the University of the Third Age;
  • five $1,000 bursaries from the Australian Federation of University Women;
  • three postgraduate Rotary Scholarships worth $2,500;
  • and 28 Headstart Scholarships given to local high school students to streamline their transition from school to tertiary study.

Students starting at the University in 2010 were able to apply for a share of $383,500 of scholarships by the end of November. The 60 scholarships on offer ranged in value from $3,500 to $12,000 over three years, and were funded by USC and by private donors. Eligibility depended on a variety of factors including academic merit, community/ extracurricular activities and financial need.

The continued increase in scholarship provision, and the anticipated introduction of the Commonwealth Start-up Scholarships in 2010, positions the University well with regard to the recommendations stemming from the Bradley Review of Australian Higher Education—specifically the report’s recommendation that by 2020, 20 percent of undergraduate enrolments be from low socio- economic backgrounds.

Indigenous support

Participation rates for Indigenous students at USC continued to exceed national averages in 2009. Compared to 2008 full-year data, new Indigenous student enrolments increased by 35 percent, with the largest increase in non-award programs, particularly the Tertiary Preparation Program (TPP).

The Employment and Participation Strategy for Indigenous Australians at USC 2005-2008 was reviewed during the year, and expanded to include opportunities for student internships.

The new Indigenous Employment and Career Development Strategy 2009-2011 is being developed to increase teaching, mentoring and professional development opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people at USC. A DEEWR Indigenous Employment Program grant of $250,000 was secured in 2009 to support this work over two years.

In other support activities for Indigenous students, four USC undergraduates received $5,000 Indigenous health access scholarships from Australian Rotary Health—out of 10 awarded in Queensland. It was the seventh year the scholarships have been issued nationwide, in conjunction with the Commonwealth Government.

The University launched its first Reconciliation Action Plan in October, setting specific targets in developing greater relationships, respect and opportunities for Indigenous people. Developed over two years, the plan will help ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people studying at USC have real opportunities to improve their social and economic outcomes.

Academic support

Enrolments in the Tertiary Preparation Pathway (TPP) continued to increase in 2009, with both semesters experiencing greater intakes than in 2008. Classes were held in the community at a local school, where students included eight teenage mothers from the Nambour- based group ‘Supporting Teenagers with Education, Mothering and Mentoring’ (STEMM). Four STEMM graduates gained entry to USC degrees in 2010.

The Tertiary Enabling Program (TEP) expanded its offerings, adding courses in physiology, business spreadsheet skills, and fundamental accounting to the existing suite of chemistry, general mathematics, mathematics for physics, statistics, biology, writing skills, computer literacy, and research methods. More than 300 students were enrolled in TEP in 2009.

The University continued its focus on encouraging students to seek support services throughout their studies. The academic and social activities of Orientation were well-attended, with Semester 1’s program of events attracting 1,500 new students (out of a possible 2,400 commencing students).

In a step forward for encouraging low socioeconomic students to enter university, USC became a partner in The Smith Family’s Learning for Life program early in the year. Under the agreement, the University will contribute $20,000 each year for the next three years to assist the organisation in supporting financially- disadvantaged students.

Careers support

Students gained valuable information on how to “future proof” their careers at the annual Careers Fair organised by Student Life and Learning. The event in March included displays by 30 companies and four guest presentations by industry experts about finding work and staying employed during tough economic conditions.

Students also had access to a record number of student placement opportunities with local organisations in 2009. More than 400 businesses participated in the Work Integrated Learning (WIL) program, providing students with valuable workplace experience to prepare for their careers.

Performance against targets

Student feedback on infrastructure and services as measured through Australian Graduate Survey (AGS)

Target: Improve the annual percentage of Agreement responses in the AGS Student Support Scale
Performance: Increased from 57.5% to 57.8% in the 2008 AGS (as reported in 2009) Note: AGS results for 2009 are released in 2010.

Target: Improve the annual ranking relative to other higher education providers for percentage of Agreement in the AGS Student Support Scale
Performance: Remained in sixth place in the 2008 AGS (as reported in 2009) Note: AGS results for 2009 are released in 2010.

The Student Support Scale is not a compulsory component of the AGS, therefore the national average is based on a limited number of institutions. In 2005 and 2006 only 12 institutions provided results, with 14 institutions providing results in 2007 and 2008.

Overall, USC’s graduate satisfaction in the Student Support Scale increased from 55.9% in 2005 to 57.8% in 2008. An annual increase was achieved in 2006 and 2008, with little change in 2007. USC was above the national average for 2005, 2006 and 2008 (see above). USC’s annual ranking improved from 5th to 4th between 2005 and 2006, but decreased to 6th in 2007 and 2008.

Notes

Participation and access rates for equity groups

Target: Annual increase in the number of commencing Indigenous students
Performance: 35% increase in the number of commencing Indigenous students

Target: Achieve national annual participation rates for equity groups
Performance: Exceeded 2008 national participation rates for Indigenous, regional and disability; low SES target not met Note: Figures for 2009 are released in 2010.

Target: Achieve national annual access rates for equity groups
Performance: Exceeded 2008 national access rates for Indigenous, regional and disability; low SES targets not met Note: Figures for 2009 are released in 2010.

2009 enrolment figures after Census 2 showed a 35% increase in new Indigenous student enrolments, compared to 2008 full year data. Non-award programs had the largest growth in Indigenous enrolments for this period, with the majority enrolled in TPP programs.

The 2008 USC participation rates for Indigenous students (1.58%), students with a disability (4.85%) and students from regional areas (29.60%) exceeded the participation rates for all universities nationally (1.29%, 4.13% and 18.09% respectively); for students from low socio-economic backgrounds USC’s participation rate (12.50%) was below that for all universities nationally (15.09%).

Although below the national average, USC’s participation rate for students from low socio-economic backgrounds has improved since 2005. The participation rate is a percentage of all domestic students.

The Disability Services Officer and Career Advisers regularly participate in post-school options expos held on the Sunshine Coast, in Brisbane, and in conjunction with Sunshine Coast TAFE. The University is also associated with the regional National Disability Coordination Officer, a federally funded program provided to target the barriers that people with a disability face in gaining access to, and successfully completing, post-school education and training. The 2008 USC access rates for Indigenous students (1.61%), students with a disability (3.79%) and students from regional areas (31.00%) exceeded the access rates for all universities nationally (1.58%, 3.43% and 19.07% respectively); for students from low socio-economic backgrounds USC’s access rate (13.72%) was below that for all universities nationally (16.05%). The access rate is a percentage of commencing domestic students.

Notes

Undergraduate student progress rates

Target: Improve annual undergraduate student progress rate
Performance: Increase of 1.4% to an annual undergraduate student of progress rates 84.7% in 2008 Note: Figures for 2009 are released in 2010.

Target: Improve annual ranking relative to other higher education providers for undergraduate progress rates for each DEEWR LTPF grouping
Performance: Improved annual ranking for each DEEWR LTPF grouping, student relative to other higher education providers

Progress rates include new and continuing, domestic and international undergraduate students (and do not include TPP or Enabling students). Undergraduate progress rates have improved each year since 2005, and increased from 83.3% in 2007 to 84.7% in 2008.

In addition, student progress rate comparisons for all institutions are produced by the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR). These rates are adjusted to be comparable across institutions and are used in the Learning and Teaching Performance Fund (LTPF) to assess excellence and improvement in learning and teaching in Australian universities.

USC’s overall performance for progress rates remains low, but is improving, as is its ranking relative to other higher education providers. USC was ranked nationally 34th, 34th, 35th in the 2007 LTPF; 30th, 27th, 33rd in the 2008 LTPF; and 25th, 25th, 32nd in the 2009 LTPF, for Group 1 (Science, Computing, Engineering, Architecture and Agriculture), Group 2 (Business, Law and Economics) and Group 3 (Humanities, Arts and Education), respectively.

In the 2009 LTPF an assessment of improvement for each performance indicator was also undertaken. The results from the improvement assessment indicate there has been some increase in progress rates. The average annual change was 1.9% per year for the Science, Computing, Engineering, Architecture and Agriculture Discipline Group 1, 0.9% per year for the Business, Law and Economics Discipline Group 2 and 0.7% per year for the Humanities, Arts and Education Discipline Group 3.

Notes

Undergraduate student retention rates

Target: Improve annual undergraduate attrition (inverse retention) rates
Performance: 2.2% improvement in annual undergraduate attrition (inverse retention) for all students from 2008 to 2009

Target: Improve annual ranking relative to other higher education providers for retention of commencing students or each DEEWR LTPF grouping
Performance: Improved annual ranking for one of three DEEWR LTPF groupings, relative to other higher feducation providers

The attrition rate (inverse retention) for all domestic bachelor students for the 2008 to 2009 period was 25.3% (compared to 27.5% in 2007 to 2008). The domestic Bachelor attrition rate for new students has declined since 2006, from 41.6% in 2006 to 2007, to 34.0% in 2008 to 2009. For continuing students, there was also a decline in attrition, from 23.1% in the 2006 to 2007 period, to 20.3% in the 2008 to 2009 period.

Student retention rates are used in the Learning and Teaching Performance Fund (LTPF) to assess excellence (and in 2009 also improvement) in learning and teaching in Australian universities. Following the LTPF assessments, DEEWR released results for each institution, adjusted to be comparable across institutions.

Overall performance for retention rates remains low. USC’s ranking for retention rates was placed in the range of the lowest to fourth-lowest performance nationally, for all three of the assessed Discipline Groups for 2007, 2008 and 2009. In all instances these results are below the national average, but could be related to the effect of the ‘feeder institution’ role of USC.

In the 2009 LTPF an assessment of improvement for each performance indicator was also undertaken. The results for the improvement assessment indicate there has been some increase in retention rates for the Humanities, Arts and Education Discipline Group 3 (2.8% per year), however there has been a decrease in retention rates for the Science, Computing, Engineering, Architecture and Agriculture Discipline Group 1 (-0.5% per year) and the Business, Law and Economics Discipline Group 2 (-0.8% per year).

Forward planning for 2010

  • Increase the number of University- funded scholarships, prizes and bursaries available to students to 170.
  • Develop a Student Retention Plan to ensure a supportive academic and social environment in which students from all backgrounds can achieve their full potential.
  • Review post-VSU service provision with the Student Guild and Student Liaison Committee, with recommendations to be implemented.
  • Participate in the national Ally project, supporting lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer students and staff on campus.
  • Establish an Indigenous Employment Coordinator position to assist students in accessing cadetship opportunities, and to build the profile of USC as a workplace of choice for Indigenous people on the Sunshine Coast.
  • Improve Indigenous student recruitment, support and success in undergraduate and postgraduate study, to see Indigenous enrolments proportionate to, or exceeding, the population of Indigenous people in the region.
  • Increase the number of students with disabilities to a proportion comparable to, or in excess of, the national average, through targeted promotion of the University’s support services.

Notes for: Annual percentage agreement for the AGS Student Support Scale

Combination of percentage of responses that Agree or Strongly Agree with the Student Support Scale items:

  • I was able to access information technology resources when I needed them
  • Relevant learning resources were accessible when I needed them
  • Health, welfare and counselling services met my requirements
  • The library services were readily accessible
  • I was satisfied with the course and careers advice provided

Notes for: Number of new (commencing) Indigenous students (enrolments) annually

  1. A student is defined as a new student if they have been admitted to the University for the first time; re-admitted into a program following completion of a program, withdrawal, abandonment or exclusion; or when admitted to a new career (eg. from non- award to undergraduate).
  2. As per the DEEWR definition, only domestic students with a permanent home residence in Australia are included.

Notes for: Participation rates (%) for equity groups at USC for 2005-2008, including the 2008 national participation rate and Access rates (%) for equity groups at USC for 2005-2008, including the 2008 national access rate

  1. Domestic students with permanent home residence in Australia only.

Notes for: Undergraduate progress rates by teaching faculty

  1. Level -UG: undergraduate -courses offered to undergraduate and honours students (does not include TPP). Most cross institutional, visiting, Study Abroad and Exchange students enrol in undergraduate courses. As per DEEWR calculation, Enabling students are not included in the calculation of the progress rate due to the nature of their assessment.
  2. Teaching Faculty -faculty responsible for the teaching of a particular course. Up until 2006, EFTSL for core courses was distributed evenly across faculties. Since 2007 EFTSL for core courses has been attributed to the faculty responsible for teaching the course.

LTPF assessments are based on progress rate data two years prior. For example, the 2009 LTPF is based on 2007 data.

STAFF REVIEW

GOAL To attract, retain, develop and reward excellent staff

USC staff won an unprecedented six Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) citations in 2009:

  • Dr Ann Parkinson – For improving the learning outcomes for foundation students in biology and physiology through innovative pedagogies and resources.
  • Anna Potter – For excellence in curriculum design, assessment practice and academic leadership that supports and motivates students to learn in a large, first-year foundation course.
  • Dr Monte Wynder – For sustained enthusiasm in curricula development and delivery that models and generates creative problem solving to prepare flexible and innovative accounting graduates.
  • Liani Eckard – For enhancing the cultural engagement, personal development and employment opportunities of students through a leading Global Opportunities Program.
  • Margot Reeh – For developing university-wide, student-to-student mentor and advising programs that enhance the university experience of beginning students and benefit the student leaders personally and professionally.
  • The Headstart Program – For enhancing Year 11 and 12 students’ development as individuals and as learners, through immersion in university courses across all faculties.
Staff awards and achievements in 2009
  • Professor Abigail Elizur’s research on ‘tank-bred tuna’ earned her second-place in Time Magazine’s ’50 best inventions of the year’.
  • Professor Tim Smith, Director of USC’s Sustainability Research Centre, and his research partners, won a prestigious Australian Museum Eureka Prize for their major climate change adaptation project in Sydney. The three-year project involved Professor Smith and representatives from the Sydney Coastal Councils Group, WWF and the CSIRO assessing the ability of Australia’s largest city to adapt to future climate conditions.
  • Sport scientist Associate Professor Brendan Burkett was one of 150 inaugural sporting icons to be inducted into the Queensland Sports Hall of Fame. Dr Burkett also received the 2009 Outstanding Service to Swimming Australia award from the Australian Swimming Coaches and Teachers Association, and was appointed sports scientist to the Australian swim team at the International Paralympic Committee World Short Course Championships in Brazil.
  • Art and Design academic, Dr Lisa Chandler, received the Sunshine Coast Regional Council’s 2009 Creative Award for her dedication towards developing and supporting the region’s creative sector.
  • Dr Christian Jones, Senior Lecturer in Interactive Digital Media, won a Queensland Police Service (QPS) gold award for crime prevention. Dr Jones has been part of a joint USC and QPS partnership, creating an online computer game to help children avoid abduction.
  • A book co-authored by Associate Professor of History Dr Joanne Scott won a gold medal in the National Trust of Queensland awards. Dr Scott and Dr Ross Laurie (The University of Queensland) spent four years researching and writing ‘Showtime: A History of the Brisbane Exhibition’, which was published in time for the 2008 Ekka. Dr Scott also took a fellowship at the National Film and Sound Archives in Canberra (awarded in 2008).
  • Lecturer in Japanese Studies and International Relations, Donna Weeks, was awarded a Harold White Fellowship from the National Library of Australia.
  • USC Head of Environmental Science Associate Professor Bill Carter won the Eric Anderson Prize for best article published in the Australasian Journal of Environmental Management in 2008-09. The article was co-authored by University of Queensland’s Dr Chris Jacobson and Associate Professor Marc Hockings.
  • Professor John Lowe, Head of the School of Health and Sport, was appointed senior editor of the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, a major health publication. Professor Lowe will hold the position until the end of 2012.
  • Several staff awards were presented at the 2009 Graduation ceremony: Associate Professor Stephen Lamble received the Vice-Chancellor’s Medal for Outstanding University Teacher; Professor Abigail Elizur received the 2009 Vice-Chancellor’s Medal for Outstanding University Researcher; Joanne Davey and Jennie McNeich received the Vice-Chancellor’s Medal for Outstanding Service (Administrative, Professional and Technical); and the Learning and Teaching Management Committee received the Vice-Chancellor’s Medal for Outstanding Service (Teaching and Research).
Staff profile

Total staff 517
T&R 188 (36%)
APT 329 (64%)
Full-time 437 (85%)
Part-time 80 (15%)
PhD 103 (20%)
Masters or higher degree 143 (28%)
Indigenous Australians 6 (1.2%)
All figures are FTE and exclude casuals.

Staff appointments and promotions in 2009

Forty-nine part-time and full-time employees were added to the USC payroll in 2009, bringing the total full-time equivalent (FTE) staff figure to 517—an increase of 10.5 percent on 2008. Academic staff accounted for 36 percent of the USC workforce.

The University placed an increased emphasis on internal progression in 2009. From January until November, 14 internal staff appointments were made, 35 staff secondments occurred and 40 individual staff received an Acting in Higher Duties Allowance. Other opportunities for internal progression were created, such as the Faculty of Business appointing two Teaching and Research Fellows from sessional staff. In the internal promotion rounds, applications from eight staff were approved (compared to four in 2008).

Senior staff appointments included:

  • Two additions to Chancellery staff during the year: USC Professor of Property and Development, Mike Hefferan, was appointed as Pro Vice-Chancellor (Regional Engagement); and Chief Financial Officer, Peter Sullivan, was appointed as Pro Vice-Chancellor (Corporate Services). Both also retained their existing titles and portfolios.
  • Peter Hinton, formerly of Queensland University of Technology, was appointed as Director of Marketing and Communications.
  • Award-winning academics were appointed to the Faculty of Science, Health and Education: Dr Noel Meyers as Professor of Education and Head of the School of Science and Education; and Professor Mark Porter as Professor of Engineering.
  • Dr Hugh Lavery, one of Australia’s most experienced field scientists who has advised on major public and private sector projects in Australia and overseas, joined USC as Adjunct Professor of Land Planning within the Office of Regional Engagement.
USC an employer of choice

The University received its fifth consecutive citation from the Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Agency, as an Employer of Choice for Women. The University was one of 12 Queensland organisations to earn the citation. The citations are awarded annually in recognition of organisations’ efforts to increase the representation of women at senior staff levels and to help staff maintain work/life balance.

Staff satisfaction survey

The results of the University’s first Staff Climate Survey were explored through staff focus groups in 2009, with an emphasis on identification of areas for improvement. More than 200 staff attended the various focus groups. Combined with the 53 percent of staff who participated in the online survey, conducted in August 2008, more than 70 percent of staff participated overall in the survey and focus groups.

The research found that staff showed a strong sense of engagement, had a clear view of their individual roles and how they contributed to the ‘bigger picture’, and perceived there is good teamwork within their immediate workplace. Overall the results were similar to university sector benchmarks, with the scores tending to be slightly above average.

Performance against targets

Staff profile: proportion of women in senior positions

Target: Proportion of women in senior positions to be equal to, or above, the sector average
Performance: Proportion of women in senior USC positions remained above sector average in 2009 (39% compared to 35%)

Overall, the University remained above the sector averages for senior female staff. In 2009 female staff were in 39% of senior positions at the University, which remained above the sector average of 35%.

High qualifications profile

Target: To be in the top quintileof Australian higher education providers for percentage of T&R staff (FTE) with a Master or higher level degree
Performance: Ranked in the top quintile of Australian higher education providers for percentage of T&R staff (FTE) with a Master or higher level degree

Target: To be in the top third of Australian higher education providers for percentage of T&R staff staff (FTE) with a PhD by 2010
Performance: Ranked in the top third of Australian higher education providers forof T&R percentage with a PhD, (FTE)

For several years, the University has been in the top quintile of Australian Higher Education Providers for T&R staff (FTE) with a Master or higher level degree (based on available published data for 2005–2008). Based on the proportion (%) for 2009, it is expected the University will remain within the target measure. *

Similarly, the University has remained in the top third of Australian Higher Education Providers for T&R staff (FTE) with a Doctor of Philosophy, based on available published data for 2005–2008. Based on the proportion (%) for 2009, it is also expected the University will remain within the target measure. *

Summarised on the following page is the number and proportion of Teaching and Research (T&R) staff (FTE) with either a Master or higher level degree, or a Doctor of Philosophy for 2005 to 2009. Also provided is the national rank of the University for these categories, where available.

Senior professional appointments in 2009 included the Head of School of Science and Education, Professor of Engineering, Director of Marketing and Communications, and Adjunct Professor of Land Planning. Following the promotion round in December, USC now has 24 professors and 35 adjunct professors.

The proportion of teaching and research staff at Associate Professorial (Level D) and Professorial levels (Level E) increased by 13.5% in 2009.

* Sector Average derived from Universities’ HR Benchmarking Program ©.

Notes

DEEWR staff FTE data on academic staff levels 2008-2009
Level2008% change2009% change
Above senior lecturer (D & E) 37 37% 42 13.5%
Senior lecturer (C) 46 7% 46 -
Lecturer (B) 63 13% 62 -1.6%
Associate lecturer (A) 27 71% 38 40%
Total staff 173 20% 188 8.5%

Forward planning for 2010

  • Continue negotiation of the University’s fourth Certified Agreement.
  • Provide recruitment and selection training, guidelines and support to selected staff.
  • Maintain a proactive workplace rehabilitation program, with time lost to injury remaining lower than sector average.
  • Embed equity principles into policy, procedures and practices, ensuring gender pay equity within Australian sector (EOWA), and 100% staff completions of EO Online by end of 2011.
  • Establish an ongoing Indigenous Employment Officer position, and implement the Indigenous Employment and Development Strategy (created in 2009).
  • Establish strategies (such as Chairs and research funds) to aid in the international recruitment of academic and research staff.
  • Implement recommendations from the review of the Promotion and PDP policies and procedures.

Notes for: High qualifications profile

  1. Derived from published DEEWR Staff Tables as at 31 March each year. 2009 data is not released until late 2010.

Environmental Sustainability Review

GOAL To continue to lead, by example, in the areas of campus planning and development, sub-tropical architecture and all operations that have environmental impact

Creating a more sustainable future: the University embarked on a wide range of sustainability projects in 2009, in the fields of learning and teaching, research and regional engagement.

  • A Sustainability Research Centre opened in the Innovation Centre in March. Key aspects of the centre’s research include coastal management, climate change, water management, natural and cultural heritage, innovation, adaptive growth and community well-being.
  • A minor in sustainability was introduced as an elective option for undergraduate students in all faculties.
  • Assessment of the compensatory habitat on campus continued throughout 2009. Ongoing PhD research focused primarily on the settlement of the habitat, weed control, and managing the snake population within the habitat. Further work on the habitat will be on better integrating the 15 hectare site into its location adjacent to the University’s sports precinct.
  • Sustainable water use for air-conditioning was introduced, with independent testing confirming that water in the University’s lakes was suitable for use in air-conditioning cooling towers on campus.
  • A Wildlife Endowment Fund was established to support the study and monitoring of native wildlife on campus—particularly kangaroos. Studies of the University’s kangaroo population conducted during the year found no major change in numbers on campus or in the surrounding areas.
  • The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) granted the University permission to discharge treated sewerage via irrigation on the Dilli Village site. A similar filtration system will be investigated for use on campus, with the recycled water to be used to irrigate sports fields and garden areas, potentially reducing annual water consumption by an estimated 730,000 litres.
  • Also on Fraser Island, planning is well advanced for the installation of a significant solar power system to power cabins, the caretaker’s house and sewerage system at Dilli Village.
  • The University participated in Earth Hour on Saturday 28 March, joining people and organisations around the world in turning off non-essential lights and electrical appliances for an hour to demonstrate a commitment to action on climate change.
  • The public had the opportunity to participate in sustainable development debate and learn how to help reduce carbon emissions at World Environment Day, held on campus in June.
  • The University was involved with a number of forums discussing sustainable development for the Sunshine Coast. Topics included: urban development, population and infrastructure demands, affordability and climate change, and climate change adaptation skills for professionals.
  • University staff travelled to the UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen, representing the interests of Kirribati and Indonesia.
USC collaborates on climate change

The University joined a collaborative study between the Queensland and Australian Governments, the CSIRO Climate Change Adaptation National Research Flagship, Griffith University, and the University of Queensland, to investigate the ability of towns, cities, industry and governments to adapt to climate change conditions.

The ‘South East Queensland Climate Adaptation Research Initiative’ project will involve researchers working to assess the climate change vulnerability of the region, from Noosa to Coolangatta and west to Toowoomba, and determining how ready the region is for climate change and what cost-effective strategies are required. USC received more than $861,000 in CSIRO collaboration funding for the project.

USC encourages public transport

The opening of the $5.5 million bus interchange on campus created greater public transport options for Sunshine Coast residents in 2009. It generated additional bus services, catering for an estimated 8,400 extra passengers per week across the region. The ‘green link’ attached to the interchange reduced travel times (by up to 10 minutes in peak hour) for buses exiting the campus, and encouraged greater pedestrian and cyclist access onto the campus from Chancellor Park.

A number of other strategies were undertaken throughout the year to encourage greater use of public transport and reduce the effects of traffic and parking on campus. Printed and electronic information for new and current students included messages encouraging carpooling or using public transport. The second annual survey on traffic, transport and parking was undertaken, with more than 730 students and staff responding. The survey results indicated an increased uptake in public transport among students compared to 2007 (rising from 9.3 percent to 16.5 percent).

Discussions continued with Queensland Transport and the Sunshine Coast Regional Council regarding the introduction of a subsidised GO Card for students to use on Sunshine Coast public transport, for probable introduction in 2010.

Sustainability plans for the future

Although unsuccessful in round one of the EIF, the University aims to pursue its plans for eventual development of its ambitious Glasshouse Complex. Comprising Australia’s tallest sealed-system glasshouse, aquaculture tanks, a Sustainability Research Centre and an Interpretive Centre, the cutting-edge complex is intended to enable Australia to unlock the potential of its tropical and subtropical trees for carbon sequestration, and ensure communities adapt to meet the challenges of climate change. The estimated cost of the project is $30.3 million.

Performance against targets

Water consumption

Target: Maintain water usage of 5 kilolitres per EFTSL per annum
Performance: Achieved 4.4 kilolitres in 2009

Total water consumption was 4.4kL per EFTSL for the 12 month period to December 2009. This was below the annual target of 5kL per EFTSL per year, and a decrease of 0.2kL on 2008.

200120022003200420052006200720082009
Total water consumption (kL) 8731 10,375 13,605 15,960 17,154 20,652 20,483 20,939 23,069
Water consumption per EFTSL (kL/EFTSL) 3.7 3.9 5.0 5.4 5.3 5.5 5.0 4.6 4.4
Cleaning and Waste Management Services
200120022003200420052006200720082009
Total cleaning cost ($/EFTSL) 118 132 132 127 110 99 136 137 132
Security
200120022003200420052006200720082009
Total cost of security ($/EFTSL) N/A 152 193 182 158 151 148 154 129
Proportion of expenditure allocated to environmental sustainability

Target: Increase proportion of capital expenditure allocated to sustainability initiatives
Performance: 38.5% of capital expenditure allocated to sustainability initiatives Note: 2009 is the first year a whole-of-University figure has been available, hence there is no comparison to 2008 to demonstrate an increase or decrease.

The proportion of capital expenditure allocated to sustainable expenditure was 38.5%. This was an unusually high expenditure, and included final works to connect the cooling towers to the lake system water supply, staged replacement of the refrigerated air conditioning with chilled water systems in Building B, heat exchange technology for treatment of incoming fresh air to Building J, and installation of energy efficient bulbs in 75% of lighting across campus.

Energy consumption

Target: Maintain power usage per gross floor area of 0.55 GJ/m2 per annum
Performance: Maintained 0.55 GJ/m2 in 2009

Target: Maintain carbon emissions per gross floor area of 135kg of CO2/m2 per annum
Performance: Achieved 134kg of CO2/m2 in 2009

Carbon emissions per GFA were 134kg of CO2/m2 – below the annual target of 135kg of CO2/m2. The University maintained an annual power usage target of 0.55 GJ/m2. The target for power usage appears to have been met, but this outcome has been calculated on data provided by the network operator, Energex, due to the inability of the retailer, AGL, to provide detailed data.

Forward planning for 2010

  • Implement a carbon offset arrangement in relation to air travel by international students and USC International staff.
  • Deliver enhanced systems to manage food wastage and the usage of food products, to maintain an annual wastage register below 5%.
  • Deliver an annual departmental reduction in motor vehicle travel expenses, through the promotion and adoption of flexible working practices, teleconferencing and vehicle sharing.

Governance

University leadership (principal officers)
Vice-Chancellor and President

Professor Paul Thomas AM
BSc(Hons), DipEd Wales, MA Lough., PhD Qld., FACE, LRPS
University CEO, responsible to University Council for strategic development, organisational leadership and day-today operations of the University

Inaugural Vice-Chancellor of the University of the Sunshine Coast since it opened on 1 January 1996. Planning President of the University 1994-1996. Previous posts include Head of Education at Kelvin Grove Campus of BCAE (later Queensland University of Technology), then Campus Principal and Professor within QUT. Prior to arriving in Australia, held senior posts in British higher education. Awarded a Centenary Medal for services to higher education in 2002 and on Australia Day 2007 was honoured with an Order of Australia medal (AM) for services to higher education and the establishment of the University of the Sunshine Coast. A Fellow of the Australian College of Educators and a recipient of a Rotary International Paul Harris Fellowship. Extensive experience on major committees, with research, publication, teaching and consultancy interests in management and leadership.

In December 2009, Professor Thomas informed University Council that he would not seek an extension of his contract when it expires in December 2010. The recruitment process for a new Vice-Chancellor and President commenced in December 2009, with an appointment anticipated in mid-2010 and the term of office to commence in January 2011.

Deputy Vice-Chancellor

Professor Greg Hill
CertTeach, BA(Hons), PhD Qld.
Oversees the academic functions (learning, teaching and research) of the University, with responsibility for related support areas including Teaching and Research Services, Information Services, Student Administration and Student Life and Learning

Appointed Deputy Vice-Chancellor March 2005. Previously Foundation Professor of Tropical Environmental Science 1995-2004 and Dean 1997-2004, Charles Darwin University, establishing four University and national research centres. Reader in Geographical Sciences and Director of the ARC Key Centre in Land Information Studies 19791994, University of Queensland. Former Chair of Northern Territory Board of Studies. Former member of Kakadu National Park Research Advisory Committee.

Pro Vice-Chancellor (International and Quality)

Professor Robert Elliot
BA(Hons) NSW, MA La Trobe, DipEd Melb., PhD Qld.
Oversees, manages and advises on internationalisation, quality improvement, marketing and communication and the collection and analysis of strategic information

Pro Vice-Chancellor (International and Quality) and Professor of Philosophy. A member of University Council and Chairperson of the Internationalisation Advisory Committee and Web/Portal Application Support Group. A member of Academic Board and the Student Disciplinary and Student Grievance Appeals Committees. Former foundation Dean of Arts and subsequently Dean, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of the Sunshine Coast, from 1995 until 2005.

Pro Vice-Chancellor (Corporate Services) and Chief Financial Officer

Peter Sullivan
BBus, BCAE, FCPA
Oversees the University’s planning, budgeting, financial and information technology services as well as implementing internal controls and risk management systems

Appointed to the University in December 2007. Previously Executive Director, Finance and Resource Planning, Queensland University of Technology. Experience in the higher education sector includes the integration of planning, budgeting, performance management and risk management frameworks in support of Strategic Planning and strategic financial management. Responsible for the effective management of the University’s assets and compliance with statutory requirements.

Pro Vice-Chancellor (Regional Engagement)

Professor Mike Hefferan
BA Qld., GradDipMgmt C.Qld., MAppSci, PhD Qld.UT.
Oversees the University’s links with its primary stakeholders and its regional community in achieving the teaching and learning and research priorities of the University

Pro Vice-Chancellor (Regional Engagement) and Professor of Property and Development. Appointed to the University in 2008. Previously the Director of the Institute for Sustainable Resources at the Queensland University of Technology. A Registered Urban and Rural Valuer, a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors, a member of the Property Council of Australia and the Urban Development Institute of Australia. Currently Vice- President of the Australian Institute of Valuers, Queensland Division and a member of the organisation’s National Education Board.

University Council (governing body)

Under the University of the Sunshine Coast Act 1998, the University is governed by an 18-member University Council representing University and community interests.

University Council has the power to manage and control University affairs, property and finances, and appoint University staff. Where allowed under the Act, University Council may delegate powers to an appropriately qualified member of council or member of the University’s staff; or to an appropriately qualified committee that includes one or more members of council.

The University Council met six times in 2009.

University Council leadership

Chancellor

John M Dobson OAM
Leads the University Council and presides at Council meetings

Elected Chancellor in March 2007 for an inaugural term from 1 April 2007 to 31 March 2012. Member of the University Council since 1997. Parish Priest of Caloundra Parish since 1982, Dean of the North Coast Deanery within the Catholic Church since 1992. Contributions to the community include founding privately-funded residential care facilities for the aged and for people with intellectual disabilities; and co-founding a retirement village, a comprehensive college (in partnership with the United Church) and support groups for prisoners and their families.

Deputy Chancellor

Mr Tim Fairfax AM, FAICD
Acts as Chancellor in the absence of the Chancellor or when the office of Chancellor is vacant

Re-elected Deputy Chancellor for a second term from 7 April 2006 to 8 December 2009. Member of the University Council since 1 July 1996. Businessman and philanthropist. Chair, University of the Sunshine Coast Foundation. Director, Vincent Fairfax Family Foundation, and a Director, Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal. Trustee, Queensland Art Gallery. President, Queensland Art Gallery Foundation. Deputy Chair, National Portrait Gallery. Chair, Salvation Army Brisbane Advisory Board. Patron, AMA Queensland Foundation. Member, Council of Philanthropy Australia. Business interests include Director of Marinya Media Pty Ltd and Cambooya Pty Ltd.

In November 2009, Mr Fairfax informed University Council that he would conclude his service to the University at the end of the University Council term on 8 December 2009. The appointment of a new Deputy Chancellor is anticipated in early 2010.

University Council membership

University Council comprises three official members, six appointed members, five elected members and four additional members.

2009 was the final year of the fifth University Council. This Council’s four-year term of office began on 9 December 2005 and concluded on 8 December 2009. The term of office for student members of Council is two years, with the term concluding on 8 December 2009.

University Council membership for 2009 was as follows:

Term concluding 8 December 2009Term commencing 9 December 2009
Chancellor John M Dobson OAM John M Dobson OAM
Deputy Chancellor Mr Tim Fairfax AM, FAICD A Deputy Chancellor will be appointed in early 2010
Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Paul Thomas AM, BSc(Hons), DipEd Wales, MA Lough., PhD Qld., FACE, LRPS

Professor Paul Thomas AM, BSc(Hons), DipEd Wales, MA Lough., PhD Qld., FACE, LRPS

Chairperson of the Academic Board Professor Greg Hill, CertTeach, BA(Hons), PhD Qld. (Deputy Vice-Chancellor) Professor Greg Hill, CertTeach, BA(Hons), PhD Qld. (Deputy Vice-Chancellor)
Six members appointed by the Governor-in-Council
  • Mr Tim Fairfax AM, FAICD
  • Dr Suzanne Innes, BA(Hons), BEdSt Qld., GradCertTESOL NE, MSchM EdD C.Qld. (from 4 April 2008)
  • Ms Julie-Anne Mee, BBus CIAE, MAdmin Griff., FCPA
  • Dr Keith Steele, BAgrSc, MAgrSc(Hons) Massey, D Phil Waikato (to 21 May 2009)
  • Mr Michael Williams
  • One position remained unfilled
  • Dr Suzanne Innes, BA(Hons), BEdSt Qld., GradCertTESOL NE, MSchM EdD C.Qld.
  • Mr David Jeffries, BCom Qld., FCA, FAICD, FFin
  • Mr Paul Lunn, BBus S.Qld., FCPA, CA Affil.
  • Ms Julie-Anne Mee, BBus CIAE, MAdmin Griff., FCPA
  • Mr Michael Williams
  • Ms Jacquelyn Wright, BBus(Comp) NTU, Master of Computing Studies Deakin, GDipEd(Adult) S.Aust., GDipEd(Primary) NTU
Two members of the University’s academic staff
  • Professor Robert Elliot, BA(Hons) NSW, MA La Trobe, DipEd Melb., PhD Qld.
  • Associate Professor Julie Matthews BA(Hons) Brookes, PGCE Leic., PhD S.Aust.
  • Professor Rod Simpson, BSc(Hons), PhD Qld.
  • Dr Donna Weeks, BA(Hons) Griff., MIRAP Qld., GradCertArtsEntMgt Deakin, PhD Qld.
One member of the University’s full-time general staff
  • Mr Keith Cunnington (to 27 April 2009)
  • Ms Louise Ryan, BA Melb, GradDipBusAdmin QIT (from 4 June 2009)
Mr Bruce Williams, BA(Hons) Sunshine Coast
Two members of the student body
  • Ms Julie Norton, BSc(Hons), GradDipDiet Deakin, CertDiabetesEducation Curtin (from 25 February 2009)
  • Ms Elyse Wohling
  • Ms Fiona Finnegan
  • Ms Samantha Hawthorne
Four additional members
  • Mr Scott Forsdike, BBus Sunshine Coast
  • Mr Phillip Harding
  • Mr David Jeffries, BCom Qld., FCA, FAICD, FFin
  • Mr Paul Lunn, BBus S.Qld., FCPA, CA Affil.
Four additional members will be appointed in early 2010
University Council decisions in 2009
  • Approved the Advancing the Teaching-Research Nexus Statement
  • Approved the creation of a new fractional (50%) position of Pro Vice- Chancellor (Regional Engagement)
  • Approved the retitling of the position of Chief Financial Officer to Pro Vice-Chancellor (Corporate Services) and Chief Financial Officer
  • Approved the April and August re-forecasts of the University’s Operating and Capital Budgets
  • Approved a draft Strategic Asset Management Plan 2010-2014 Approved the 2010-2012 University Triennial Budget
  • Noted the results of the University Climate Survey undertaken in 2008, and the proposed recommendations and actions of the University in response to those results
  • Noted Corporate Performance Reports against the KPIs from March, May, July, September and November 2009
  • Noted the 2009 October Outcomes Report of the University Operating and Capital Budgets
  • Noted the Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast Pty Ltd financial reports as at 31 October 2009, together with an ICSC Pty Ltd 2010 Budget and Business Plan and Statement of Governance Principles
  • Approved amendments to the composition and terms of reference of the Academic Board as recommended by the Academic Board Approved the University Reconciliation Action Plan
  • Approved a revised Internal Audit Charter Approved the rescinding and replacement of the Academic Rules with Institutional Operating Policies that will be approved by the Academic Board
  • Approved amendments to the Rules for some postgraduate programs
  • Approved accreditation of the:
    • Master of Regional Planning by Research
  • Approved discontinuation of the:
    • Master of Information Technology with final admissions in the second semester of 2009
    • Doctor of Business Administration, with final admissions in the second semester of 2011
  • Undertook an end-of-term assessment of Council’s performance by way of a survey of out-going Councillors
New policies

University Council approved the following new policies:

  • Coursework Programs and Awards – Governing Policy
  • Doctoral Degrees – Governing Policy
  • Information Privacy – Institutional Operating Policy
  • Learning and Teaching – Governing Policy
  • Library Collection Development – Institutional Operating Policy
  • Research Masters Degrees – Governing Policy
  • Right to Information – Institutional Operating Policy
  • Student Academic Integrity – Governing Policy
  • Sustainability – Governing Policy
Amended policies

University Council approved amendments to the following policies:

  • Academic Dress Policy
  • Catering Policy
  • Children on Campus Policy
  • Election of Council Members Policy
  • Evaluation and Improvement of Teaching Policy
  • Hire of University Facilities Policy
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Security – Institutional Operating Policy
  • Liquor Use Policy
  • Performance Planning and Review (PPR) Policy
  • Policy for Students with a Disability
  • Policy for the Establishment and Operation of Controlled Entities
  • Program Accreditation and Course Approval Policy
  • Program Review and Course Evaluation Policy
  • Quality – Governing and Institutional Operating Policy
  • Smoking – Institutional Operating Policy
  • Student Conduct and Discipline – Governing Policy
  • Student Grievances and Appeals – Governing Policy
  • University Governance Framework – Governing Policy
  • University Health and Safety – Governing Policy
  • University Planning Framework – Governing and Institutional Operating Policy
  • Workplace Rehabilitation – Institutional Operating Policy
Rescinded policies

University Council rescinded approval for the following policies:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Admission Policy
    incorporated into new academic policies
  • Environment Policy
    replaced by the Sustainability – Governing Policy
  • Freedom of Information Policy
    replaced by the Right to Information – Institutional Operating Policy
  • Library Resources and Intellectual Freedom Policy
    obsolete following the approval of Library Collection Development – Institutional Operating Policy
  • Policy for Determination of the Academic Year
    no longer appropriate
  • Policy for the Giving and Receipt of Gifts and Benefits in relation to Officers and Employees of the University
    to be replaced with two new institutional operating policies to be approved by the Vice-Chancellor under the current policy framework
  • Rules relating to Masters by Research degrees and Philosophy and Creative Arts doctoral degrees
    following the approval of the Doctoral Degrees and Research Masters Degrees governing policies
  • Student Academic Integrity and Plagiarism Policy
    obsolete following the approval of new academic policies

In several instances, University Council approved designation of an existing policy as an Institutional Operating Policy under the University’s policy framework. In these cases, council delegated authority to either the Vice-Chancellor or to the Academic Board as appropriate, to approve amendments, replacements or discontinuations in relation to those policies in future, consistent with the policy framework.

The following policies are in the approval cycle, as at 30 November 2009:

  • Australian Learning and Teaching Council Grants – Institutional Operating Policy
  • Bachelor Honours Programs – Institutional Operating Policy
  • Coursework Programs and Awards – Governing Policy
  • Grades and Grade Point Average – Institutional Operating Policy
  • Learning and Teaching – Governing Policy
  • Postgraduate Programs and Awards – Institutional Operating Policy
  • Undergraduate Programs and Awards – Institutional Operating Policy

The following policies are in development, as at 30 November 2009:

  • Australian Learning and Teaching Council Awards – Institutional Operating Policy
  • Evaluation and Improvement of Teaching and Courses – Institutional Operating Policy
  • Learning and Teaching Grants Scheme – Institutional Operating Policy
  • Program Review and Course Evaluation – Institutional Operating Policy
University committees
Academic Board

The University’s Academic Board was established under the University of the Sunshine Coast Act 1998 as the University’s senior academic body. Chaired by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor, its 29 members include:

  • Pro Vice-Chancellor (International and Quality);
  • Pro Vice-Chancellor (Regional Engagement);
  • faculty deans;
  • chairs of Academic Board committees;
  • heads of schools;
  • academic staff;
  • students;
  • non-USC members; and
  • other senior University staff.

The role of Academic Board is to:

  • advise University Council on teaching, scholarship and research matters concerning the University;
  • formulate proposals for academic policies of the University;
  • monitor the academic activities of the University’s faculties;
  • and promote and encourage scholarship and research at the University.

The terms of reference of Academic Board were amended in 2009 as follows:

  • authority to Academic Board was given to approve the discontinuation of award programs;
  • the provision for Academic Board to reaccredit existing programs was removed for consistency, with revisions made to the Program Accreditation and Course Approval policy;
  • and the determination of the acceptance of scholarships, bursaries and prizes above the value of $5,000 per award was raised to $15,000 for consistency with relevant policy.
Academic Board decisions in 2009

In 2009 an Evaluative Review of the Academic Board and its Standing Committees was undertaken. The report from the review panel was received in October 2009. Academic Board established a working group to evaluate the recommendations and present options for the consideration of the board early in 2010.

Academic Board also received reports from the 2008 review of Information Services and the 2009 reviews of Information Technology Services and Student Administrative Processes and Practices. Progress reports on implementation plans arising from reviews were also received. Policy and procedure developments in 2009 included:

  • approval of Specifications for the Presentation of Higher Degree by Research Theses
  • revision of the classification of Majors and Minors
  • approval of a Work Integrated Learning policy
  • approval of a Student Academic Misconduct policy and development of related procedures
  • approval of a Grades and Grade Point Average policy
  • approval of policies to replace Academic Rules:
    • Admissions
    • Enrolments
    • Graduation
    • Academic Progress and Exclusion
  • recommendation of a Research Master Degrees policy to Council
  • recommendation of a Doctoral Degrees policy to Council
  • recommendation of a Student Academic Integrity policy to Council
  • recommendation of a Learning and Teaching policy, incorporating revised graduate attributes, to Council
  • recommendation of a Coursework Programs and Awards policy to Council

Academic Board accredited the following programs in 2009, to be offered in 2010:

  • ED302 Bachelor of Education (Primary)
  • SC303 Bachelor of Science – part of double degree with SC403
  • SC403 Bachelor of Science (Honours) – part of double degree with SC303
  • SC383 Bachelor of Civil Engineering
  • AR505 Graduate Certificate in Arts
  • AR605 Graduate Diploma in Arts
  • BU344 Bachelor of Property Economics and Development
  • BU782 Master of International Business

Academic Board approved the discontinuation of the following programs:

  • AE303 Bachelor of Education/Bachelor of Arts (Special Education and Psychology)
    difficult to meet dual professional accreditation requirements
  • AR381 Bachelor of Regional and Urban Planning – three-year
    superseded by the accreditation of the four-year Bachelor of Regional and Urban Planning
  • BU311 Bachelor of Business (Accounting)
    replaced by Bachelor of Commerce (Accounting)
  • BU343 Bachelor of Business (Property and Asset Management)
    replaced by Bachelor of Property Economics and Development
  • BU391 Bachelor of Business (Financial Planning)
    replaced by Bachelor of Commerce (Financial Planning)
  • BU521 Graduate Certificate in Information Systems
    insufficient student demand
  • BU581 Graduate Certificate in International Business
    discontinuation required for introduction of new Master of International Business
  • BU621 Graduate Diploma in Information Systems
    insufficient student demand
  • BU681 Graduate Diploma in International Business
    discontinuation required for introduction of new Master of International Business
  • BU781 Master of International Business
    replaced by new Master of International Business
  • BU802 Master of Information Technology
    insufficient student demand
  • BU921 Doctor of Business Administration
    program consisted of a major thesis with no coursework component, thereby duplicating the Doctor of Philosophy
  • SC381 Bachelor of Engineering (Water and Sustainable Resource Management)
    replaced by Bachelor of Civil Engineering
  • SC382 Bachelor of Engineering (Construction Management)
    replaced by Bachelor of Civil Engineering
  • SC503 Graduate Certificate in Wetlands Management
    insufficient student demand

Academic Board also recommended to University Council the accreditation of one program, the Master of Regional Planning by Research, requiring council accreditation.

Also in 2009, Academic Board approved more than 66 new courses to be made available within accredited programs; the discontinuation of 85 courses; and several changes to programs, including adjustments to majors and minors, and to component courses.

Planning and Resources Committee

In 2009 the Chancellor chaired the seven-member Planning and Resources Committee (PRC). Members include the Deputy Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor and President, one Dean or Director nominated by the Vice-Chancellor and appointed by University Council, and three external members with specific expertise in strategic financial management and planning (at least one of whom must be a University councillor). The Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Chief Financial Officer attend meetings and have participating (but not voting) rights.

The PRC met five times in 2009. Discussion focused on financial matters, budget reports, reports from the University’s controlled entity (Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast Pty Ltd), planning matters, staffing matters, capital projects, and a PRC self-assessment.

Recommendations to University Council related to:

  • amendment of the PRC’s composition and terms of reference;
  • progress towards the key performance indicators within the University’s Strategic Plan;
  • the Strategic Asset Management Plan 2010-2014;
  • appointments to the Board of Directors of the University’s controlled entity;
  • the format of the University’s annual reports;
  • policy matters; and
  • the University’s Triennial Budget 2010-2012.
Audit and Risk Management Committee

The Audit and Risk Management Committee (ARMC) has the responsibility to:

  • assess and contribute to the audit planning process relating to identification of risks and threats to the University, taking into account the financial and operational environment and its performance management framework;
  • assess and enhance the University’s governance of its internal control systems, risk management and internal audit activities; and
  • oversee and appraise the University’s financial reporting through the internal and external audit functions.

Membership includes at least four and not more than six people external to the University, including at least two University Council members. At least one ARMC member must be a member of the professional accounting or audit bodies in Australia and have a professional accounting, management consultancy or audit background. Membership is approved by University Council for a period of not more than three years.

The Audit and Risk Management Committee observed the terms of its charter and had due regard to Queensland Treasury’s Audit Committee Guidelines. The ARMC met four times in 2009. Members reviewed the composition and terms of reference of the committee, considered the University’s response to the threat of a pandemic, assessed reports on risk management and internal and external audit matters, plus reviewed draft policies concerning the Giving and Receipt of Gifts and Benefits in relation to officers and employees of the University. The ARMC also conducted the committee’s annual self-evaluation.

Recommendations to University Council related to:

  • the University’s draft 2008 Annual Financial Statements; and
  • approval for, or amendment of, relevant policies.
Honorary Awards Committee

The Chancellor chairs the six-member Honorary Awards Committee, which seeks, considers and recommends to University Council nominations for honorary awards, in accordance with the University’s Honorary Awards – Governing Policy. Membership comprises the Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor and President, Deputy Vice-Chancellor and three University Council members. The committee met formally on one occasion in 2009 to consider honorary awards for 2010. Outcomes in 2009 included the award of two Honorary Senior Fellowships—to Ken Hinds, for his services to art on the Sunshine Coast, and to John Lockhart, for his services to education on the Sunshine Coast.

Foundation Board

The Foundation Board provides consultation and advice to the University Foundation, USC’s fundraising and alumni relations arm. Foundation Board members include the Vice-Chancellor and President, two University Council members, and representatives of the Sunshine Coast community.

Foundation Board met five times in 2009 to consider:

  • amendment of the Constitution of the University Foundation;
  • completion of the Building Excellence Campaign;
  • general fundraising matters;
  • the role of University Foundation Patrons;
  • relevant policy matters;
  • an update on progress against the Foundation Strategic Plan; and
  • matters concerning the alumni relations program.

At the last meeting of the year, members of the Foundation Board paid tribute to Mr Tim Fairfax AM, Chairperson of the Board since its establishment in 1997. Mr Fairfax’s terms on both University Council and Foundation Board concluded in December 2009.

Monitoring quality

The University conducts internal audits within the relevant terms of reference and has due regard to Queensland Treasury’s Audit Committee Guidelines. The University monitors overall quality through a system of reports against performance indicators and planned targets, and scheduled regular reviews and internal audits of performance. The latter often include input from external sources.

The University Council, committees and senior managers monitor quality, performance, standards and outcomes via performance reports and data, particularly in relation to the University’s finances, Strategic Plan and thematic functional plans such as those supporting learning and teaching, research and research training, and internationalisation.

Improvement plans are developed in response to review and audit findings and regular reports on progress in achieving those plans are provided to senior University staff and such bodies as the University Executive, Academic Board and Council committees.

In response to the report on the University’s first quality audit by the Australian Universities Quality Agency (AUQA),released in 2007, an Action Plan to address matters identified in the report was developed. Monitoring of implementation of the planned actions, with associated updates of progress reports in achieving the plan, continued throughout 2008 and 2009.

In 2009, reviews were conducted for the following operational areas of the University:

  • Information Technology Services
  • Strategic Information and Analysis Unit
  • Academic Board and its Standing Committees
  • Student Administrative Processes and Practices

The quality system is published online at www.usc.edu.au/quality

Controlled entities

University Council approved a Policy for the Establishment and Operation of Controlled Entities in December 2006.

Innovation Centre

The University established the Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast Pty Ltd (ICSC) on 26 October 2000, under the University of the Sunshine Coast Act 1998 Part 2(6). The Chief Executive Officer of Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast (ICSC) Pty Ltd reports directly to the Vice-Chancellor, who is Chair of the Board of ICSC Pty Ltd.

The company’s mission is to support the start-up and growth of knowledge-based businesses and to promote beneficial interaction between these businesses and the University.

ICSC operates a major office facility on the edge of campus. This includes an award-winning Business Incubator, aimed at start-up companies, and a Business Accelerator aimed at more established businesses and professional service firms.

The IC Business Incubator and Accelerator are the first two phases in the development of the Business and Technology Precinct at Sippy Downs which has the long term potential to provide employment for 8,000-plus knowledge workers.

ICSC is working closely with public and private stakeholders in advancing plans for the development of the Sippy Downs Town Centre, particularly the Business and Technology Precinct.

To date, the Innovation Centre has supported the start-up and growth of more than 55 businesses, principally in the digital, clean-tech and creative industry sectors.

Activities in 2009
  • In February 2009, the Innovation Centre supported the Faculty of Business in the launch of a Minor in Entrepreneurship—this consists of four courses enabling students to build the skills and attitudes necessary to gain an entrepreneurial approach to business.
  • The Innovation Centre continued to build its UniConnect program which promotes beneficial relationships between the University and Innovation Centre companies. Strong progress was made through the appointment of a Student Ambassador who identified and promoted opportunities for work experience, student project groups and internships within Innovation Centre companies.
  • The Innovation Centre secured the support of Westpac as sponsor of the Enterprise Tuesday and Boardroom Briefing series for 20092011. Around 365 people attended these business development and networking events in 2009.
  • The second annual ‘Digital Futures’ course was held in September 2009 and attracted 52 delegates, including six USC students who gained award places.
  • The establishment of the Innovation Centre was included as a case study in the Partnerships @ Work publication, released by the Business/Higher Education Round Table in October. The University was one of 12 case studies selected from around the country.
  • At the end of 2009, the Innovation Centre was providing an office base to 30 knowledge-based businesses. The majority of these have benefited from engagement with the University through student projects, internships, graduate recruitment, input to teaching and curriculum, and research collaborations.

The Innovation Centre maintains an online presence at www.innovationcentre.com.au

Statutory obligations

Ethical standards

In compliance with the Public Sector Ethics Act 1994, the University’s Code of Conduct defines acceptable conduct for those studying and working at the University. Guidance falls under five main headings:

  • respect for the law and system of government;
  • respect for persons;
  • integrity;
  • diligence; and
  • economy and efficiency.

The Code of Conduct is published at www.usc.edu.au/codeofconduct and on the USC Portal for staff and students to access.

Information privacy

In 2009, the University developed a new Information Privacy Policy in response to the enactment of Queensland’s Information Privacy Act 2009. The Information Privacy Policy replaced the existing Privacy Plan. A privacy statement is provided on the University’s website and appropriate privacy statements are included on all University forms.

The Information Privacy Policy is available at www.usc.edu.au/privacypolicy

Right to Information

In response to the enactment of Queensland’s Right to Information Act 2009, the University developed a new Right to Information Policy, replacing the former Freedom of Information Policy. In compliance with the legislation, the University has a Publication Scheme on its website, setting out the classes of information publicly available.

The following Right to Information requests were received in 2009:

  • 31 October: Request from the Courier Mail seeking information about overseas travel expenses of senior University staff, in particular how the money was spent. The information was collated for supply to the Courier Mail in January 2010.
  • 11 November: Request from an individual asking for copies of training material provided to University staff in 2006 by an external consultant. The request was refused on the grounds that the information requested was exempt because of potential breach of confidence.

The Publication Scheme is available at www.usc.edu.au/rti

Whistleblowers

No actions, disclosures or complaints were made in 2009 under the Whistleblowers Protection Act 1994.

Workforce planning, retention and turnover

Time Equivalent (FTE) staffing was 660, inclusive of casual staff. This was an eight percent increase on 2008, with growth consistent with the University’s Workforce Planning process. The 2008* staff retention rate was 84 percent. The 2008 separation rate was 11.4 percent, a decrease of 0.4 percent on 2007. The Staff Plan (2009-2011) addresses the University’s strategies in planning, attracting, developing and retaining its workforce.

The University also has a Certified Agreement and a number of key policies and procedures related to workforce development and management. These can be located at www.usc.edu.au/staff

Workplace health and safety

In 2008, USC time lost to injury was 6.59 days per workers’ compensation incident, with a total of 11 claims made during the year.*

* Due to DEEWR reporting deadlines, 2008 figures are the most recent available.

Retrenchments and voluntary early retirement

In 2009, the University made three positions redundant, and made no offers of Voluntary Early Retirement.

Negotiations for Certified Agreement 4

Negotiations for the University’s fourth Certified Agreement commenced in April 2009 and continued on a fortnightly basis over the remainder of the year. Although the Certified Agreement was not resolved during the year, the University still made an administrative pay increase of four percent for all staff in March 2009. Negotiations will continue in 2010.

The Certified Agreement is available at www.usc.edu.au/certifiedagreement

Corporate information systems and records management

The continuing development of the University’s corporate information systems included the following activities in 2009:

  • Student information system (PeopleSoft Campus Community): upgraded in 2008 with continued development in 2009
  • Human Resources and Payroll (PeopleSoft): upgraded in 2009
  • Finance system (Technology One): implemented in November 2009
  • Records management system (RecFind): upgraded in 2009
  • Library system (Virtua): upgraded in 2009
  • Research information management system (ResearchMaster): implemented in 2009
  • USC Research Bank (VTLS Vital): upgraded in 2009
  • Corporate website content management system: solution selected 2009 for implementation in 2010
  • Career placement (SONIA): implemented 2009/2010 international relations information system (IRIS): redeveloped 2009/2010
  • Learning management, community and content management systems (Blackboard): upgraded in 2009
  • Web conferencing system (Adobe Connect): upgraded in 2009
  • Lecture recording and streaming system (Mediasite): extended and upgraded in 2009
  • Email Server and Webmail system (GroupWise): upgraded in 2009
  • Directory services and identity management system (Novell): upgraded in 2009

Other significant systems within the University include:

  • Celcat: timetabling system
  • Nortel: telephone system
  • Raiser’s Edge: customer relationship management system for donors, alumni and friends of the University
  • Cardax: security card and access control system
  • CareerHub: careers and employment management
  • MEX: capital asset maintenance management
  • Leisure Management: gymnasium and leisure management system
  • Cumulus: multimedia asset catalogue and storage system
  • Bear printing: student printing system

Under the Public Records Act 2002, the University archives full and accurate records of its activities. The University operates a decentralised corporate records management model, with faculties and cost centres responsible for the management of their records. A central Records Management Services unit provides University-wide support and advice. Records Liaison Officers have been appointed in each faculty/cost centre to manage their respective records. Internal audits are conducted on a rolling schedule to ensure appropriate records management and staff training is undertaken on a regular basis.

Financial Report

Overseas travel expenditure
Chancellery
EmployeePositionDestinationReason for travelDepart dateDays awayReturn date$ Cost
Dobson J Chancellor Malaysia Graduation ceremony 11-Aug-09 6 16-Aug-09 6,880.31
Dobson J Chancellor Suva Fiji Graduation ceremony and alumni dinner 08-Nov-09 7 14-Nov-09 3,057.41
Elliot R, Professor Pro Vice-Chancellor (International and Quality) France Agent and institutional visits for student recruitment 08-Jan-09 18 25-Jan-09 19,196.56
Elliot R, Professor Pro Vice-Chancellor (International and Quality) South Africa and Spain Partner institution and agent visits and EAIE conference 03-Sep-09 20 22-Sep-09 14,418.38
Elliot R, Professor Pro Vice-Chancellor (International and Quality) Turkey and Austria NICE Network Conference, marketing and recruitment 22-Jun-09 15 06-Jul-09 16,331.72
Hefferan M, Professor Pro Vice-Chancellor (Regional Engagement) Indonesia and Canada Visit universities in USA 17-Aug-09 21 06-Sep-09 14,283.93
Thomas P, Professor Vice-Chancellor and President Copenhagen and United Kingdom OECD Conference, and visit UK universities 26-Jun-09 25 20-Jul-09 26,939.44
Thomas P, Professor Vice-Chancellor and President Singapore Higher Education Summit 2009 27-Oct-09 4 30-Oct-09 7,068.99
Thomas P, Professor Vice-Chancellor and President Barcelona ICDE Standing Conference of Presidents 2009 16-Nov-09 7 22-Nov-09 16,246.01
Capital Programs and Operations
EmployeePositionDestinationReason for travelDepart dateDays awayReturn date$ Cost
Benham G, Mr General Hand New Zealand TEFMA Grounds Workshop 20-Oct-09 2 21-Oct-09 813.69
Bradley M, Mr Director CPO New Zealand TEFMA Board meeting and visit universities 21-Mar-09 3 23-Mar-09 1,490.68
Bray D, Mr Technical Officer New Zealand TEFMA Grounds Workshop 20-Oct-09 2 21-Oct-09 2,106.38
Campbell A, Miss Personal Assistant New Zealand Essential Finance Skills for EA’s and PS’s 05-Aug-09 4 08-Aug-09 3,347.86
McIntyre J, Ms Project Officer New Zealand TEFMA Contract Management Course 23-Mar-09 2 24-Mar-09 3,268.87

Maguire R, Mr
Manager, Operations Los Angeles and Canada Campus Crisis Simulation Course 23-Feb-09 12 06-Mar-09 10,047.76
Maguire R, Mr Manager, Operations New Zealand TEFMA Planning Meeting 07-Oct-09 4 10-Oct-09 1,156.45
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
EmployeePositionDestinationReason for travelDepart dateDays awayReturn date$ Cost
Baldwin C, Dr Lecturer in Planning Austria and Amsterdam Presenting paper at two conferences 29-Jun-09 28 26-Jul-09 8,754.14
Bussey M, Mr Lecturer in History and Research Fellow Trollhattan, Sweden Participate in seminar at University West Sweden 29-May-09 18 15-Jun-09 3,398.42
Crew G, Dr Associate Professor in Creative Writing New Zealand Presentation of conference paper 25-Nov-09 6 30-Nov-09 1,693.67
Forsyth J, Mr Associate Lecturer in Creative Writing New Zealand Presentation of conference paper 25-Nov-09 6 30-Nov-09 1,558.09
HanUSCh F, Dr Lecturer in Journalism New Zealand Present at seminar NZ Tourism Research Institute 20-Sep-09 7 26-Sep-09 1,435.97
Jones C, Dr Senior Lecturer in Interactive Digimedia New Zealand Conference Computer Science Week 2009 20-Jan-09 4 23-Jan-09 943.08

Katsikitis M, Dr
Professor of Psychology Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Attend First World Congress on Positive Psychology 10-Jun-09 18 (7 non USC) 27-Jun-09 9,357.71
Lovell G, Dr Lecturer in Psychology New Zealand Attend and present at seminar NZ Sports and Medicine Conference 09 12-Nov-09 4 15-Nov-09 1,651.14
Mahnken P, Dr Lecturer in Indonesian Papua and Lombok Indonesia Workshop and meetings for scholarships 12-Jan-09 15 26-Jan-09 2,895.30
Matthews J, Dr Associate Professor in Social Sciences and Director of Research Japan and China Incoming Exchange Professor to Toyo University and attending APAIE Conference 14-Apr-09 30 13-May-09 5,758.74
Peake S, Dr Faculty Administration Manager South Africa International conference plus visits to national parks on behalf of IR 04-Jun-09 25 (3 non USC) 28-Jun-09 2,700.20
Peake S, Dr Faculty Administration Manager Amsterdam Representing USC at International Week and Teaching 19-Apr-09 13 01-May-09 3,796.14
Ricatti F, Dr Lecturer in Italian New Zealand Love and Its Histories: Italian Perspectives Symposium and Biennial ACIS Conference 15-Feb-09 8 22-Feb-09 1,763.43
Ricatti F, Dr Lecturer in Italian London and Rome Co-organising the Annual Conference of ASMI and research 24-Nov-09 21 14-Dec-09 3,240.49
Todd K, Mr Senior Lecturer in Design Germany and Italy Visit partner institutions and present paper at International Arts and Society Conference 18-Jul-09 17 03-Aug-09 5,765.46

Todd K, Mr
Senior Lecturer in Design New York Present USC at 15 Study Abroad Fairs at SUNY campuses 09-Sep-09 26 04-Oct-09 5,828.16
Watkins R, Mr Sessional New Zealand Presentation of conference paper 25-Nov-09 6 30-Nov-09 1,558.09
Weeks D, Dr Lecturer in Japanese and International Relations Japan PDP - collaborating with colleagues and document and archival research 02-May-09 23 24-May-09 1,845.32
Faculty of Business
EmployeePositionDestinationReason for travelDepart dateDays awayReturn date$ Cost
Alexander R, Dr Senior Lecturer in Economics New Zealand Travel to Australia to commence employment with USC 22-Oct-09 60 20-Dec-09 4,539.00
Anwar S, Dr Professor of Finance and Financial Planning India QS MBA World Tour 26-Nov-09 14 09-Dec-09 9,508.39

Anwar S, Dr
Professor of Finance and Financial Planning Taiwan Research meetings as part of Seed Research Grant 15-Dec-09 7 21-Dec-09 3,376.34
Burns R, Dr Sessional Suva Fiji Teaching at TPAF and AUQA Audit 22-Jul-09 10 (2 non USC) 31-Jul-09 2,190.14
Douglas E, Professor Dean, Faculty of Business Florida AACSB Conference 26-Apr-09 5 30-Apr-09 4,909.36
Douglas E, Professor Dean, Faculty of Business Thailand Teaching Consultancy at The Sasin Graduate Institute 14-Jun-09 27 (10 return to campus) 20-Jul-09 2,417.19
Douglas E, Professor Dean, Faculty of Business Chicago 2009 Academy of Management 69th Annual Meeting 06-Aug-09 7 12-Aug-09 5,316.83
Douglas E, Professor Dean, Faculty of Business Thailand 5th AAPBS Annual Conference 2009 03-Nov-09 5 07-Nov-09 2,464.09
Douglas E, Professor Dean, Faculty of Business Thailand AACSB - Sasin Accreditation Review Panel 15-Nov-09 4 18-Nov-09 2,940.73
Dye A, Miss Administrative Officer Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Graduation ceremony and alumni dinner 13-Aug-09 5 17-Aug-09 1,355.98
Freeman J, Mrs Lecturer in International Business Seoul, South Korea Accompany 14 students - Export Management practical and Seafood CRC Research 13-Sep-09 12 24-Sep-09 2,326.88
Freeman J, Mrs Lecturer in International Business Bangkok and Vietnam QS World MBA Tour 18-Nov-09 11 28-Nov-09 4,105.50
Harker M, Dr Associate Professor in Marketing UK and Germany Research meetings and Academy of Marketing Conference 01-Jul-09 36 (7 non USC) 05-Aug-09 7,489.25
Harker D, Dr Associate Professor in Marketing UK and Germany Research meetings and Academy of Marketing Conference 01-Jul-09 36 (7 non USC) 05-Aug-09 7,489.24
Hefferan M, Professor Professor, Property and Development Fiji TPAF Graduation Ceremony 08-Nov-09 7 (3 non USC) 14-Nov-09 3,621.94
Kerr D, Dr Associate Professor in Information Systems USA Meetings with USC partner universities and attend conference 05-Nov-09 17 21-Nov-09 7,334.66
Lawley M, Dr Associate Professor in Marketing Suva Fiji Teaching at TPAF 23-Feb-09 5 27-Feb-09 2,163.29
Lawley M, Dr Associate Professor in Marketing India and China MBA World Tour 09-Jul-09 13 21-Jul-09 8,990.76
Murray P, Dr Associate Professor in Human Resource Management China MBA World Tour 08-Nov-09 10 17-Nov-09 6,085.91
Parle G, Ms Associate Lecturer in Accounting and Finance Munich Meeting with PhD supervisor 15-Feb-09 10 24-Feb-09 2,115.62
Sharma B, Dr Senior Lecturer in Management Nepal and India MBA World Tour 19-Jan-09 16 03-Feb-09 13,658.10
Faculty of Science, Health and Education
EmployeePositionDestinationReason for travelDepart dateDays awayReturn date$ Cost
Allen W, Dr Lecturer in Education Jakarta Research consultancy work 17-May-09 6 22-May-09 2,307.58
Allen W, Dr Lecturer in Education Jakarta Research consultancy and pre-departure work with AusAID 27-Jun-09 7 03-Jul-09 1,906.69

Allen W, Dr
Lecturer in Education USA and Canada Graduate Diploma in Education Marketing 20-Oct-09 10 29-Oct-09 1,768.15
Anderson K, Ms Sessional Hong Kong Fish Reproduction Conference 18-Jun-09 8 25-Jun-09 1,117.52
Aspland T, Dr Professor of Education Singapore Carrick Research 11-Mar-09 4 14-Mar-09 1,917.77
Aspland T, Dr Professor of Education Frankfurt EERA Conference 20-Sep-09 14 (2 non USC) 03-Oct-09 2,385.54
Baillie L, Miss Lecturer in Nutrition and Dietetics Bangkok ICN Presentation of Abstract 26-Sep-09 16 11-Oct-09 1,790.36
Barnes M, Dr Associate Professor in Nursing United Kingdom Nutrition and Nurture in Infancy and Childhood Conference 29-Aug-09 22 (5 non USC) 19-Sep-09 4,989.01
Brooks P, Dr Senior Lecturer in Biological Chemistry New Zealand Presenting Seminar and Research Collaboration 15-Sep-09 11 (6 non USC) 25-Sep-09 1,101.57
Burford S, Ms Manager, International Projects Group Jakarta and Papua New Guinea Follow up visit for AusAID ALAF program 24-Oct-09 7 30-Oct-09 3,432.14

Burford S, Ms
Manager, International Projects Group Jakarta Meeting with AusAID 14-Dec-09 7 20-Dec-09 3,115.34
Burford S, Ms Manager, International Projects Group Papua New Guinea and Lombok, Indonesia Workshop and meetings for scholarships 12-Jan-09 15 26-Jan-09 6,818.55
Burkett B, Dr Associate Professor in Biomechanics Germany International Paralympic Committee Swimming Summit 30-May-09 9 07-Jun-09 3,641.61
Burnett S, Dr Lecturer in Wildlife Ecology South Africa SAN Parks Conference and Research 15-Apr-09 22 06-May-09 4,560.90
Carey M, Dr Academic Skills Advisor Jakarta and Papua New Guinea AusAID ALAF Program follow up visit 24-Oct-09 7 30-Oct-09 3,391.99
Carter J, Dr Senior Lecturer in Geography Port Villa Vanuatu Research work 30-Mar-09 6 04-Apr-09 2,791.81
Carter J, Dr Senior Lecturer in Geography Papua New Guinea Research and meetings 09-Nov-09 5 13-Nov-09 2,489.38
Dann C, Mr Lecturer in Professional Studies Fiji Supervision of Field Experience for Education students 22-Nov-09 9 30-Nov-09 1,500.00
Elizur A, Dr Professor of Aquaculture Biotechnology Italy EU SELFDOTT Tuna Workshop 01-Mar-09 9 09-Mar-09 3,934.38
Elizur A, Dr Professor of Aquaculture Biotechnology Hong Kong Fish Reproduction and Development Satellite Conference 18-Jun-09 7 24-Jun-09 2,545.20
Elizur A, Dr Professor of Aquaculture Biotechnology Tokyo To learn how to do germ cell transplantations in fish 01-Aug-09 14 14-Aug-09 2,641.90
Framp A, Ms Lecturer in Nursing New Zealand Australian Nurse Educators Conference 2009 30-Sep-09 5 (2 non USC) 04-Oct-09 1,020.86
Greber C, Mr Senior Lecturer in Occupational Therapy New Zealand Attend ANZ Committee Occupational Therapy Educators Conference and fieldwork meeting 26-May-09 5 30-May-09 1,489.00

Hyde M, Dr
Professor of Education Jakarta Meeting with Government officials 26-Jan-09 6 31-Jan-09 2,974.24
Hyde M, Dr Professor of Education Jakarta and Papua New Guinea Follow up for AusAID ALAF Program 24-Oct-09 7 30-Oct-09 2,031.03
Hyde M, Dr Professor of Education Jakarta Meeting with Aus AID 14-Dec-09 7 20-Dec-09 3,115.34
Hyde M, Dr Professor of Education Bali Meeting with Willi Toisuta Associates 26-Mar-09 7 01-Apr-09 1,424.17
Lowe B, Ms Senior Lecturer in Education China Evaluate a possible WPL site and discuss Science/Math programs in Education 06-Apr-09 12 (3 non USC) 17-Apr-09 1,935.52

Lowe J, Professor
Head of School Kota Bharu Kelantan Malaysia 4th APCESS and 8th ISSC 2009 Conference 13-Jul-09 6 18-Jul-09 6,418.18
Lowe J, Professor Head of School New Orleans SOPHE Conference / Elsevier Publisher 29-Apr-09 14 12-May-09 11,352.23
Lowe J, Professor Head of School USA SOPHE Conference, AHPA 137 Annual Meeting, and meet with Elsevier Publisher 05-Nov-09 13 17-Nov-09 13,041.36
Lowe J, Professor Head of School Ukraine Research collaboration meetings 13-Jun-09 13 25-Jun-09 10,858.02
Massaro C, Ms Sessional New Zealand COMBIO 2009 Conference 06-Dec-09 5 10-Dec-09 848.86
Mayes G, Dr Regional Engagement Coordinator Fiji Pilot Research Project 09-Jun-09 5 13-Jun-09 1,587.34
McAllister M, Dr Associate Professor in Nursing Canada In Sickness and In Health Conference 2009 11-Apr-09 9 19-Apr-09 6,651.82
McKay D, Dr Senior Lecturer in Biotechnology USA Teaching exchange and meetings 21-Mar-09 37 (14 non USC) 26-Apr-09 9,276.01
Mellifont R, Dr Lecturer in Sports Science Cape Town South Africa International Society of Biomechanics 03-Jul-09 9 11-Jul-09 2,740.40
Meyers N, Professor Head of School Jakarta and Papua New Guinea Follow up for AusAID ALAF Program and meetings with Papuan Government 24-Oct-09 7 30-Oct-09 4,263.09
Meyers N, Professor Head of School Indonesia International Biodiversity Conference 10-Nov-09 6 15-Nov-09 2,961.84
Meyers N, Professor Head of School Copenhagen UN Climate Change Conference 13-Dec-09 9 21-Dec-09 5,589.70
Nagel M, Dr Senior Lecturer in Education Barcelona 16th International Conference on Learning 25-Jun-09 11 05-Jul-09 6,451.53
O’Hara L, Ms Lecturer in Public Health USA Attend NAAFA conference and present at ASDAH conference 30-Jul-09 7 05-Aug-09 2,987.19
Oliver J, Ms Research Officer Fiji Pilot Research Project 09-Jun-09 5 13-Jun-09 1,587.34
Parkes-Sandri R, Ms Lecturer in Education United Kingdom Attend conference and post conference meetings 10-Sep-09 16 25-Sep-09 1,783.52
Pelly F, Dr Senior Lecturer in Nutrition and Dietetics USA American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting and PINES board meeting 21-May-09 11 31-May-09 3,325.62
Ramawati N, Ms Project Assistant Jakarta Predeparture sessions for AusAID ALA Fellows for 10 week course at USC 26-Jun-09 8 03-Jul-09 1,441.40
Robertson A, Ms Project Officer Jayapura, Indonesia Papuan Project - Teacher Training 16-Jan-09 12 27-Jan-09 2,327.20
Rowe J, Dr Senior Lecturer in Nursing Canada NCAST-AVENUW Conference, PR and recruitment of international students 30-Aug-09 25 (13 non USC) 23-Sep-09 1,709.48
Roy S, Ms Sessional New Zealand ASCILITE Conference 05-Dec-09 6 10-Dec-09 1,542.07
Ryan E, Ms Associate Lecturer in Sustainability Education Canada Presentation of paper at international conference 09-May-09 9 17-May-09 2,439.12
Shapcott A, Dr Senior Lecturer in Plant and Vegetable Ecology Madagascar Research work 22-Aug-09 38 28-Sep-09 4,529.15
Smith T, Dr Professor of Sustainability Science and Director, Sustainability Research Centre Lisbon Speaking engagement at conference 12-Apr-09 11 22-Apr-09 6,952.03
Smith T, Dr Professor of Sustainability Science and Director, Sustainability Research Centre Fiji Pilot Research Project 09-Jun-09 5 13-Jun-09 1,920.71
Thomsen D, Dr Lecturer in Sustainability Advocacy Lisbon Presenting and speaking at conference 12-Apr-09 11 22-Apr-09 5,939.28
Toohey E, Ms Lecturer in Education Fiji Supervision of wider field experience for education students 15-Nov-09 9 23-Nov-09 1,500.00
Wallace H, Dr Associate Professor in Agricultural Ecology Papua New Guinea Research work 27-Apr-09 5 01-May-09 2,143.31

Wallace H, Dr
Associate Professor in Agricultural Ecology Vanuatu Research work 16-Sep-09 9 (2 non USC) 24-Sep-09 4,429.14
Wallace H, Dr Associate Professor in Agricultural Ecology Papua New Guinea Research and meetings 09-Nov-09 5 13-Nov-09 2,337.36
Wallace H, Dr Associate Professor in Agricultural Ecology New Zealand Postharvest Pacifica 2009 Conference 17-Nov-09 4 20-Nov-09 2,437.95
Warrick R, Professor Professor, Climate Change Adaptation New Zealand Meeting 05-Oct-09 3 07-Oct-09 721.68
Warrick R, Professor Professor, Climate Change Adaptation New Zealand Workshop 18-Nov-09 2 19-Nov-09 862.03
Young K, Mr Lecturer in Education Barcelona 16th International Conference on Learning 27-Jun-09 14 (3 non USC) 10-Jul-09 2,783.60
Information Technology Services
EmployeePositionDestinationReason for travelDepart dateDays awayReturn date$ Cost

Henderson P, Mr
Corporate Systems Coordinator New Zealand CAUDIT Enterprise Architecture Symposium 2009 21-Nov-09 15 (10 non USC) 05-Dec-09 1,544.86
Strategic Information Analysis Unit
EmployeePositionDestinationReason for travelDepart dateDays awayReturn date$ Cost
Best T, Mrs Strategic Information Analyst Lithuania European Higher Education Society (EAIR) Forum 21-Aug-09 10 (2 non USC) 30-Aug-09 5,104.73
Wirgau O, Mr Strategic Information Analyst USA National Symposium of Student Retention 28-Sep-09 11 (5 non USC) 08-Oct-09 3,883.88
Teaching and Research Services
EmployeePositionDestinationReason for travelDepart dateDays awayReturn date$ Cost
Lynch K, Dr Associate Professor in ICT Research and Development Uganda International Conference on Computing and ICT Research 29-Jul-09 19 (2 non USC) 16-Aug-09 442.90
Palmer B, Mrs Manager Office of Research New Zealand ARMS 2009 Conference 13-Sep-09 7 (2 non USC) 19-Sep-09 2,539.24
Stewart K, Ms Grants Officer New Zealand ARMS 2009 Conference 13-Sep-09 7 (2 non USC) 19-Sep-09 2,357.38
USC International
EmployeePositionDestinationReason for travelDepart dateDays awayReturn date$ Cost
Batzloff J, Mrs Admissions Officer USA NAFSA 2009 Annual Conference and Expo 22-May-09 10 31-May-09 7,980.93
Batzloff J, Mrs Admissions Officer Austria and Germany IRH face-to-face marketing activities 2009 11-Nov-09 16 26-Nov-09 13,332.01
Boon M, Miss Recruitment Officer Scandinavia Kilroy Roadshow Recruitment Fairs 28-Aug-09 16 12-Sep-09 9,178.88
Davey J, Mrs Program Administrator Baltimore and USA Work with Partner university and meetings with potential partners 21-Mar-09 37 (14 non USC) 26-Apr-09 2,595.83
Eckard L, Ms Recruitment Officer Germany Visit to German partner universities 04-May-09 19 22-May-09 8,117.43
Eckard L, Ms Recruitment Officer Germany Visit to German partner universities for student recruitment 27-Oct-09 33 28-Nov-09 12,181.84
HanUSCh F, Dr Lecturer in Journalism Austria, Germany, Switzerland and France Travel for USC International, including conference attendance 10-Nov-09 21 30-Nov-09 6,371.76

Hardy D, Ms
Admissions and Recruitment Officer Malaysia, Penang, Singapore IDP Recruitment Program 04-Jan-09 9 12-Jan-09 17,726.30
Mayes G, Dr Regional Engagement Coordinator Germany and Austria International Week, teaching Masters of Tourism program (Vienna) 01-May-09 18 18-May-09 2,508.22
Readman K, Ms Lecturer in Education Canada Canadian education fairs 19-Mar-09 15 02-Apr-09 9,049.83
Scott T, Mr Recruitment Officer India, Singapore, Nepal Marketing, spot offers, IDP agents 11-Apr-09 15 25-Apr-09 8,657.55
Scott T, Mr Recruitment Officer Taiwan, Vietnam, Singapore Marketing, agent visits, fair and IDP Open Day 16-May-09 17 01-Jun-09 7,409.27
Scott T, Mr Recruitment Officer Singapore, India, Nepal Marketing, recruitment and IDP exhibitions 18-Aug-09 23 09-Sep-09 13,072.44
Scott T, Mr Recruitment Officer Malaysia AusEd-UniEd Malaysia study fairs and agent and institution visits 14-Oct-09 11 24-Oct-09 5,081.09
Scott T, Mr Recruitment Officer Taiwan Austrade Taiwan 19-Sep-09 15 (4 non USC) 03-Oct-09 6,593.48
Solomon K, Miss Director of Studies Kuala Lumpur IELTS Administrators Conference 31-Aug-09 6 (2 non USC) 05-Sep-09 1,448.41
Tamba E, Ms Director, International Relations Korea and Japan Exhibition/Conference, agent visits 13-Mar-09 19 31-Mar-09 9,408.95
Tamba E, Ms Director, International Relations Japan, Korea and China Student recruitment, participation in APEI Conference, Sunlin College Anniversary 11-Apr-09 16 26-Apr-09 10,223.12
Tamba E, Ms Director, International Relations Japan and USA NAFSA Conference 20-May-09 20 (2 non USC) 08-Jun-09 12,579.38
Tamba E, Ms Director, International Relations Spain, Korea and Japan EAIE Conference 12-Sep-09 21 (2 non USC) 02-Oct-09 17,000.75

Tamba E, Ms
Director, International Relations China, Japan and Korea Student recruitment 14-Oct-09 22 04-Nov-09 32,456.16
Vuille J, Ms Admissions and Recruitment Officer Japan, Korea and China Student recruitment, participation in APEI Conference and Sunlin College Anniversary 08-Apr-09 16 23-Apr-09 16,510.70
White G, Mr Associate Director, Recruitment USA and Mexico Marketing and USC educational services 20-Mar-09 22 10-Apr-09 8,393.63
White G, Mr Associate Director, Recruitment USA NAFSA Conference and marketing 21-May-09 23 (12 non USC) 12-Jun-09 7,603.83
White G, Mr Associate Director, Recruitment France, Germany, Denmark Agent USC partner plus student affairs 13-Nov-09 28 10-Dec-09 13,392.42
White G, Mr Associate Director, Recruitment South Africa and Europe EAIE Conference, institutional and research partner visits 04-Sep-09 37 10-Oct-09 19,614.49
Williams B, Mr International Programs and Pathways Coordinator Singapore Study in Australia: Diploma to Degree Open Day 21-Aug-09 5 25-Aug-09 1,871.14


Total $823,107.11

Glossary

AGS Australian Graduate Survey (Government)
ALTC Australian Learning and Teaching Council
APT Administrative, Professional and Technical (Staff)
ARMC Audit and Risk Management Committee (University)
AUQA Australian Universities Quality Agency
CEQ Course Experience Questionnaire (Government)
CGS Commonwealth Grant Scheme (Government)
CHASE Centre for Healthy Activities, Sport and Exercise (University)
CPO Capital Programs and Operations (University)
CRICOS Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students
DEEWR Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (previously the Department of Education, Science and Training)
DIISR Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research
EIF Education Investment Fund (Government)
ESD Environmentally Sustainable Development—related to master planning for enhancing ecological values, and construction and rehabilitation projects incorporating principles of ‘green buildings’, space usage, energy use, water, waste and natural environmental components
EFTSL Equivalent Full-Time Student Load FTE Full-time equivalent (Staff)
HDR Higher Degree by Research (Student)
HERDC Higher Education Research Data Collection (Government)
ICSC Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast
ICT Information and Communication Technology
IFP International Foundation Pathway (University) ITS Information Technology Services (University)
LTMC Learning and Teaching Management Committee (University)
LTPF Learning and Teaching Performance Fund
NICP National Indigenous Cadetship Program
PPR Performance, Planning and Review (Staff)
PRC Planning and Resources Committee (University)
QTAC Queensland Tertiary Admissions Centre
RTI Right to Information
SFC Student Feedback on Courses
SFT Student Feedback on Teaching T&R Teaching and Research (Staff)
TEFMA Australasian Tertiary Education Facilities Management Association
TEP Tertiary Enabling Pathway (University)
T NE Transnational Enrolments (University)
TPP Tertiary Preparation Pathway (University)
USC University of the Sunshine Coast
VER Voluntary Early Retirement
VET Vocational Education and Training
WIL Work Integrated Learning (University)
YTD Year To Date

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