Annual Report 2011 (text only version)

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Report of the Council of the University of the Sunshine Coast

For the period 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2011

29 February 2012

The Hon Cameron Dick MP

Minister for Education and Industrial Relations

In accordance with the provisions of the Financial Accountability Act 2009 and the Financial and Performance Management Standard 2009, and the detailed requirements set out in the Annual Report Requirements for Queensland Government Agencies (June 2011), I have the honour to present to you, on behalf of the Council of the University of the Sunshine Coast, the Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2011.

John M Dobson OAM

Chancellor

Acknowledgment of country

The University of the Sunshine Coast acknowledges the Gubbi Gubbi people as the traditional owners and custodians of the land on which the campus stands, and recognises the strength, resilience and capacity of Aboriginal people in this land.

The University has a Reconciliation Action Plan (2009-2011) to guide its relationships, opportunities and progress reporting with regard to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Communication objectives

This annual report meets the reporting requirements of the Queensland Minister for Education and Industrial Relations.

The University of the Sunshine Coast’s 2011 annual report provides a record of the University’s performance in 2011, its plans for the future, and audited financial statements. All achievements for 2011 are documented against the goals and corresponding key performance indicators of the University’s Strategic Plan (2011–2015).

Potential readers of the annual report include federal, state and local government representatives and officers, the University community (including staff and students), business and media, potential benefactors, international visitors and members of the public.

Copies of the 2011 annual report are available from the Office of Marketing and Communications, University of the Sunshine Coast, by telephoning +61 7 5459 4558 or faxing +61 7 5430 1187. The report is also available online at www.usc.edu.au/reports.

The University of the Sunshine Coast is committed to providing accessible services to people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. If you have difficulty understanding the annual report, contact the Office of Marketing and Communications on +61 7 5459 4558 to arrange an interpreter to effectively communicate the report to you.

University of the Sunshine Coast

90 Sippy Downs Drive

SIPPY DOWNS QLD 4556

AUSTRALIA

Tel: +61 7 5430 1234

Fax: +61 7 5430 1111

Email: information@usc.edu.au

Web: www.usc.edu.au

© University of the Sunshine Coast 2011

ISSN 1837-7521

Published by University of the Sunshine Coast March 2012.

Information contained in this publication was correct at the time of publishing. For the most up-to-date information about the University, visit www.usc.edu.au. All amounts are in Australian dollars. University of the Sunshine Coast is registered on the Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students. CRICOS Provider Number: 01595D.

Standing

On opening in 1996, the University of the Sunshine Coast became the first greenfield university to be established in Australia since 1975.The University serves the Sunshine Coast and impacts strongly on the economic and cultural development of the region.In its first 15 years as a new public university for the Sunshine Coast region, USC has demonstrated its viability in terms of student demand, enrolment growth, teaching and research outcomes, campus development, financial position, regional contribution and reputation.The early period of USC’s second 15 years will be characterised by naturally reinforcing themes. Deregulation of student enrolments, including a student-centred, demand-driven funding system from 2012 and targetsfor higher education participation and low-SES students, will impact on the University’s profile and teaching. Learning and teaching at USC will build on its existing reputation and become an exemplar of access and success in the Australian higher education sector. Opportunity will be provided over a broader region, and students and the wider community will have educational, cultural and economic possibilities well beyond current provision.Research outcomes and outputs will increase in both quantity and quality. Existing areas of research concentration will be strengthened through collaboration with the best researchers in these fields in Australia and internationally.Strategic partnerships will be expanded with related government agencies, industry and business. In addition, there will be substantially more applied research conducted with, and for the benefit of, the wider community.Rapid growth of the University and the region it serves presents a major challenge for USC’s institutional capacity and capability. Professional development of staff at all levels will be a priority, the University’s systems will undergo major reinvestments and core infrastructure will be expanded. Above all, development of strategic partnerships at regional, national and international levels will advance USC’s footprint, profile and performance.

Vision

The University of the Sunshine Coast is regionally relevant and recognised, nationally and internationally, for excellence in teaching, research and engagement.

Values

In pursuing its vision and conducting daily operations, the University is committed to:

  • creating and disseminating knowledge through innovative and effective teaching and research
  • fostering freedom of inquiry and expression
  • the process of lifelong learning
  • engaging in and responding to the region’s intellectual, cultural and economic challenges
  • adopting consultative processes and ethical behaviours in all activities
  • engendering respect throughout the University community
  • fairness, openness, honesty, trust and effective communication
  • developing the University and supporting the region as a sustainability exemplar
  • advancing human rights within a tolerant and inclusive community, in which respect for Indigenous peoples is fundamental

USC graduate Chris Raine was named Queensland’s Young Australian of the Year for 2012, for his work on an anti-binge drinking program to help change the drinking habits of young people. He travelled to Canberra in January 2012 to vie for the honour of being Young Australian of the Year. Three years ago another USC graduate, Jonty Bush, was Queensland’s Young Australian of the Year. Jonty, an anti-violence campaigner who was CEO of the Queensland Homicide Victims’ Support Group at the time, went on the win the Young Australian of the Year award for 2009.

Highlights

  • 2011 was the first year of operation under the new Strategic Plan (2011-2015).
  • On-campus student enrolments increased by seven percent in 2011. First preference applications for Semester 1, 2011 entry increased by five percent over 2010. Student enrolments in the Tertiary Preparation Pathway for Semester 1, 2011 were up 30 percent over 2010.
  • The University’s application for the Federal Government’s Structural Adjustment Fund was successful. USC received $24 million towards a $33 million project, to fund a major building for the Sippy Downs campus and a presence at the Gympie Wide Bay TAFE campus.
  • A variety of campus facilities were completed and/or officially opened in 2011: the 50-metre Olympic-standard swimming pool; the AEIOU Early Learning Centre; the new Science building; the Engineering and Science Training Facility.
  • The University’s successful Collaborative Research Network (CRN) funding bid of $5.45 million will see new research projects involving water, sustainability, forestry and aquaculture develop over the next three years with partner universities Griffith University, University of Tasmania, University of Queensland and Queensland University of Technology.
  • During 2011, USC was successful in securing the following support for research:
    • Australian Research Council Future Fellowship ($656,377)
    • Australian Research Council Project Grant ($145,000)
    • Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Researcher Award ($375,000)
    • National Health and Medical Research Award ($438,510)
    • National Health and Medical Research PhD Scholarship
    • Australian Research Grant Discovery project grant ($425,000) with Curtin University with a PhD student at USC
    • Three Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities grants with University of Queensland and Curtin University ($1,007,000)
    • Seafood CRC funding ($555,000)
    • Two Fulbright Senior Specialist Awards
  • For the third consecutive year, the Good Universities Guide confirmed USC as the only public university in Queensland to obtain fivestars for the quality of staff teaching. Four stars were achieved for graduate satisfaction.
  • The Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) awarded USC five prestigious learning and teaching citations, a national program award and a project grant.
  • Overall satisfaction among international students remained strong in 2011, with 84 percent of international students indicating satisfaction with their overall experience at USC in the i-graduate International Student Barometer.
  • The University became a founding member of the Regional Universities Network, alongside five other institutions.
  • The Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast received continued funding from the Queensland Government to support start-up, high-tech businesses.
  • 2011 saw two executive appointments commence in January: Professor Birgit Lohmann as Deputy Vice-Chancellor, and Professor Roland De Marco as foundation Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research).
  • A review of the academic structure resulted in a consolidation of three faculties to two. Professor Joanne Scott was appointed Executive Dean, Faculty of Arts and Business, and Professor John Bartlett was appointed Executive Dean, Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering. Both positions commence in January 2012.
  • John M Dobson OAM was re-elected as Chancellor by University Council. His appointment is for a period of five years.

Key five-year figures

Category 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Annual Trend (% change)
Students
Number of students 1 5,246 5,833 6,325 7,276 7,766 6.7%
Female 3,163 3,624 4,074 4,764 5,066 6.3%
Male 2,083 2,209 2,251 2,512 2,700 7.5%
On-campus students 4,750 5,383 6,092 7,148 7,640 6.9%
Undergraduate 3,810 4,239 4,826 5,701 6,142 7.7%
Postgraduate coursework 867 903 732 654 680 4.0%
Higher degree by research 100 118 129 140 141 0.7%
Non-award 469 573 638 781 803 2.8%
International (all students) 855 977 880 870 805 -7.5%
International (on campus) 527 674 766 855 789 -7.7%
Student load (EFTSL) 2 4131.4 4597.3 5332.7 6034.3 6429.5 6.5%
Degrees conferred
Undergraduate degrees conferred 592 591 656 1,027 981 -4.5%
Postgraduate coursework degrees conferred 492 654 569 583 484 -17.0%
Higher degree by research degrees conferred 13 11 12 25 20 -20.0%
Total degrees conferred 1,097 1,256 1,237 1,635 1,485 -9.2%
Equity
Disability 3 3.8% 3.5% 4.7% 5.6% 5.9% 0.3%
Indigenous 3 1.5% 1.6% 1.8% 1.4% 1.7% 0.3%
First in family to attend university 4 52.0% 52.4% 51.4% 49.5% 48.6% -0.9%
Staff (full-time equivalent, excluding casuals)
Academic staff 5 144 173 188 210 212 1.1%
Non-academic staff 6 280 295 329 351 388 10.4%
Total number of staff 7 423 468 517 561 600 6.9%
Proportion of academic staff with higher degree qualifications 85% 83% 77% 83% 82% -1.4%
Operating revenue (parent entity) $78.40m $94.98m $109.04m $121.05m $126.44m 4.5%
Property, plant and equipment $146.55m $165.31m $169.40m $167.17m $175.34m 4.9%
Research income 8 $2.99m $3.35m $4.27m $5.60m $4.54m 9 -18.9%
Research publications 10 120.96 196.74 177.11 167.15 n/a9 n/a n/a

1. Number of students is at Census 1, each year.
2. Student load includes inbound exchange students. EFTSL = Equivalent Full Time Student Load and for 2011 is based on preliminary data as at Census 2, 2011.
3. Disability and Indigenous percentages are as a proportion of domestic students only.
4. First in family percentages are as a proportion of undergraduate students only.
5. Academic (Vice-Chancellor; Deputy Vice-Chancellor; Teaching and Research (Level A-E) staff).
6. Non-academic (Administrative, Professional and Technical (APT) Level 1–10 staff; APT staff above award).
7. Data is based on figures supplied to DEEWR as at 31 March 2011.
8. Figures include research income reported to the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research (DIISR) through the Higher Education Research Data Collection (HERDC), as well as research funding received from DIISR.
9. HERDC figure for the year is not finalised and is unaudited.
10. Weighted calculation reported to DIISR in the HERDC. n/a = Data not yet available.

* Updated figures will be made available at www.usc.edu.au/reports.

Vice-Chancellor’s review

As you will see from the Highlights, 2011 was a successful year of continued growth forUSC.

While it is important to reflect on that success, it is also necessary to be focussed on the future.

In my first year as Vice-Chancellor, I believe we have set a strong foundation in 2011 for the next stage of development of this university.

Through a consultative process involving many people within and outside of USC, we developed a new Strategic Plan (2011-2015).

New members of the executive team who took up their appointments early in 2011, Deputy Vice-Chancellor Professor Birgit Lohmann and our first Pro Vice- Chancellor (Research) Roland De Marco, made strong contributions to this plan.

A revised academic structure, effective January 2012, and appointment of the new two executive deans, Professor Joanne Scott (Faculty of Arts and Business) and Professor John Bartlett (Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering) position us well for future growth and an enhanced national profile.

One of the performance measures in our strategic plan is for the University to have 12,000 students (8,000 EFTSL) by 2015, a significant increase on the 2011 student population of 7,766.

Compact discussions indicate the Commonwealth is keen to see Australia’s youngest public university reach this critical mass.

An important strategy for growth is the expansion of USC’s footprint from the immediate Sunshine Coast to service the coastal region from north of Brisbane to Bundaberg.

This strategy is predicated upon closer cooperation with TAFE in training, articulation and resource-sharing, and servicing the needs of the planned Sunshine Coast University Hospital.Growth requires new buildings and other infrastructure, and I am delighted that our joint application with TAFE to the Structural Adjustment Fund has resulted in significant Commonwealth funding for a $33 million Sippy Downs Learning Hub on campus, as well as a major higher education development on the TAFE campus at Gympie.

Other proposed campus developments are detailed in the Campus Master Plan which was also revised in 2011 (to be approved in 2012).Building a research profile in a new, small university is challenging, yet research is an important element of a university’s credibility.

The strides we have taken in 2011 are impressive, including the Collaborative Research Networks initiative ($5.5 million), several ARC and NHMRC grants, our continuing role in the Australian Seafood CRC and CRC for Forestry, and industry partnerships.

Every year, I am impressed by our student and graduate achievements, from university medallists to sporting achievers to success in business and the professions.

We now have more than 9,000 graduates working on the coast, nationally and around the world.The University’s strong national ratings for teaching quality and graduate satisfaction, and our strong performance in national awards for university teaching, reflect the dedication of our teaching staff and the personal attention they afford our students. I thank all staff for their outstanding efforts in 2011.

It is important to acknowledge the role of the University Council in ensuring our future.

In particular, it is gratifying that Chancellor John M Dobson OAM accepted re-appointment late in2011 for a further five-year term.

Professor Greg Hill

Vice-Chancellor and President

Institutional forward planning 2012
  • Implement the Collaborative Futures Project, with the Gympie Learning Hub complete for the start of 2013 and the Sippy DownsLearning Hub complete for the start of 2014.
  • Fully implement faculty restructure and change management project.
  • Complete Council, Executive and Senior Staff Planning Retreats.
  • Maintain engagement with the planning process for the Sunshine Coast University Hospital and the Skills and Academic Research Centre.
  • Refine strategies to ensure student load targets are met.
  • Maintain impetus of the research strategic priority and leverage off the Collaborative Research Network and project grant successes of 2011.
  • Build further momentum around student retention, student satisfaction and social inclusion agendas.
  • Invest in information technology resources for learning, teaching and research.
  • Commit to continual infrastructure construction as a result of ongoing growth in student load and research capacity.

Financial review

The University’s financial position continued to strengthen in 2011, as a result of increased student load, reductions in expenditure and increased research and consultancy efforts.

Results for the year included an operating surplus of $8.4 million, with an operating margin of 6.6%.

Income and expenditure

Total income for the year was $126.44 million – an increase of $5.39 million (four percent) on the previous year.

The increase was driven primarily by continued growth in Commonwealth-funded student places and the receipt of increased investment income.

Funds derived from government sources totalled $99.3 million or 78 percent of revenue (includes advance payments in relation to HECS-HELP funding but excludes up-front student fees).

This was an increase of $4.69 million (4.7 percent) on the previous year’s funding.Expenses for the year totalled $118.09 million – an increase of $12.84 million (12 percent) received in the previous year.

This can be attributed to an increase in employee benefits, due to the four percent administration wage increase in March 2011 and increase in provisioning for long service and annual leave due to ageing of the workforce.

In addition, a number of non-capitalised refurbishments and minor works were undertaken to achieve space management goals.

Asset growth

At year’s end, the University’s net assets totalled $188.31 million – $11.18 million (6.3 percent) more than in the previous year. This reflected the accumulation of cash reserves for future years’ capital expenditure and associated strategic initiatives.

Expenditure on consultancies
Category 2009 ($) 2010 ($) 2011 ($)
Professional / technical 1,973,408 2,955,547 3,500,440
Communications 1,100 1,560 0
Finance / accounting 58,255 68,746 10,061
Information technology 398,097 683,018 963,822
Human resource management 1,727 14,809 148,215
Management 130,478 122,538 128,752
General 48,620 0 0
Total 2,611,685 3,846,218 4,751,290

Organisation

Basis of authority

The institution was established under the Sunshine Coast University College Act 1994 and took its first students in 1996. Full university powers were granted under the University of the Sunshine Coast Act 1998.

Functions and powers

The University’s functions are to:

  • provide education at university standard;
  • provide facilities for, and encourage, study and research;
  • encourage the advancement and development of knowledge, and its application to government, industry, commerce and the community;
  • provide courses of study or instruction, at levels of achievement the Council considers appropriate, to meet the needs of the community;
  • confer higher education awards;
  • disseminate knowledge and promote scholarship;
  • provide facilities and resources for the wellbeing of the University’s staff, students and other persons undertaking courses at the University;
  • exploit commercially, for the University’s benefit, a facility or resource of the University, including, for example, study, research or knowledge, or
  • the practical application of study, research or knowledge, belonging to theUniversity, whether alone or with someone else; and
  • perform other functions given to the University under the Act or another Act.

The University’s powers are:Under the University of the Sunshine Coast Act 1998 the University has all the powers of an individual. It may, for example:

  1. enter into contracts;
    1. acquire, hold, dispose of, and deal with property;
    2. appoint agents and attorneys;
    3. engage consultants;
    4. fix charges, and other terms, for services and other facilities it supplies;ande) do anything else necessary or convenient to be done for its functions.
  2. Without limiting subsection (1), the University has the powers given to it under its Act or another Act.
  3. The University may exercise its powers inside and outside Queensland.
  4. Without limiting subsection (3), the University may exercise its powers outside Australia.

Strategic framework

The Strategic Plan is the University’s highest-level planning document, along with the Campus Master Plan.

The role of the strategic plan is to articulate the broad goals and aims of the University over the next five years.

Specific strategies complementing the Strategic Plan are set out in four top level plans,which apply University-wide and drive resource allocations through the budget process.

Supporting strategies guide the University’s involvement in international activities and regional engagement.

Operational plans for individual cost centres support initiatives outlined in both the strategic and top level plans.All plans are reviewed and updated during the budget and planning process in September each year.

The Strategic Plan underwent a consultative review in 2010 to facilitate the development of a new plan and corresponding performance indicators. The new Strategic Plan (2011-2015) took effect from 1 January 2011.

Annual review of operations

As a review of its operations each year, the University of the Sunshine Coast measures its progress according to the goals and key performance indicators for four areas, as outlined by the Strategic Plan (2011-2015):

  1. Enable access to the USC experience
  2. Deliver high quality teaching, learning and graduate outcomes
  3. Build research productivity and output significantly
  4. Develop USC for a sustainable future

This is the first report on the performance measures in the University’s new Strategic Plan. Baseline data has been reported for all performance measures, and assessment of performance has been made where the latest data is available.

The summary of key performance targets for the University is:

1. Enable access to the USC experience

1.1 12,000 students by 2015 (8,000 EFTSL) 12,000 students(8,000 EFTSL)
1.2 Low SES Participation 18.1% 18.5% 19.1% 19.7% 20%

2. Deliver high quality teaching, learning and graduate outcomes

2.1 Student Satisfaction National ranking in top quartile National ranking in top quartile National ranking in top quartile National ranking in top quartile National ranking in top quartile
2.2 Graduate Outcomes Progress towards national average Progress towards national average Progress towards national average Progress towards national average Achieve national average

3. Build research productivity and output significantly

3.1 Research Grants Income $3,600,000 $4,200,000 $4,800,000 $5,300,000 $6,000,000
3.2 Weighted Publications 190 200 210 230 250 points
3.3a HDR students (Load) 120 130 140 150 155 EFTSL
3.3b HDR students (% in selected areas of research strength) 45% 50% 55% 60% 60%

4. Develop USC for a sustainable future

4.1 Employment costs Less than 60% Less than 60% Less than 60% Less than 60% Less than 60%
4.2 Operating Margin 4% 4% 4% 4% 4%
4.3 Capital Improvements 8.5% 8.5% 8.5% 8.5% 8.5%

STRATEGIC PRIORITY ONE - REVIEW - Enable access to the USC experience

Key strategies: Recruit and support a diverse student population | Provide a high quality student experience | Develop a vibrant and healthy University community and identity | Engage with the regional community through educational, cultural, creative, economic and recreational activities | Extend learning opportunities throughout the region

2011 saw growth in…
Students

An intake of 3,173 new students pushed the University’s student population to 7,766 (including 805 international students) by Semester 1 census. The intake was a three percent increase on Semester 1,2010. This meant an overall increase of seven percent in student numbers, despite a tightening of OP requirements. The mid-year intake of 1,497 students was strong (a 3.4 percent increase on Semester 2,2010).

With the student growth experienced this year, and the QTAC application figures for 2012, it is expected the University will meet its target of 12,000 students (8,000 EFTSL) by 2015. As at 11 December, the total number of QTAC preferences for study at USC in 2012 had increased by two percent over the previous year, compared to a Queensland institutional average of 0.8 percent growth.

Programs

The Bachelor of Nursing Science was again the most popular program at USC, with almost 200 new students enrolled at Semester 1 Census. Enrolments in the program accounted for almost eight percent of the total student body. The Bachelor of Primary Education was also one of the University’s most popular programs, with 108 students commencing the program in Semester 1.

Top 10 undergraduate programs (based on all enrolments) in 2011 were:

  1. Bachelor of Nursing Science
  2. Bachelor of Social Science (Psychology)
  3. Bachelor of Primary Education
  4. Bachelor of Sport and Exercise Science
  5. Bachelor of Paramedic Science
  6. Bachelor of Arts
  7. Bachelor of Biomedical Science
  8. Bachelor of Business
  9. Bachelor of Business (Tourism, Leisure and Event Management)
  10. Bachelor of Occupational Therapy
Campus

The University’s continued priority throughout the year was planning how to manage future student growth through the provision of campus infrastructure and buildings. There were major achievements in this area in 2011, with construction of a number of projects commenced and completed. Refer to page 18 for details.

Reputation

Awareness and reputation of USC continued to grow during 2011. The University produced a new television commercial expanding on the ‘best of both worlds’ tagline, which featured hundreds of USC students in a rally of support for city students who don’t have it as good. Market research conducted in December showed the campaign had a positive impact on parents and school leavers. Among school leavers, awareness of the campaign remained very strong—85 percent, while among parents, unprompted awareness of the campaign increased by 22 percent on 2009 figures.

Reach

Extending USC’s reach in its catchment regions was a priority in 2011. Attendance at recruitment events was strong—Open Day crowds were 14 percent up on 2010, with around 4,600 attendees.

The Sunshine Coast University Showcase, which involves all Queensland universities visiting high schools in the region and is organised by USC, took in 22 schools and reached 3,100 Grade 12 students. Student Life and Learning continued its successful community education courses off-campus in a number of locations across the Coast, providing six-week study skills sessions for adults considering returning to formal education.

In late December, the Federal Government announced grant allocations for the Higher Education Participation and Partnerships Program. The Queensland Consortium (led by Queensland University of Technology), of which USC is a member, received $5.35 million for Indigenous engagement, and $15.8 million for schools outreach. More details, including the release of a second round of funds worth $52 million, are expected early in 2012.

For the third consecutive year, USC stood out as the only public university in Queensland to gain five stars for teaching quality in the 2012 Good Universities Guide. USC was also awarded five stars for its graduates’ satisfaction with the generic skills they gained while at university, and for Indigenous participation. USC scored four stars for access by equity groups, gender balance, and for graduates’ satisfaction with their overall university experience.

National award for raising region’s aspirations

In 2011 USC was rewarded with its first Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) National Program Award, valued at $25,000, for its project entitled Regional Access, Inclusion and Success in Education (RAISE). USC was one of only10 universities across Australia to receive ALTC Awards for Programs that Enhance Learning for 2011. Its success was in the category for ‘educational partnerships and collaborations with other organisations’.

USC’s application highlighted five of its outreach initiatives: its Headstart program for high school students; an alternative entry program called Tertiary Preparation Pathway; its provision of a Primary Industry Centre for Science Education (PICSE USC); a Creative Writing Excellence program in schools; and an Integrated Learning Engineering program in schools.

2011 saw engagement with…
Business and industry

Clean Futures Conference: the Innovation Centre’s second annual one-day conference to support the growth of business in the clean technology sector attracted a total of 120 delegates. The conference, themed ‘Doing business in a carbon-constrained world’, was sponsored by Sunshine Coast Council.

Community

Sunshine Coast World Environment Day Festival: the annual festival was attended by thousands of people, fostering environmental awareness and an understanding of local, regional and global imperatives in sustainability. The festival was organised by USC, the Sunshine Coast Environment Council and Sunshine Coast Council.

Youth

Voices on the Coast Festival: the week-long event began with a youth literature festival at USC, bringing2,200 children aged 10 to 17 onto campus to meet and learn from top international and Australian authors, illustrators and poets. The festival is a long-term partnership between Immanuel Lutheran College and USC.

Schools

More than 120 Year 11 and 12 students from the Sunshine Coast region participated in the Headstart program in 2011. Headstart gives senior school students the opportunity to study at university and get ahead on their degree studies before completing school. In other school activities, more than 700 Year 9 and 10 students from 14 Sunshine Coast and Gympie schools attended Experience USC Day to explore career opportunities. With a choice of 31 workshops, the day was designed to give students an insightinto industries, jobs and how they can achieve their goals.

Almost 300 Year 10 business students attended USC’s Business Enterprise Day to hear the real world stories from a variety of Sunshine Coast business people.

ILE (Integrated Learning Engineering) continued its operation, taking engineering courses toschool classrooms across the region, for 37 enrolled students.

AIME (Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience) Sunshine Coast started at USC in 2011, with more than 60 USC students providing one-on- one mentoring for Indigenous Year 9 and 10 students between Sunshine Beach and Beerwah.

Future students

Recruitment efforts in 2011 included 182 visits to 95 schools, seven regional markets, three university roadshows and an information day for guidance officers and career advisers. Nine information events held on campus and in Gympie and North Brisbane saw student ambassadors and staff talking to an estimated6,200 people about their study options at USC.

National and local identities received honorary awards at the 2011 Graduation ceremonies: Honorary Doctorates of the University were awarded to Dr Karen Woolley, Mary Midgley, Stephen Hamar Midgley AM, and His Excellency, Barnabas Suebu, Governor of the Province of Papua, Indonesia. Former Vice- Chancellor, Professor Paul Thomas AM, received the University’s first Emeritus Professor award, while Honorary Senior Fellowships of the University were awarded to Beverley Hinz, Otto Klaus, John Shadforth, Jocelyn Walker, Jill Chamberlain OAM, Bill Dethlefs, Beverly Hand and Valerie Zwart OAM.

2011 saw support for…
Sustainability

Ride to Work Day: held for the second time at USC, more than 100 people took part riding, walking, catching public transport or carpooling to work to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase healthy activity. Sunshine Coast Council supported the event again in 2011. While the uptake of public transport and environmentally friendly campus travel improved during the year, construction of additional car parking on campus commenced in 2011 to provide an extra 260 spaces.

Reconciliation

Indigenous Education Symposium: organisedby USC’s Buranga Centre, the fifth annual event involved industry, professional and community members, with guest speakers addressing a range of topics designed to facilitate understanding between Indigenous Australians and the broader community. As part of the symposium, a naming and smoking ceremony was held for USC’scollection of Central and Western Desert paintings.

Equality

International Women’s Day: celebrated on campus, a breakfast was held for more than 100 staff and students. The inaugural Greatest Female Athlete (GFA) event was held the following day. Organised by USC Sport, GFA was won by Emma McKenzie, a paramedic science student. Coinciding also with International Women’s Day was the announcement that USC was once again (for the seventh consecutive year) an employer of choice for women—one of 12 Queensland organisationsto receive the EOWA tick.

Art and culture

University Art Gallery: the gallery attracted an impressive number of visitors for the year—11,508 people. Exhibitions featured works by contemporary Australian artists, USC students and travelling artistic showcases.

Sport

Sunshine Coast Sports Hall of Fame: former Australian pace bowler Ashley Noffke and world champion bodyboarder Kira Llewellyn were inducted into the hall of fame for 2011, with a certificate of merit awarded to long-time Sunshine Coast netball administrator Lin Corbett. Located at USC’s Health and Sport Centre, the hall of fame has recognised local high-achieving sports people since 1991.

2011 saw students benefit from…

Increased financial support:

  • More than 800 undergraduate students at USC received financial support from scholarships, bursaries and prizes worth more than $1.48 million. Approximately 500 students received support valued at around $1.2 million in 2010.
  • 67 talented first-year students received scholarships ranging in value from $3,500 to $12,000 (and totalling almost $450,000) at the Undergraduate Scholarships Presentation Ceremony in February.
  • New $4,000 USC Study Support Bursaries assisted 25 students in financial need to balance their studies and part-time work. These new bursaries were the result of a significant private donation. More than 380 applications were received for the 25 new bursaries and another 200
  • USC Equity Bursaries. The $1,000 Equity Bursaries are funded by the Commonwealth’s Higher Education Participation and Partnership Program to a total of $200,000.
  • Representatives of 43 local and national companies presented 67 academic prizes, scholarships and bursaries worth around $70,000 at the annual Faculty of Business Awards and Prizes ceremony (compared to prizes worth around$35,000 in 2010).
  • Support for civil engineering grew with the addition of a Women in Engineering prize. This program, first offered in 2010, has already attracted more than $20,000 in annual scholarships.

Kiteboarder Andy Yates was crowned USC’s 2011 Sportsperson of the Year. Yates was the first Australian to win the Professional Kiteboard Riders Association world title in 2010. The Bachelor of Science student’s achievements in the international arena also earned him the Sunshine Coast Senior Sports Star of the Year title in January. Yates was one of three students to gain Full Blue awards at the USC Sports Awards Ceremony.

Enhanced campus facilities and activities:

  • A range of new campus facilities for teaching, sport and research were developed.
  • The University prepared for the introduction of the Federal Government’s Student Services and Amenities Fee in 2012 (refer also to student representation below). Monies raised from the fee will directly benefit students by improving student access to a range of campus services, such as sporting and recreational activities, employment and career advice, financial advice, food services, counselling services, legal services, health services and housing services.
  • USC expanded its social media presence for students on Facebook, Flickr and Twitter (in addition to its existing channel on YouTube). Social media is now being used by a variety of departments/initiatives, including USC International, UniSafe, the GO Program and student ambassadors.
  • A team of 80 students travelled to the Gold Coast to compete in the Australian University Games in September (a much larger contingent than the two teams that travelled to Perth in 2010). Three silver medals in the 4x100m relay, mixed touch football and volleyball meant USC finished sixth overall from 39 universities competing at the annual multi-sport carnival.
  • USC Sport hosted two fun events to celebrate the last day of semester. The USC Sport Fun Run offered students a 3km or 6km challenge, while the more relaxed option was the Plunge at the USC Pool, with a free swim, music and barbeque.
  • The Access and Wellbeing Expo (incorporating Ride to Work Day) raised awareness of disability, wellbeing and mental health issues through a series of fun activities and informative workshops.
  • The USC Rugby Club opened its sports bar and screened sporting events to staff and students for the first time, while an inaugural masquerade ball was organised by students.

Greater student representation and consultation:

  • The position of Student Ombudsman was created in 2011. During the year, five formal grievances were investigated by the ombudsman after referral by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor. Confidential advice also was provided to a number of students.
  • Students were invited to comment on the types of services and facilities that will be funded through the Student Services and Amenities Fee (SSAF) in 2012. Submissions were received from the Student Guild, USC Golden Key, and members of the Vice Chancellor’s Student Liaison Committee. A student focus group was held and all students were sent a survey inviting them to identify priorities for SSAF expenditure. The results of these consultations will be published on the University website in early 2012.
  • The USC Student Guild increased its presence on campus in 2011, with the election of a new executive and a membership drive. Funds from the Student Services and Amenities Fee will provide additional financial assistance to the guild in 2012.
  • USC participated in the pilot University Experience Survey of undergraduate students.It is anticipated this survey will be administered nationally from 2012, and form one of the measures for Commonwealth performance funding.
  • To support and retain new and continuing students, Student Administration conducted the ‘Ask Us Anything Day’ event, held early in Semesters 1 and 2. The event, a part of USC’s Student Retention Action Plan (2011-2013), aims to enable students to get advice and information on their study in one place at one time; promote the support and advice available to students; and resolve any challenges students may be facing, in order to reduce the likelihood they may withdraw from university study.

Extended practical learning opportunities:

  • A record number of students had access to workplace learning opportunities in 2011, with 1,494 taking placements with businesses and community organisations (compared to 1,345in 2010). The Work Integrated Learning program provides students with valuable work experience as part of most degrees, to prepare them for their chosen careers.
  • More than 800 students explored opportunities for practical industry experience and employment at the annual USC Careers Fair in March. Representatives from around 30 local, national and government organisations attended.
  • USC had success with the Health Workforce Australia (HWA) fund, where a total of $3.4 million was allocated to the University to support practicum placements in nursing and allied health. Six professions served by USC degrees are targeted: Midwifery, Occupational Therapy, Psychology (Clinical), Nursing, Paramedic Science and Medical Laboratory Science.
  • The GO (Global Opportunities) Program, where USC students study overseas as part of their degree, was expanded in 2011 to include work placement opportunities.

More travel and transport options:

  • Completion of the $55,000 Bike Hub provided secure bike storage on campus during work/study hours, as well as personal lockers, showers and toilet facilities.
  • A free express bus service between Noosa and the Sippy Downs campus for USC students and staff was trialled in July. It is likely to be expanded to service other Sunshine Coast areas in 2012.
  • A trial of U-Pass provided up to 2,000 students with subsidised public transport by bus. U-Pass is a nation-first venture, involving USC, Sunshine Coast Council and Translink.
Forward planning for 2012
  • Investigate and implement a scholarship application and assessment database to improve equitable distribution of funds by November 2012.
  • Develop and deliver a Customer Service Model for Student Administration to enhance the student experience throughout the student lifecycle by September 2012.
  • Improve the experience and transition of international students through collaborative activities with the International Students Association.
  • Develop, implement and review the Strategic Asset Management Plan (SAMP) to plan, manage and deliver all facilities to support the student population.
  • Increase online services to include mobile-optimised content, social media, searchable student FAQs, online forms, electronic payment and print-friendly web pages.

STRATEGIC PRIORITY ONE - PERFORMANCE - Enable access to the USC experience

KPI 1.1: 12,000 students by 2015
Measure Target Peformance
Actual full year student enrolments 12,000 (8,000 EFTSL) by 2015 6.5% increase in 2011

Comment: Targets have been set annually for all fee types from 2012 to position the University for its target of 8,000 EFTSL by 2015. These will be rolling targets and progress will be assessed following each official reforecast (April and September each year). The increase in load in 2011 following the September reforecast, due to increased mid-year intakes and improved retention rates from Semester 1 to Semester 2, has lessened the requirement for major increases in intakes through to 2015. This is reflected in the targets set for 2012 and beyond.

University EFTSL by fee type, 2008 to 2015 (Estimates and targets based on Census 1 and 2, 2011 data)

Fee type 2008 (actual) 2009 (actual) 2010 (actual) 2011 (actual) 2012 (target) 2013 (target) 2014 (target) 2015 (target)
CGS EFTSL 1 3631.6 4313.3 4994.4 5467.5 5945.9 6363.1 6733.2 7048.0
International EFTSL 2 713.0 767.1 777.0 714.1 701.2 685.6 677.7 678.2
Fee Paying Domestic EFTSL 3 220.4 227.8 231.9 207.6 208.6 212.9 224.2 236.1
Inbound Exchange EFTSL 32.3 24.5 30.9 40.3 39.4 39.4 39.4 39.4
Grand Total EFTSL 4597.3 5332.7 6034.3 6429.5 6895.0 7301.0 7674.4 8001.7
% increase 11.3% 16.0% 13.2% 6.5% 7.2% 5.9% 5.1% 4.3%
KPI 1.2: SES Participation
Measure Target Peformance
Participation rate of students from low socio-economic backgrounds 20% participation rate of students from low socio- economic backgrounds by 2015
Achieve Compact agreement targets
2011: 18.1%, 2012: 18.5%, 2013: 19.1%, 2014: 19.7%
2011 data not available from DEEWR (release date to be advised)*

Comment: In 2009 DEEWR introduced a new measure to assess the socio-economic status of students. Previously a student’s socio-economic status was assessed based on the postcode of their permanent home address. The new measure is based on the census collection district (CCD) of the student’s permanent home address. This is a more refined assessment for measuring the socio-economic status of a community and allows for more variation within a region. This data is combined with data on the number of students who receive selected Centrelink Student Income Support payments to form the ‘interim measure’ for socio-economic status. This performance measure (KPI 1.2), together with the performance measure in the Compact Agreement with DEEWR, will be assessed using the ‘interim measure’. In 2010, USC’s participation rate for students from low socio-economic backgrounds was 18%, above the national rate of 14.29%. DEEWR have not yet published the 2011 data for this performance measure.

Participation rates (%) for low SES students

Participation rates % 4 USC 2009 (%) National 2009 (%) USC 2010 (%) National 2010 (%) USC 2011 (%) National 2011 (%)
Low SES (Interim measure) 5 17.85 14.13 18.00 14.29 n/a n/a
Low SES (CCD measure) 17.43 14.40 18.17 14.64 n/a n/a

1. Includes Enabling, TPP, Undergraduate and Postgraduate CGS EFTSL.
2. Includes international on campus, online and remaining off campus transnational (TNE) EFTSL following the University’s phased withdrawal from these programs.
3. Includes Postgraduate, HDR, Headstart and Visiting domestic fee paying EFTSL.
4. Domestic students with permanent home residence in Australia only.
5. The DEEWR interim measure of the Low SES Participation rate is based on the number of domestic undergraduate students with home addresses within the Low SES Census Collection Districts (CCD)and the number of students who are receiving selected Centrelink Student Income Support payments.

n/a = Data not yet available.

* Updated figures will be made available at www.usc.edu.au/reports.

STRATEGIC PRIORITY TWO - REVIEW - Deliver high quality teaching, learning and graduate outcomes

Key strategies: Embed academic excellence in all teaching and learning activities | Support diverse learning and teaching styles to maximise student participation and success | Offer innovative programs, in particular via partnerships | Produce graduates with knowledge, skills and attributes to succeed in a world characterised by rapid change

For the third consecutive year, USC was recognised at a national level for its quality of learning and teaching.

  • USC was the only public university in Queensland to earn five stars for teaching quality in the 2012 Good Universities Guide.
  • USC won five Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) citations forits outstanding academics and student experience programs, and also gained its first ALTC National Program award.
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
  • School of Communication
  • School of Social Sciences

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Dean, Professor Pam Dyer, announced her retirement in late 2010. Professor Joanne Scott, previously Head, School of Social Sciences at USC, was appointed Executive Dean of the restructured Faculty of Arts and Business, to commence in January 2012.

Undergraduate students 1,925
Postgraduate students 110
Research students 38
Male:female students 30%:70%
Award programs 57

Achievements in 2011:

  • Dr Christine Morley received an ALTC citation for academic excellence, recognising her dedication to student learning in social work.
  • Journalism student Jodie Stephens won the‘Most Outstanding Journalism Student—Regional Campus’ at the 2011 Queensland Clarion Awards. Fellow USC student Lynette Brown was runner-up in the same category.
  • Three public relations students managed the 2011Multicultural Excellence Awards, in conjunction with the Sunshine Coast Community Cooperative.
  • Artwork by design student Carla McRae, inspired by the Japanese nuclear disaster, featured in the July issue of The Walkley Magazine, alongside articles by correspondents workingin Japan.
  • Three social work and counselling studentstook up positions with the Gympie Child Safety Service Centre, having been offered jobs with the department within months of completing their final exams.
  • One new program was approved for offer in 2012: Master of Urban and Regional Planning (2 years).
Faculty of Business

It was announced in 2011 that the Faculty of Business will become a school within the newly formed Faculty of Arts and Business as of January 1, 2012.

Undergraduate students 1,288
Postgraduate students 139
Research students 18
Male:female students 49%:51%
Award programs 42

Achievements in 2011:

  • Dr Peter Baxter received an ALTC citation for academic excellence, recognising his dedication to student learning in business.
  • Bachelor of Arts / Business graduate, Chris Raine, was named as Queensland’s Young Australian of the Year for 2012 for developing an anti-binge drinking program to help change the drinking habits of young people.
  • Representatives of 43 local and national companies presented almost 70 academic prizes, scholarships and bursaries totaling more than $70,000 at the annual Faculty of Business Awards and Prizes Ceremony.
  • Three international business students finished third in a global online competition, beating 900 students from 280 universities world-wide towin a place in the 2011 Fall Capstone BusinessSimulation Challenge.
  • Bachelor of Property Economics and Development student Jude Mannix had her research project exploring the use of technology in estimating the value of residential houses published in Australia and New Zealand Property Journal.
  • The Bachelor of Property Economics and Development received five new certifications from the Australian Property Institute, one of only two accredited programs in Queensland to receive the industry recognition.
  • One new program was approved for offer in 2012: Bachelor of Commerce (Honours).
Faculty of Science, Health and Education
  • School of Health and Sport Sciences
  • School of Science and Education

Faculty of Science, Health and Education Dean, Professor Rod Simpson, announced his retirement in late 2010. Professor John Bartlett, previously Dean (Elect), School of Science, University of Western Sydney, was appointed Executive Dean of the restructured Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, to commence in January 2012.

Undergraduate students 2,930
Postgraduate students 431
Research students 85
Male:female students 31%:69%
Award programs 72

Achievements in 2011:

  • Dr Fiona Pelly and lecturer Kylie Readman received ALTC citations for academic excellence, in recognition of their dedication to studentlearning in nutrition and dietetics, and education, respectively. Tertiary Preparation Pathway course coordinator Emma Kill received an ALTC citation for her work in preparing young mothers for tertiary study.
  • Education student Emily Verrall joined with two Sunshine Coast teachers in attending NASA’s Space Camp in Alabama, gaining skills in explaining the science involved in rocketry and flight, astronaut and shuttle simulations and DNA experimentation.
  • The first cohort of occupational therapy students completed their studies. Seventeen students were recognised at an awards ceremony attended by industry professionals.
  • Two nutrition and dietetics graduates worked on a collaborative community nutrition project, providing a key contribution towards the project winning $750,000 in the Healthy Queensland Awards. The Better Informed Takeaways and Eateries (BITE) program is an awards scheme that encourages food outlets to use healthier cooking techniques and promote healthier menu options.
  • Seven new programs were approved for offer in 2012: Associate Degree in Medical Laboratory Science, Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering, Bachelor of Nursing Science/ Bachelor of Midwifery, Graduate Certificate in Education, Graduate Diploma in Education (Preparatory to Year 3), Graduate Diploma in Education (Primary) and Graduate Diploma in Education (Secondary).
Learning by doing
  • An integral part of the University’s approach to learning and teaching is work integrated learning—providing as much practical experience as possible to prepare students for success in their chosen career. A record number of students (1,494, 149 more than in 2010) took on placement opportunities as part of the Work Integrated Learning (WIL) program in 2011, and some of the year’s highlights are:
  • Matthew Bousson completed six months of his Bachelor of Sport and Exercise Science degree as a sports performance intern, working with the gridiron team at Stanford University. He was the first USC student to undertake such an internship at Stanford.
  • Study Abroad student, Holly Burkhardt, from Baltimore, Maryland, worked alongside veterinary technicians at UnderWater World, helping to rehabilitate injured and ill sea turtles.
  • Four Bachelor of Business (Tourism, Leisure and Event Management) students travelled to Lady Elliot Island off Bundaberg to spend four days researching marine flora and fauna. The students launched a pilot program involving USC, Tourism Queensland and Reef Check Australia, promoting community education and conservation of reef resources.
  • Paramedic Science student, Bec Lostroh, experienced the aftermath of Cyclone Yasi first-hand, while completing a 12-month paid internship based at the Edmonton ambulance station south of Cairns.
  • Seven students spent a fortnight at a fledgling eco-resort in Fiji, learning about eco-tourism and helping to establish a dolphin and marine education centre in the village of Nataleira.
  • Nursing science student, Christine Pointon (pictured right), completed a two-week placement with the Royal Flying Doctor Service based in Bundaberg and servicing the Queensland outback.
  • Krystina Lamb, a science honours student, completed a five-day course through the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering, working on experiments in neutrons, ions, gamma irradiation, natural radioactivity in environmental studies and nuclear techniques for groundwater studies.
  • Three tourism, leisure and event management students helped promote Buderim’s 150th anniversary celebrations through a social media project, working with the Buderim War Memorial Community Association.
  • Dozens of education students participated in teaching experiences at isolated schools across Queensland, including Doomadgee, Charleville, Lockhart River and Mornington Island. The students were supported by the Rural and Remote Education Bursary scheme, which awards 43 bursaries of up to $2,500 each to USC’s trainee teachers each year.
  • An agreement was struck between USC and Centacare Catholic Family and Community Services that will enable students from the Master of Counselling Practice and Master of Counselling to participate in 200 hours of supervised client work in Centacare’s family therapy service.
Students in other programs

Cross-institutional enrolments 18
International Inbound Exchange 31
Integrated Learning Engineering 37
Study Abroad 212
Tertiary Preparation Pathway 421
Visiting (Headstart / Non Award) 84

Figures as at Census 1.

The learning journey

Learning and teaching week USC held its second Learning and Teaching Week in 2011. The five-day event was themed ‘The Learning Journey’ and explored both what happens to students before, during and after their time at university, and the potential impacts of the then-planned deregulation of student enrolments in 2012. Four keynote speakers made presentations on topics including learning styles, teaching quality, assessment and the impact of enrolment deregulation.

Academic support

Enrolments in the Tertiary Preparation Pathway (TPP) increased further in 2011, surpassing the significant intakes in 2009 and 2010. More than 1,000 students enrolled at USC using the pathway (compared to 867 in 2010). TPP classes were also taught at Caboolture, Gympie, Noosa and Nambour. The Tertiary Enabling Program (TEP) continued to deliver academic support to students needing to brush up on study skills in areas such as mathematics, physics and biology. Around 430 students enrolled in TEP in 2011. Around 630 commencing students were matched with 108 student mentors during Orientation in Semesters 1 and 2. The value of mentoring is in the networking, insights on how to survive the first few weeks, and making new students feel welcome.

Environmental science graduate Katie Roberts, 27, and education graduate Robert Gibbs, 47 and creative writing graduate William Douglas, 49, and nutrition graduate Fiona Finnegan, 20, received the highest award available to graduating students at graduation ceremonies in 2011. The Chancellor’s Medal recognises excellence in academic performance, University governance, community service and student welfare.

Internationalisation
International student profile

International students 805
Undergraduate and postgraduate coursework 532
Higher degree by research 23
Study Abroad 212
Exchange 31
Other pathways 7

Figures as at Census 1.

International enrolments declined in 2011, reflecting the strong Australian dollar and a tightening of USC’s entry requirements in some programs. Numbers from Germany and the USA declined noticeably, however enrolments from Scandinavian countries grew. The Faculty of Business accounted for almost half of international student enrolments.

The top source countries in 2011 were

  1. USA
  2. Germany
  3. Canada
  4. France
  5. Norway

The International Student Barometer showed that in 2011, very strong student satisfaction was evident in three of the four broad experience categories, arrival, living and support. USC had the highest rate of student satisfaction for both arrival and living experience among all Australian institutions.

Funding for international expansion
  • USC was awarded two of seven $5,000 languages scholarships from Queensland Education and Training International (QETI). The government funding will support two students’ language studies from 2012. The scholarships were in addition to QETI grants worth $109,000 for USC in 2011, including funding to bring high-performing students from countries such as India to study on campus.
  • USC received funding from the Federal Government for initiatives that will see staff and students travel to the USA, Ecuador, Indonesia and Cambodia as of 2012. A study tour of advertising students will visit New York to engage with some of the most prestigious advertising agencies in the USA. The Sustainability Research Centre will take students to Cambodia to work with the Cambodian Ministry of Tourism to inventory tourism attractions. Language students will stayin Indonesia for three-to-six weeks for in-country language studies. USC International will coordinate and oversee four projects to Ecuador, ranging from one-to-four months in duration, including projects in the Amazon Rainforest, the Andes mountains and in Quito.
  • USC was the recipient of two of the eight prestigious US Fulbright Senior Specialist Awards to be hosted in Australia in 2012. The awards support Australian educational institutions to bring US senior specialists to Australia for two to six week periods. Dr Loren Kellogg, Lematta Professor of Forest Engineering in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University and Professor Steven Walsh, Professor of Geography and Director, UNC Center for Galapagos Studies in Ecuador, will travel to USC to explore post-secondary teaching in forest engineering and the impact of climate change on tourism, respectively.
GO Program

Around 80 students studied in 17 countries in 2011, as part of USC’s Global Opportunities (GO) Program. The most popular countries were the USA, Germany and Japan. USC sent students to four new partner institutions—Pontificia Universidade Catolica (PUC) in Brazil, Stockholm University Department of Education in Sweden, Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences in The Netherlands, and Soongsil University in Seoul, South Korea.

The GO Program, which traditionally focuses on students studying a semester or two at overseas partner universities, was expanded in 2011 to include work placement opportunities (WPL). In 2011, four students undertook work placements in Kruger National Park in South Africa. In 2012, students will have the opportunity to undertake work placements in South Africa, Ecuador and the USA, working in areas such as environmental science, primate research, climate change and tourism.

Alumni

The University welcomed more than 1,400 new graduates into its alumni cohort in 2011, with two ceremonies in April and another in September. Graduates were welcomed back to campus with a10-year alumni reunion for the Class of 2001, and at a ceremony in September, three high-achieving graduates received the 2011 Outstanding Alumni of the Year Awards:

  • Chris Raine BA/BBus 2009 (Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences), for his work to encourage young people to develop a healthier relationship with alcohol (this has also lead to his award of Queensland Young Australian of the Year for 2012)
  • Dave Gilbert BBus(IntBus) 2006 (Faculty of Business), for his work as a mining consultant in Western Australia
  • Nubia Ramos BSc (BiomedSc) 2007, BSc(Hons) 2008, PhD 2011 (Faculty of Science, Health and Education), for her work as a research scientist at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden
Forward planning for 2012:
  • Design and deliver capstone or work integrated learning course experiences and authentic or life-like assessment opportunities, aligned with the learning outcomes of the course and program.
  • Ensure expectations in PPR, PDP and Academic Promotion align with the strategic plan priorities.
  • Deliver scheduled program reviews as a key component of academic quality assurance.
  • Provide opportunities for professional development and enriched research experiences via visits and joint and/or cross institutional enrolments among the HDR cohort.
  • Develop and deliver systemic academic success and development programs, as a partnership between Student Life and Learning and the faculties.

STRATEGIC PRIORITY TWO - PERFORMANCE - Deliver high quality teaching, learning and graduate outcomes

KPI 2.1: Student Satisfaction
Measure Target Performance
Annual national comparative assessment in the CEQ Overall Satisfaction Index Achieve national ranking in the top quartile for the CEQ Overall Satisfaction Index each year 2011 data not available from GCA until April 2012 *

Comment: The Australian Graduate Survey (AGS) captures a measure of graduate satisfaction through responses to the Overall Satisfaction Index (OSI). The OSI is a mandatory single item scale included in the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) component of the AGS by all institutions. It seeks response to the statement ‘Overall, I was satisfied with the quality of this program’.

The University reports on the performance for this scale as the percent of all respondents that ‘agree’ with the survey item (ie Agree or Strongly Agree).The results in the table below detail the level of overall satisfaction reported by USC undergraduates in comparison to the national aggregated level of undergraduate overall satisfaction. The University has performed strongly in the Overall Satisfaction Index from 2008 to 2010, being above the national average in each of these years. Data collected on the 2010 AGS indicates a sharp spike in graduate satisfaction across the three core scales.

At the national level a similar increase is also evident. A change to the response category labelling on the 2010 AGS is believed to have impacted positively on graduate responses to CEQ items. Prior to the 2010 AGS only the end points of the five-point Likert scale were labelled (strongly disagree and strongly agree). In the 2010AGS, labelling of all response categories was introduced, as advised by the AGS coordinating body Graduate Careers Australia (GCA), to mitigate instances of graduates mistakenly reversing their CEQ responses.

GCA advised that ‘the change to the instrument has seen a positive upward shift in CEQ responses and brings about with it the establishment of a new CEQ time series.’ GCA further commented that ‘the sector should note that this is across the board and not restricted to individual institutions.’

Cautionary note regarding interpretation of this data: these results represent the combination of results across a broad range of fields of education (FoE). Therefore the FoE specific results should be considered when interpreting these results and identifying trends in the data.

Course Experience Questionnaire Overall Satisfaction Index, annual ranking of Percentage Agreement, 6,7 relative to the national 8 ranking

  2008 (%) 2008 (Rank) 2009 (%) 2009 (Rank) 2010 (%) 2010 (Rank) 2011 (%) 2011 (Rank)
University of the Sunshine Coast 74% 11 71% 13 86% 5 n/a n/a
National 60%   69%   81%   Not available Not available
Number of institutions   38   38   38 Not available Not available
KPI 2.2: Graduate Outcomes
Measure Target Performance
Annual national comparative assessment of graduate employment and graduates undertaking further study Achievement of the national average for bachelor degree graduates in employment or further study by 2015 2011 data not available from GCA until April 2012 *

Comment: The graduate outcomes measure represents a combination of the number of graduates in their preferred mode of employment plus the number of graduates in further full-time study, as reported through responses to the Australian Graduate Survey. Results are reported for domestic undergraduates only.

The proportion of USC respondents in their preferred mode of employment or further full-time study over the period 2005 to 2010 has been lower than the comparable national figure. Results have fluctuated over these years, however 2010 saw the smallest differential over this six year period. This result indicates a positive trend in relation to the progressive target that has been set for this measure.

USC and national 10 Graduate Outcome results

  2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
University of the Sunshine Coast 79% 76% 82% 75% 77% n/a
National 87% 89% 89% 85% 83% n/a
Differential 9% 13% 7% 9% 6% n/a

6. Combination of percentage of responses that Agree or Strongly Agree with the Overall Satisfaction Index: ‘Overall, I was satisfied with the quality of this program’.
7. Undergraduate level students only.
8. Table A providers only.
9. Data reflects responses by students who completed their qualification in the year prior to the AGS survey year, ie data for the 2010 AGS reflects responses by students who completed their qualifications in 2009.
10. National value includes results for all higher education providers and is not restricted to Table A institutions.
11. Data reflects outcomes of students who completed their qualification in the year prior to the AGS survey year, ie data for the 2010 AGS reflect the outcome of a student who completed their qualification in 2009.

n/a = Data not yet available.

* Updated figures will be made available at www.usc.edu.au/reports.

STRATEGIC PRIORITY THREE - REVIEW - Build research productivity and output significantly

Key strategies: Strengthen research capability | Develop research groups in disciplinary and cross-disciplinary areas | Focus research on regionally relevant and strategic areas | Leverage research outputs to enable productive partnerships

The total number of Higher Degree byResearch enrolments for 2011 was 113 EFTSL, a small increase on 2010 and just under the target of 120 EFTSL. Recent grant success, combined with the strategic imperative to increase USC’s investment in scholarships, will see an increase in total higher degree by research enrolments in support of successful research programs.

ARC success

Raising the research profile of USC is a key priority in the new Strategic Plan. A key component of this strategy is success with the Australian Research Council (ARC). The most prestigious ARC grants are in the Discovery category and USC received two, worth more than $1 million, in the 2012 funding round announced in November 2011:

  • Dr Scott Cummins was awarded a $656,377 ARC Future Fellowship for his study of primordial germ cell migration in perciform fish (the largest order of fish, including the most important food and game fishes), titled: ‘Decoding the rules of fate, attraction and cell migration in perciform fish’. The ARC grant will be coupled with Dr Cummins’ ARC Discovery Project Grant of $145,000 FOR2012 for research into snail hypometabolism, enabling him to build a significant team of researchers conducting world-class research in the field of biological sciences.
  • Professor Roland De Marco, Pro Vice-Chancellor for Research and joint chief investigator in a project called ‘New mesoporous materials for use in high temperature proton exchange fuel cell membranes’, gained a three-year ARC Discovery Project grant of $420,000, with $40,000 each year to support a PhD student at USC. The research involves using cutting-edge synchrotron radiation techniques to develop innovative fuel cell materials with the potential to provide high energy and high stability alcohol fuel cells.

In other ARC achievements:

  • Dr Kate Mounsey won a $375,000 competitive grant for research into the contagious skin infection, scabies, titled: ‘A porcine model to provide new insights on scabies immunopathology’. Her study was one of 277 projects selected from2,159 applications nationally for funding under the ARC’s new Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA) scheme. The ARC grant will be coupled with Dr Mounsey’s award of a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Project grant of $483,510 (in collaboration with USC’s Associate Professor Shelley Walton) on a related project over the same timeframe.
  • USC was also announced as a partner in three successful ARC Linkage Infrastructure Equipment and Facilities grants worth more than $1 million, involving Dr Cummins (via the University of Queensland), Professor De Marco (via Curtin University) and Senior Lecturer in Environmental Microbiology, Dr Ipek Kurtboke (via the University of Queensland). These successes will see high-end research tools coming to USC as well as access to sophisticated labs at partner institutions.
Smart Futures success
  • New staff member, Dr Joanne Macdonald, commences at USC in early 2012 with a Smart Futures Fellowship worth $360,000 awarded in late 2011, for a project titled ‘Molecular Engineering for advancing viral diagnostics’. This grant supports her work in building virus detectors that use molecules to detect and distinguish between multiple viruses in a disposable dip-stick format. The chosen target viruses for detection include Hendra and Australian Bat Lyssavirus, which have impacted both Queensland health and the economy. A rapid, automatic and field-implementable diagnostic test to detect and differentiate these viruses could speed critical decisions to protect livestock and native animals, and improve patient treatment decisions.
  • A Smart Futures PhD Scholarship was also awarded to USC student Karina Hamilton for her work on native stingless bees.
Establishing a Collaborative Research Network

Australia’s Chief Scientist, Professor Ian Chubb, visited USC in September to launch the University’s$5.45 million Collaborative Research Network (CRN) project. The three-year Research Futures Project partners USC with Griffith University,the University of Tasmania and the University of Queensland in undertaking nationally significant research involving water sciences, sustainability, forestry and aquaculture.

It was one of 12 projects nationally to gain funds under the Collaborative Research Networks (CRN) program.USC’s CRN will serve to boost the University’s current research strengths in areas of local, national and international significance. USC will also work with Queensland University of Technology to establish a Centre for Leadership in Research Development to help USC andother smaller universities further develop their research capacity.

The CRN launch coincided with the closing date for applications for 20 USC Research Fellows, linked to the CRN funding, that were advertised nationally and internationally. Approximately 120 applications were received from highly qualified individuals from around the world.

Sustainability research activities
  • USC’s Sustainability Research Centre Director Professor Tim Smith hosted a public forum outlining the relationship between climate change and marine and coastal adaptation. Professor Smith was one of three leading Australian scientists in the fields of climatology, ecology and social science at the forum, The Climate Story– from Impacts to Adaptation, organised by the National Climate Change Adaptation Research Network for Marine Biodiversity and Resources (Marine Adaptation Network).
  • Findings from the 18-month Housing Choice Report research project were presented to industry in August. More than 550 households participated in a research survey, which could lead to the development of an affordable housing model for the region. The Housing Choice Report also suggested housing products to inform the Sunshine Coast Council’s policy development processes.
Genecology research activities
  • A 200-square metre glasshouse owned by the CSIRO was relocated to the University campus in 2011, to provide a facility for research into producing fast-growing native trees to help mitigate climate change. The $500,000 facility, which includes an automated ventilation system, will be used by USC, the CSIRO and the Queensland Department of Employment, EconomicDevelopment and Innovation (DEEDI).
  • Dr Scott Cummins helped discover the reproductive chemical that makes male squid fight, identifying a protein similar to that found in humans. Dr Cummins, a member of the USC Genecology Research Group, worked with a research team on the east coast of North America until he returned to Australia in 2007. The team, led by Roger Hanlon of the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, Massachusetts, studied the Longfin squid. The final collaborative report featured in the February 2011 edition of respected international journal Current Biology.
  • USC PhD graduate, Kelli Anderson, earned a two-year Postdoctoral Research Fellowship at the Universite’ du Havre in Normandy, France. She will investigate the relationship between environmental pollution and marine reproduction in the European sea bass. Ms Anderson’s PhD research was focussed on fish reproductive endocrinology and involved analysing the reproductive physiology of species including salmon, tuna, mullet and oysters.
  • Senior Lecturer in Vegetation and Plant Ecology, Dr Alison Shapcott, provided scientific expertise for a collaborative project protecting a rare and endangered species of macadamia tree in Central Queensland. Over two years she has conducted habitat modelling and established genetic profiles for the only recorded population of Macadamia jansenii trees, located in Bulburin National Park, and in late 2011, participated in the first recovery plantings of trees to create new populations. The project has been coordinated by the Macadamia Conservation Trust in conjunction with the traditional owners of the land where the species is naturally found, the Department of Environment and Resource Management, the Australian Macadamia Society and USC.
  • Scientist Karina Hamilton received a National Health and Medical Research Council postgraduate scholarship worth $75,830, for her work, titled ‘Evaluating the anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and wound-healing properties of Australian native stingless bee cerumen from Trigona carbonaria, and the effects of bee foraging behaviours on cerumen bioactivity’. Her work was also recognised with a Smart Futures PhD Scholarship, worth $36,000.
Health research activities
  • Associate Professor Margaret Barnes led a collaborative project to encourage more new mothers on the Sunshine Coast to breastfeed their babies for six months, before introducing other foods. Professor Barnes’ research project recruited 120 women who gave birth at Nambour General Hospital during the year to participate in the program.
  • Master of Psychology (Clinical) student Linda Finch launched a research project aiming to reduce the burden of mental health issues among older people through the development of strategies to enhance their lifestyles within the community. The project, and an ongoing study by fellow Masters student Kathryn Wilson into anxiety among children aged nine to 12, were selected for presentation at a national therapy conference in Sydney in October.
  • The work of two USC sport scientists featured in Series 3 of Rexona Australia’s Greatest Athlete competition (on Channel 7). Laboratory technicians Stephen Bishop and Raymond Cupples designed a punching challenge for the eight elite athletes who contested the series.
  • Dr Mark McKean, head of USC’s Australian Institute of Fitness Research, presented new findings into the most effective exercise programs for elderly people at a series of workshops across the country. The research, conducted by USC Honours student Tim Stockwell, was supervised by Dr McKean and conducted in conjunction with the Australian Institute of Fitness as a funding research partner.
Gaming research activities
  • Lecturer in Computer-Based Design and Doctor of Creative Arts student, Uwe Terton, developed a simulation game to help children aged 8-12 learn more about Australian fauna and flora. As part of his doctoral research, Mr Terton investigated how effectively simulation games boost the amount of time children physically interact with the natural environment.
  • The winner of USC’s annual Three Minute Thesis competition, PhD student Steven Boyd, represented USC for the first time at the annual Australia and New Zealand Three Minute Thesis Competition. Mr Boyd was one of 42 contestants to present at the University of Western Australia in September. His presentation examined the use of fun games as teaching tools and how computer games could be designed to help boost property investment education.
  • The University offered a PhD scholarship in 2011 to undertake extensive research into the effects of computer games on young people’s mental health. The aim of the study is to determine if computer games are beneficial in improving the minds and well-being of children and adolescents.
Appointment of inaugural Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research)

Professor Roland De Marco commenced as USC’s inaugural Pro Vice-Chancellor for Research in February, bringing with him the goal of boosting the University’s success in research publications and grant income. The Professor of Chemistry was previously the Associate Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research Strategy and Development) at Curtin University in Perth, where he had worked since1995. At Curtin, he helped create a strong research culture that delivered many prestigious Australian Research Council fellowships, a top 500 ranking in the Shanghai Jiao Tong index, and a national ranking just outside the top 10 universities in Australia.

University research conference

The annual University Research Conference, themed around ‘Bridging disciplinary divides: Communicate, Connect, Collaborate’, attracted academics, Higher Degree by Research students and external guests. Almost 30 presentations showcased USC research efforts, including the portrayal of men in music video clips, depression, work-life balance in the legal profession and consumer perceptions of risk in relation to eating seafood. Workshops were also delivered to assist staff in boosting their chances of having papers published, developing research partnerships, and gaining grants. Additional workshops are scheduled for delivery in 2012.

Research in the community

Twelve PhD students from USC featured in a series of interviews with local radio station ABC CoastFM in 2011. The ABC’s afternoon Drive program, chatted with students every Tuesday afternoon from September to the end of November about their PhDs. Students explained why they chose their particular PhD topics, what they had discovered, and what impact they hoped their research would have on society or the world. ABC Coast FM reported that the interviews attracted positive feedback from listeners, while many ofthe students remarked on how much they enjoyed being interviewed. The radio station posted podcasts of many of the interviews on its website.

Forward planning for 2012:
  • Increase the number of publications produced by USC staff and students.
  • Continue work on the Collaborative Research Networks-funded research project.
  • Increase the number of HDR students at USC by offering more scholarships and joint HDR programs with external organisations.
  • Increase research linkages with external organisations.
  • Establish several new USC research centres.
  • Develop and build research capabilities in health to coincide with the opening of the Skills, Academic and Research Centre (SARC) at the Sunshine Coast University Hospital.

STRATEGIC PRIORITY THREE - PERFORMANCE - Build research productivity and output significantly

KPI 3.1: Research Grants Income
Measure Target Performance
Total HERDC reportable income (all categories) $6,000,000 by 2015 (reporting on 2015 data) $2,723,000 (reporting on 2011 data) 12

Comment: Milestone changes and extended contract negotiations impacted on the 2011 target, particularly in the competitive grant income. Adjustments to milestones and contract arrangements will be finalised early in 2012. These changes will be reflected in 2012 reporting.

Total HERDC reportable research income ($) by category by year

Grant income ($) 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 12
Competitive Grants 125,992 611,970 856,985 514,039 1,191,726 315,695
Public Sector Funding 631,959 1,098,865 1,221,736 2,140,483 1,620,848 1,092,594
Industry / Other Funding 265,852 338,724 298,297 408,875 795,270 838,343
CRC 13 n/a n/a n/a n/a 277,675 476,186
Total ($) 1,023,803 2,049,559 2,377,018 3,063,397 3,885,519 2,722,818
Target           3,600,000

12. Figures are not finalised and are unaudited. Updated figures will be made available at www.usc.edu.au/reports.
13. Income received from the Seafood Cooperative Research Centre (Seafood CRC) in which the University of the Sunshine Coast (USC) was defined within the Commonwealth Agreement as a Participant.

n/a = Data not yet available.

KPI 3.2: Weighted Publications
Measure Target Performance
Total HERDC reportable publications (all categories) weighted 250 points by 2015 (reporting on 2015 data) 2011 data not available from DEEWR until July 2012 *

Comment: 2011 publication data is expected mid 2012. The 2011 target is 190 weighted research publication points. The annual weighted publications targets can be viewed in the Target Summary on page 5.

Research publications (weighted) by category and by year

Publications (weighted) 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
Books 7.50 30.00 15.00 5.00  
Chapters 15.59 20.81 16.54 10.14  
Journal Articles 79.24 100.19 107.08 119.38  
Conference Publications 18.62 45.74 38.49 32.63  
Total 120.96 196.74 177.11 167.15 n/a 14
KPI 3.3: Higher Degree by Research
Measure Target Performance
Part A: HDR student enrolments by EFTSL 155 EFTSL by 2015 (Based on 2015 data) 113 in 2011(below annual incremental target of 120)
Part B: HDR students aligned with existing and emerging areas of research strength 60% of HDR student load in selected areas of research strength by 2015 (based on 2015 data) 40% in 2011 (below annual incremental target of 45%)

Comment (Part A): Current load data indicates USC is approximately 6% down on the HDR enrolment target for 2011 (the annual HDR Load targets can be viewedin the Target Summary on page 5). An ongoing focus on HDRs, in particular in relation to the Collaborative Research Networks and other funded grants, is anticipated to see increases in enrolments in the future.

Higher Degree by Research (HDR) enrolments by EFTSL by faculty 2008-2011

Faculty 2008 2009 2010 2011 15
Arts and Social Sciences 19.8 22.5 30.0 32.8
Business 14.0 15.5 16.4 15.8
Science, Health and Education 53.3 60.8 65.3 64.5
Total 87.0 98.8 111.6 113.0
Target       120.0

Comment (Part B): The shift towards enrolments in selected areas of research strength is ongoing. The 2011 load was slightly behind the year’s target of 45%. As the revised Research Centres Policy is implemented in the coming years, targets are likely to be achieved.

Proportion of Higher Degree by Research (HDR) EFTSL in selected areas of research strength

seleCted areas 2011 eftsl15

Selected areas 2011 EFTSL 15
Sustainability Research Centre 7.0
Genecology 6.5
Health Science 32.0
Non-aligned research specialities 67.5
TOTAL EFTSL 113.0
% of total in research specialities 40%

14. 2011 data not available from HERDC until July 2012.
15. Estimates based on Census 1 and 2, 2011 data. n/a = Data not yet available.

* Updated figures will be made available at www.usc.edu.au/reports.

STRATEGIC PRIORITY FOUR - REVIEW - Develop USC for a sustainable future

Key strategies: Develop and enable staff to manage change and contribute to achievement of the strategic plan | Invest in and continuously improve information management systems, business processes and workforce planning | Advance the University through key strategic partnerships | Maximise opportunities to develop well designed, technology rich, sustainable University sites

USC is Australia’s greenest campus

The University earned full EnviroDevelopment accreditation from the Urban Design Institute of Australia during the year, thefirst university in the country to do so. The accreditation recognises efforts across six categories – ecosystems, waste, energy, materials, water and community.

Also in 2011, USC increased its wildlife refuges, with the provision of 30 man-made tree hollows around campus. The locally-designed and built nest boxes are positioned high in trees, and are attractive to a variety of animals including cockatoos, owls, insectivorous bats, kingfishers, squirrel gliders, lorikeets and possums. The boxes will become a valuable educational tool for students studying the subject Urban Wildlife Ecology.

Sustainable transport was promoted with the second annual Ride to Work Day. Participants were treated to breakfast, guided warm-down exercises, expert advice for bike maintenance and the chance towin prizes. The event was organised by Travel2USC, a group committed to raising the awareness and use of sustainable forms of transport, and supported by the Sunshine Coast Council’s TravelSmart program and Revolution Cycling.

USC’s efforts to encourage staff and students to commute using bicycles is paying off, with a survey showing that the percentage of students who ride bicycles to the University at least once a week increased from 1.65 percent in 2009 to 4.2 percent in 2011. For USC staff, this increased from 1.18 percent to 6.2 percent over the same period.

In other sustainability achievements, USCwas one of 10 key local organisations to be awarded partnership status with UNESCO’s Noosa Biosphere Reserve under the biosphere’s new alliance program to encourage the sharing of information and resources.

Revenue

The University started the year in a strong financial position, carrying an operating surplus of $15.8 million into 2011. A four percent increase in income was achieved to just over $126 million, due mainly to increased funding from the Commonwealth. While the increase in enrolments in 2011 equated to an increase in income, it also necessitated significant capital expenditure (or allocations of future expenditure) to accommodate pipeline growth.

Infrastructure and development
  • The University achieved several milestones in the development of the Sippy Downs campus (and other sites) throughout 2011:
  • a $24 million allocation from the Federal Government’s Structural Adjustment Fund, announced in December. The funds support the University’s Collaborative Futures Project, with the construction of two learning hubs, one on campus and one in Gympie, in collaboration with TAFE. It will also enable USC to develop more pathways (in partnership with TAFE), and deliver blended learning projects.
  • the new science building was completed, for teaching to commence in January 2012. The multi- storey building has three learning spaces designed to encourage student interaction, group work and active engagement in learning. The technology, furniture and the space itself indicate a more active approach to student engagement and learning.
  • the official opening of the Engineering and Science Training Facility by Federal Minister for Regional Australia, Regional Development and Local Government, Simon Crean, in May. The $5 million facility provides large open spaces suitable for concrete stress testing, hydraulic engineering experiments, photovoltaic cell testing and accident scene simulations. The facility also includes several laboratories and tutorial rooms.
  • the completion of USC’s $2.1 million Olympic-standard swimming pool. Officially opened by Queensland Sport Minister Phil Reeves in October, the heated 10-lane, 50-metre pool is used for specialised research and testing of elite athletes, while also being available for general community use. A fundraising campaign by USC alumni and the University Foundation Board contributed $90,000 towards the pool.
  • the opening of the childcare centre on campus in July. The AEIOU Foundation operates the centre, providing 66 places for children aged six weeks to five years, including servicing the specific needs of children with autism. USC donated the land for the centre.
  • a Sustainable Transport Award from the Sunshine Coast Council’s seventh annual Living Smart Awards, for the University’s concerted efforts in boosting sustainable transport use among staff and students.
  • USC was part of a National Networks application with James Cook University and CQ University to obtain funding to provide a much faster internet service on campus. There were a significant number of other ICT-related projects undertaken in 2011— refer to page 32 for more information.
Academic restructure

The retirement of Deans in two of the University’s three faculties (refer to senior staff appointments on the next page), along with the commencement of a new Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Pro Vice- Chancellor (Research) presented the University with the opportunity to review its academic structure with minimal disruption to operations. Having examined the three faculty structure in the context of the new Strategic Plan (2011-2015), and with respect to future growth plans, areas of strength, areas for improvement and the potential requirements for additional resources and leadership, the University elected to move to a two faculty model.

From 1 January 2012, the three faculties (Arts and Social Sciences; Business; and Science, Health and Education) will be consolidated into the Faculty of Arts and Business, and the Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering. The faculties will be further divided into three schools, as follows:

  • Faculty of Arts and Business
    • School of Business
    • School of Communication
    • School of Social Sciences
  • Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering
    • School of Health and Sport Sciences
    • School of Nursing and Midwifery
    • School of Science, Education and Engineering

Following the decision to move to a two faculty model, a minor review of business processes, workflows and specific services provided at faculty and school-level commenced, continuing through to the end of 2011, with the aim to establish consistency and identify efficiencies.

In 2012 a complete review of services, workflows and business processes will be undertaken to ensure the balance between services provided centrally and those located within faculties and schools is appropriate. The exercise will include process mapping of existing services and the opportunity to re-engineer existing processes to gain efficiencies.

The University Library’s biannual client satisfaction survey was conducted in 2011, with 1,589 responses (compared with 654 responses for the 2009 survey). The Library improved its ratings in every category, and the ranking for overall satisfaction puts the USC Library in the nation’s first quartile when benchmarked against other Australian university libraries.

Staff

Staff had access to a variety of professional development activities during the year, such as:

  • Cross-cultural awareness workshops
  • EO (equal opportunity) Online training
  • Change management seminars
  • Information privacy sessions
  • Middle management forums
  • Academic development workshops in lecturing and teaching
  • Research workshops in partnerships, publications and grants
  • Learning and Teaching Week
  • University Research Conference

Staff were also invited to participate in a number of University projects in 2011, such as:

  • Workshops on the development of the top level plans in line with the new strategic plan
  • Consultation sessions for the academic restructure
  • Market research focus groups
  • The national Staff Student Engagement Survey, conducted by the Australian Council for Educational Research (a first for USC)
  • The staff opinion survey (refer to results below)
Staff opinion survey

Since 2008, there has been an improvement in the positive responses received from USC staff across 83 percent of the areas surveyed. In particular, staff opinions in 2011 were very positive regarding organisational commitment, job satisfaction, a strong sense of teamwork, senior management and belief in the overall purpose and future of USC. Areas of improvement include cross-unit cooperation, communication, career opportunities, perceptions of workload and stress, and change management processes.

Senior staff appointments

Professor Rod Simpson and Professor Pam Dyer, Deans of the Faculty of Science, Health and Education and the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (respectively) announced their retirement during 2010. Their tenures officially concluded early in 2011. The recruitment process was finalised in 2011 with the following appointments:

  • Professor Joanne Scott was appointed Executive Dean, Faculty of Arts and Business, to take up the role from 1 January 2012. Previously, Professor Scott was Acting Dean, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences and Professor of History at the University of the Sunshine Coast. She was Chairperson of the University’s Learning and Teaching Management Committee from 2007-2010.
  • Professor John Bartlett was appointed Executive Dean, Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, to take up the role from 6 February 2012. Professor Bartlett was previously Dean (Elect), School of Science at the University of Western Sydney. Professor Bartlett has held senior positions with the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation and has established significant worldwide research and industry collaborations.

In other senior staff appointments, USC’s Associate Professor of Nursing, Margaret Barnes, was appointed as founding Head, School of Nursing and Midwifery, and Associate Professor Jennifer Carter was appointed as Head, School of Social Sciences.As reported in the 2010 annual report, appointments were made for the positions of Deputy Vice-Chancellor and the new Pro Vice- Chancellor (Research) during 2010. Professor Birgit Lohmann and Professor Roland De Marco commenced in their respective positions early in 2011.

Staff successes

The University received five Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) 2011 Citations for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning in 2011. The successful nominees were:

  • Dr Peter Baxter – for sustained commitment to creating opportunities for students to become successful accounting professionals, drivenby a passion for teaching and the discipline of accounting.
  • Emma Kill – for ‘making a future’: pioneering innovative programs that enable young mothers and under-represented equity groups to re-engage with and achieve a tertiary education.
  • Dr Christine Morley – for inspiring social work students to engage in critical reflection as an integral part of transformative learning and effective action for social justice.
  • Dr Fiona Pelly – for sustained leadership in the creation of professionally relevant and research- informed Nutrition and Dietetics curricula.
  • Kylie Readman – for developing and leading a collaborative, trans-disciplinary ‘Assessment Makeover’ process, mentoring colleagues to improve assessment and enhancing students’ learning experiences.

An ALTC project grant of $219,000 was also awarded to USC’s Executive Projects Unit director Don Maconachie to develop a handbook on academic leadership. The competitive grant supports a collaboration between USC and consulting company Phillips KPA, distilling key principles and practices of academic leadership from projects that have received ALTC funding since 2006. The handbook is expected to be completed by mid-2012 and is the third ALTC project grant USC has won.

A number of staff also received recognition for their work at the graduation ceremonies during the year:

  • Dr Lisa Chandler - Vice-Chancellor’s Medal for Engagement
  • Emeritus Professor Pamela Dyer and Elizabeth Cannon - Vice-Chancellor’s Medal for Service
  • Dr Christine Morley - Vice-Chancellor’s Medal for Learning and Teaching
  • Jamilla Rosdahl - Vice-Chancellor’s Medal for Learning and Teaching - Sessional Staff
  • Associate Professor Jennifer Carter - Vice- Chancellor’s Medal for Research

Staff generously supported a number of good causes throughout the year. Thirty-three teams took part in the inaugural USC Relay For Life at the USC sports stadium in April, raising $25,800 for Cancer Council Queensland. The Queensland Flood Relief Morning Tea raised more than $2000, while the Pinktober Morning Tea generated $700 for the Cancer Council. Staff also participated in morning teas held for RUOK Day.

Associate Professor of Journalism Stephen Lamble’s latest book, News as it Happens: An Introduction to Journalism, attracted national attention and awards in 2011. Published by Oxford University Press, the textbook was named the Best Designed Tertiary and Higher Education Book at the 2011 Australian Publisher Association design awards, and was judged the co-winner in the prestigious Australian Educational Publishing Awards’ category for the Best Single Tertiary Education Book by an Australian author.

Change management

In 2011, Human Resources drafted guidelines to convey the University’s commitment to managing change effectively and to support the aspiration to develop USC for a sustainable future. The guidelines are underpinned by a commitmentto change being people-centred, purposeful and process-driven.

Strategic partnerships
  • The new Regional Universities Network (RUN) was launched in October, with the following core partners: University of Ballarat, University of Southern Queensland, Southern Cross University, University of New England, CQ University and University of the Sunshine Coast. RUN is a cluster under Universities Australia in a similar way to the existing networks (Group of Eight, Australian Technology Network, Intensive Research Universities). Through the Collaborative Research Networks project and initiatives coming out of the Office of Research and the Executive Projects Unit, productive partnerships are already in place with RUN partners in the research space. Formalisation of the network in 2012 will see similar relationships established across learning and teaching, as well as engagement.
  • A delegation from USC travelled to the Indonesian island of Lombok to sign an agreement with the Provincial Government of Nusa Tenggara Barat to work with Lombok’s University of Mataram (UNRAM). USC’s Lombok Research Initiative will collaborate with UNRAM on research areas including coastal management, capacity building in sustainable tourism and language education.
  • USC continued its involvement in the planning of the Sunshine Coast University Hospital. USC signed a Memorandum of Understanding with representatives from Queensland Health, the University of Queensland, the Sunshine Coast Institute of TAFE and Queensland Health’s Clinical Skills Development Services to work together to develop the Skills, Academic and Research Centre planned for the hospital site at Kawana. Construction is planned to begin in 2013 and the centre is expected to open in 2016.
  • The University received almost $1.5 million in AusAID funding to conduct four international development projects. The competitive funding, under the Australian Leadership Awards- Fellowships program, enables USC to continue two ongoing projects and commence two new initiatives. They involve teachers and principals from Papua and West Papua in Indonesia attending USC for three months to build skills in areas such as leadership, management and information technology. Members of Cambodia’s Ministry of Tourism also will work with the University’s Sustainability Research Centre to boost their executive knowledge and leadership capacity to foster sustainable tourism in their country.
Forward planning for 2012:
  • Transition the University to an electronic records management system by end 2014.
  • Establish and support Early Career Academic community of practice by June 2012.
  • Conduct a feasibility study to investigate the demand for, and the economic, technical, operational and strategic feasibility of, implementing a Customer Relationship Management system by September 2012.
  • Promote awareness and acknowledgement of environmentally sustainable practices through the publication of results of energy, water and waste management initiatives and strategies.
  • Prepare the University for its second cycle (TEQSA) review and facilitate the review process.

STRATEGIC PRIORITY FOUR - PERFORMANCE - To develop USC for a sustainable future

KPI 4.1: Employment costs as a percentage of total revenue
Measure Target Performance
Employment costs as a proportion of total revenue (adjusted) 60% (DEEWR good practice 50%-70%) 61.24%

Comment: The 2011 employment costs as a percentage of total revenue (adjusted) result is 61.24%. The percentage reflects the receipt of operating revenue weighted to the beginning of the year, relative to the standard outlay of operating employment costs. Employment costs include associated fringe benefits tax and provisions for leave entitlements (long service leave and recreation leave) relevant to the general operations of the University (excludes employment costs associated with grants and agreements).

Total revenue (adjusted) reflects operating revenue relevant to the general operations of the University. It excludes revenue received in relation to capital grant funding, donations and research agreements.The 2011 employee benefits costs as a percentage of total revenue (adjusted) is 61.24%.

Employment costs as a percentage of revenue for USC and averages for all Queensland and Australian universities

  2009 2010 2011 Target
University of the Sunshine Coast 53.5% 56.1% 61.24% <>
Queensland universities 16 51.6% n/a n/a  
Australian universities 53.9% n/a n/a  

16. 2010 and 2011 data not available from DEEWR until 2012. Updated figures will be made available at www.usc.edu.au/reports.

n/a = Data not yet available.

KPI 4.2: Operating Margin
Measure Target Performance
Operating profit as a proportion of total revenue (adjusted) 4% annually 7.48%

Comment: The Operating Margin (operating profit as a proportion of total revenue (adjusted)) in 2011 is 7.48%. Total revenue (adjusted) reflects operating revenue relevant to the general operations of the University. It excludes revenue received in relation to capital grant funding, donations and research agreements.

Operating margin for USC and averages for all Queensland and Australian universities

  2009 2010 2011 Target
University of the Sunshine Coast 12% 15% 7.48% 4% annually
Queensland universities 8% n/a n/a  
Australian universities 2% n/a n/a  
KPI 4.3: Capital Improvements
Measure Target Performance
Proportion of operating funds invested in capital related projects 8.5% annually 13.7%

Comment: As part of the strategic planning framework, the strategic asset requirements of the University are identified and details are published in the Strategic Asset Management Plan (SAMP). Each year a portion of the University’s operating funds are allocated to the SAMP along with any external funding and available cash reserves to complete the SAMP project listing.

University operating funds largely consist of revenues generated by student load, commercial activities and investment income. It is noted that not all projects are completed within the year of allocation therefore the key performance indicator for the current and future years is based on the latest budget forecast (August 2011).

The target KPI over the 2012-2014 period is reflective of the University’s commitment to investing in information technology resources for learning, teaching and research, and the commitment to ongoing building and infrastructure construction as a result of growth in student load and research capacity.

Proportion of operating funds invested in capital related projects

  2009 (actual) 2010 (actual) 2011 (actual) 2012 (forecast) 2013 (forecast) 2014 (forecast) Target
USC total operating funds ($’000) 93,452 103,955 109,505 122,078 129,260 134,805 8.5% annually
Capital projects expenditure ($’000) 4,579 8,632 14,937 23,137 18,908 15,047  
Proportion (%) 4.9% 8.3% 13.7% 19.0% 14.6% 11.2%  

n/a = Data not yet available.

Governance

University leadership (principal officers)
Vice-Chancellor and President

University CEO, responsible to University Council for strategic development, organisational leadership and day- to-day operations of the University

Professor Greg Hill

CertTeach, BA(Hons), PhD Qld.Appointed Vice-Chancellor and President Designate in June 2010, commencing his term of office asVice-Chancellor and President in January 2011. Previously Deputy Vice-Chancellor, University of the Sunshine Coast2005-2010, Foundation Professor of Tropical Environmental Science 1995-2004 and Dean 1997-2004, Charles Darwin University. Reader in Geographical Sciences and Director of the ARC Key Centre in Land Information Studies 1979-1994, University of Queensland. Former Chair of Northern Territory Board of Studies. Former member of Kakadu National Park Research Advisory Committee. Research interests in remote sensing, wildlife ecology, resource management, environmental planning and education. Gained national recognition for teaching innovation and technology transfer to developing countries. Served on the AVCC Indigenous Advisory Committee.

Deputy Vice-Chancellor

Chair of Academic Board, overseeing the academic functions (learning and teaching) of the University, with responsibility for related support areas such as the Centre for Support and Advancement of Learning and Teaching, Information Services, Student Administration and Student Life and Learning

Professor Birgit Lohmann

BSc (Hons) Adel., PhD Flin.Appointed to the University in 2010, taking up the position of Deputy Vice-Chancellor from February 2011. Chairperson of Academic Board and member of University Council, Executive, Honorary Awards Committee, Senior Staff Forum, Equity Advisory Committee, Internationalisation Advisory Committee, and Co-Chair, Student Liaison Committee. Previously Head of the School of Science and Director of the Centre for Quantum Dynamics at Griffith University and Pro Vice-Chancellor (Learning and Quality) at the University of Adelaide. Research interests in atomic and molecular physics.

Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research)

Oversees, manages and advises the University’s research activity, aligning research effort with the University’s goals and advancing the research profile of the University

Professor Roland De Marco

BSc, MSc RMIT, PhD La Trobe, MRACIAppointed to the University in 2010, taking up the newly-created Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research) role fromJanuary 2011. Member of Academic Board and Chairperson of the Research Management Committee andthe Research Degrees Committee. Previously Professor of Chemistry, along with Chemistry Department Head (2001–2007), Dean of Research in Science and Engineering (2007–2009) and Associate Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) (2010) at Curtin University. Recipient of the 2008 RACI Lloyd Smythe Medal for excellence in research in Analytical Chemistry.

Pro Vice-Chancellor (International and Quality)

Oversees, manages and advises on internationalisation, quality improvement, and marketing and communication

Professor Robert Elliot

BA(Hons) NSW, MA La Trobe, DipEd Melb., PhD Qld.Pro Vice-Chancellor (International and Quality) and Professor of Philosophy. A founding staff member of the University. Member of University Council and Chairperson of the Internationalisation Advisory Committee and Learning and Teaching Committee. A member of Academic Board and the Student Disciplinary and Student Grievance Appeals Committees. Former foundation Dean of Arts and subsequently Dean, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of the Sunshine Coast, from 1995-2005.

Pro Vice-Chancellor (Corporate Services) and Chief Financial Officer

Oversees the University’s planning, budgeting, infrastructure, human resources, financial and information technology services and implements internal controls and risk management systems

Peter Sullivan

BBus BCAE, FCPAAppointed to the University in 2007. Attends meetings of University Council, Planning and Resources Committee, and Audit and Risk Management Committee. Previously Executive Director, Finance and Resource Planning, Queensland University of Technology. Experience in the higher education sector includes the integration of planning, budgeting, performance management and risk management frameworks in support of strategic planning and strategic financial management.

Pro Vice-Chancellor (Engagement)

Oversees the University’s links with its primary stakeholders and its regional community in achieving the teaching and learning and research priorities of the University

Professor Mike Hefferan

BA Qld., GradDipMgmt C.Qld., MAppSci, PhD Qld.UT.Pro Vice-Chancellor (Engagement) and Professor of Property and Development. Appointed to the University in 2008. Member of Academic Board, Executive and Foundation Board, and Chair of the Innovation Centre and Industry Advisory Group. Previously Director of the Institute for Sustainable Resources, Queensland University of Technology. Currently State President of the Australian Property Institute (Queensland Division), member of the API’s National Education Board, Chair of Technical and Standards Committee, Urban Development Institute of Australia and board member of Sunshine Coast Business Council. Registered Urban and Rural Valuer, Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors, member of the Property Council of Australia and the Urban Development Institute of Australia, and Vice-President of the Australian Institute of Valuers.

University Council (governing body)

Under the University of the Sunshine Coast Act 1998, the University is governed by an 18-member Council representing University and community interests.

Council has the power to manage and control University affairs, property and finances, and appoint University staff. Where allowed under the Act, Council may delegate its powers to an appropriately qualified member of Council or member of the University’s staff; or to an appropriately qualified committee that includes one or more members of Council.The Council met six times in 2011.

Council leadership

Chancellor

Leads the Council and presides at Council meetings

John M Dobson OAM

Elected Chancellor in 2007 for an inaugural term from 1 April 2007 to 31 March 2012. Re-elected in 2011 for a term from 1 April 2012 to 31 March 2017. Member of the University Council since 1997. Parish Priest of Caloundra Parish since 1982, Dean of the North Coast Deanery within the Catholic Church since 1992.Contributions to the community include founding privately-funded residential care facilities for the aged and for people with intellectual disabilities; co-founding a retirement village, and a comprehensive college (in partnership with the United Church); and developing support groups for prisoners and their families.

Deputy Chancellor

Acts as Chancellor in the absence of the Chancellor or when the office of Chancellor is vacant

David Jeffries

BCom Qld., FCA, FAICD, FFinElected Deputy Chancellor in February 2010 for an inaugural term from 15 February 2010 to 8 December 2013. Member of University Council since August 2006. Member of Foundation Board in 2008 and 2009. Elected Chair, Planning and Resources Committee in 2010, member of the committee since August 2006. Fellow, Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia, Australian Institute of Company Directors and Financial Services Instituteof Australasia. Business contributions include numerous positions as company director/adviser, and as senior executive in the financial services sector: Deputy Chief Executive of Bank of Queensland Limited, Chief Executive Officer of First Australian Building Society, State Chairman of The Institute of Chartered Accountants, Australian representative on the Financial and Management Accounting Committee of the International Federationof Accountants.

Council membership

The Council comprises three official members, six members appointed bythe Governor in Council, five elected members and four additional members appointed by the Council. 2011 was the second year of the sixth University Council. The term of office of the majority of members is four years. The term of office for student members is two years. The Council membership for 2011 was as follows:

Chancellor John M Dobson OAM
Deputy Chancellor David Jeffries, BCom Qld., FCA, FAICD, FFin
Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Greg Hill, CertTeach, BA(Hons), PhD Qld.
Chairperson of the Academic Board Professor Robert Elliot, BA(Hons) NSW, MA La Trobe, DipEd Melb., PhD Qld.(Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor) (to 14 February 2011)
Professor Birgit Lohmann, BSc (Hons) Adel., PhD Flin. (from 14 February 2011)
Six members appointed by the Governor in Council Dr Suzanne Innes, BA(Hons), BEdSt Qld., GradCertTESOL UNE, MSchM EdD C.Qld.
David Jeffries, BCom Qld., FCA, FAICD, FFin
Paul Lunn, BBus S.Qld., FCPA, CA Affil.
Julie-Anne Mee, BBus C.Qld., MAdmin Griff., FCPA
Michael Williams
Jacquelyn Wright, BBus(Comp) NTU, Master of Computing Studies Deakin, GDipEd(Adult) S.Aust., GDipEd(Primary) NTU
Two elected members of the University’s academic staff Professor Robert Elliot, BA(Hons) NSW, MA La Trobe, DipEd Melb., PhD Qld.
Dr Donna Weeks, BA(Hons) Griff., MIRAP Qld., GradCertArtsEntMgt Deakin, PhD Qld.
One elected member of the University’s general staff Bruce Williams, BA(Hons) Sunshine Coast
Two elected members of the student body Holli Mills
Carl Olive, BA Sunshine Coast
Four additional members Bruce Cowley, BComn, LLB(Hons) Qld.
Phillip Harding (to 5 October 2011)
Natasha Read, BCom Griff., MBA Sunshine Coast, FAIM, GAICD
One position remained vacant in 2011
Council decisions in 2011
  • Re-elected John Dobson OAM as Chancellor for the term from 1 April 2012 to 31 March 2017
  • Approved appointments to Council in accordance with the University of the Sunshine Coast Act 1998
  • Approved appointments and reappointments to Committees of Council
  • Approved changes to the composition of the Academic Board and the Foundation Board
  • Approved amendment of the terms of reference of the Planning and Resources Committee of Council and the Academic Board
  • Approved the timing of the process for the election of a Chancellor for the forthcoming term from 1 April 2012
  • Approved changes to University delegations
  • Noted Corporate Performance Reports against the KPIs in the University’s Strategic Plan (2005-2011) and a Corporate Performance Report against the Strategic Plan (2011-2015)
  • Approved the following top level plans (2011-2015), and performance measures and targets for them:
  • Top level plan to enable access to the USC experience
  • Top level plan to deliver high quality teaching, learning and graduate outcomes, and
  • Top level plan to build research productivity and output significantly
  • Top level plan to develop USC for a sustainable future
  • Rescinded the eight functional plans that were superseded by the four top level plans for 2011-2015
  • Approved a Strategic Asset Management Plan (2012-2016)
  • Noted December 2010, and June and October 2011 Budget Outcomes Reports
  • Approved the April and August reforecasts of the University’s Consolidated Budget
  • Approved the University Triennial Budget (2012-2014)
  • Noted Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast Pty Ltd 2010 Annual Financial Statements, financial reports as at March, July and September 2011, Statement of Governance Principles and Budget Forecast for 2012
  • Approved an appointment to the Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast Pty Ltd Board of Directors
  • Noted Student Guild audited Financial Statements for 2009 and 2010
  • Approved the themes to be proposed to AUQA for the University of the Sunshine Coast’s Cycle 2 Quality Audit (audit cancelled by TEQSA in November, refer to page 30)
  • Approved the establishment of an academic structure comprising two Faculties, each consisting of three Schools, to be effective from 1 January2012 (refer to page 18)
  • Approved the creation of the positions of Executive Dean
  • Approved nominations for Honorary Awards of the University
  • Approved a fee for membership of the USC Student Guild for Semester 2, 2011
  • Gave approval for the University to charge an annual Student Services and Amenities Fee of up to $263 per student (indexed) from Semester 1, 2012
  • Approved the acquisition by the Sunshine Coast Council of approximately 9,300m2 of University land as part of the Council’s proposal to construct an off road pathway on part of the University’s boundary on Claymore Road, Sippy Downs
  • Ratified the decision made on Council’s behalf that the University of the Sunshine Coast become a member of the Regional Universities Network
  • Undertook a mid-term self-assessment, with outcomes to be discussed at a workshop to be held early in 2012
New policies

Council approved the following new policies:

  • International Recruitment Representatives – Governing Policy
  • Public Interest Disclosure – Governing Policy
Amended policies

Council approved amendments to the following policies:

  • Doctoral Degrees – Governing Policy
  • Research Masters Degrees – Governing Policy
  • Student Academic Integrity – Governing Policy
  • Investment – Governing Policy
  • Code of Conduct – Governing Policy

Following changes to the University’s Policy Framework, Council:

  • Re-categorised the following Governing Policies as Academic Policies:
    • Assessment: Courses and Coursework Programs – Governing Policy
    • Bachelor Honours Degree – Governing Policy
    • Coursework Programs and Awards – Governing Policy
    • Learning and Teaching – Governing Policy
    • Doctoral Degrees – Governing Policy
    • Research Centres and Groups – Governing Policy
    • Research Master Degrees – Governing Policy
  • Re-categorised the following Governing and Institutional Operating Policies as Governing Policies:
    • Program Accreditation and Course Approval – Governing and Institutional Operating Policy
    • Student Conduct and Discipline – Governing and Institutional Operating Policy
  • Categorised the following uncategorised Policy as Academic Policy:
    • Internal Research Grant Schemes Policy
Rescinded policies

Council rescinded its approval of the following policy:

  • Corporate Website Governing Policy
Other activities

In addition to the above, Council:

  • undertook a mid-term self-assessment, with outcomes to be discussed at a workshop to be held early in 2012, and
  • noted the new Voluntary Code of Best Practice for the Governance of Australian Universities, and considered that it was compliant with the Voluntary Code.
University committees
Academic Board

The University’s Academic Board was established under the University of the Sunshine Coast Act 1998 as the University’s senior academic body. Its 25 members include:

  • Deputy Vice-Chancellor as Chairperson
  • Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research)
  • Pro Vice-Chancellor (International and Quality)
  • Pro Vice-Chancellor (Engagement)
  • faculty deans
  • chairs of Academic Board committees
  • heads of schools
  • two elected academic staff members from each faculty
  • three professors appointed by the Vice-Chancellor
  • an undergraduate and a postgraduate student
  • external representatives for secondary schools and TAFE
  • other senior University staff

The role of Academic Board is to:

  • advise Council on teaching, scholarship and research matters concerning the University;
  • formulate proposals for academic policies of the University;
  • monitor the academic activities of the University’s faculties; and
  • promote and encourage scholarship and research at the University.

The terms of reference of Academic Board in 2011 were as follows:

  1. To advise Council on general education directions, policies and practices onteaching, research, ethics and scholarship, and facilitate development and innovation in these areas;
  2. To approve and amend academic policy, on delegated authority of Council;
  3. To recommend to Council on the University’s areas of study and research priorities;
  4. To contribute to the development, monitoring and reviewing of relevant goals and objectives in the University’s Strategic Plan and top-level plans and to advise Council, accordingly;
  5. To monitor the academic activities of the University’s faculties;
  6. To approve schemes for internal research grants;
  7. To recommend to Council proposals that imply the entry by the University into a discipline not currently taught in the University and proposals relating to the offering of programs in existing disciplines but at a higher level;
  8. To determine the accreditation of new programs in disciplines currently taught in the University;
  9. To determine the outcomes of proposals to make major changes to existing programs and courses;
  10. To determine the outcomes of proposals to discontinue courses and programs;
  11. To confer awards on the delegated authority of Council;
  12. To monitor the work of the University Animal Ethics Committee and the University Human Research Ethics Committee, via the Research Management Committee, and advise Council on ethics related matters as required;
  13. To determine the acceptance of scholarships, bursaries and prizes above the value of $15,000 per award; and
  14. To establish committees to advise the Board on relevant aspects of the Board’s functions.
Academic Board decisions in 2011

Strategic and academic quality assurance developments in 2011 included:

  • Recommended to Council approval of relevant University top level plans
  • Endorsed the Report of the Annual Self Review of the Academic Board
  • Endorsed the Response to the Review of the Strategic Information and Analysis Unit
  • Endorsed the Response to the Review of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
  • Participated in focus group discussions regarding development of the University’s Strategic Plan and selection of themes for the 2012 TEQSA audit
  • Approved responses to reviews of the following programs:
    • Creative Writing suite
    • Information Technology suite
    • Public Relations suite
    • Graduate Diploma in Education
    • Graduate Certificates in: Professional Learning, Early Phase of Learning and VET

Policy and procedure developments in 2011 included:

  • Approved the new criteria for admission to the register of HDR supervisors
  • Approved the Internal Research Grants Scheme – Statement of Purpose and Nature
  • Approved changes to the categorisation of Academic Policies, formerly classed as Institutional Operating Policies
  • Recommended to Council that changes to the categorisation of policies of an academic nature, formerly classed as Governing Policies, be approved
  • Recommended to the Vice-Chancellor and President that the Selection to Postgraduate Research Scholarships – Managerial Policy be approved
  • Approved the new Guidelines for Nomenclature of Academic Awards
  • Approved various changes to the Research Master and Research Degrees academic policies
  • Approved the new Student Evaluation of Teaching and Courses - Academic Policy
  • Approved changes to the English Language Proficiency Requirements for selected allied health and education programs
  • Approved the new Program Review – Academic Policy

Academic Board accredited the following new programs in 2011:

  • Associate Degree in Medical Laboratory Science
  • Bachelor of Commerce (Honours)
  • Bachelor of Engineering (Mechanical)
  • Bachelor of Midwifery
  • Bachelor of Nursing Science/Bachelor of Midwifery
  • Graduate Diploma in Education (Preparatory to Year Three)
  • Graduate Diploma in Education (Primary)
  • Graduate Diploma in Education (Secondary)
  • Master of Regional and Urban Planning

Academic Board approved the discontinuation of the following programs:

  • Graduate Certificate in Early Phase of Learning
  • Graduate Diploma in Education
  • Bachelor of Education (Early Childhood)/Bachelor of Human Services
  • Bachelor of Corporate and Public Affairs
  • Bachelor of Sport and Industry
  • Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Business (Indonesian and International Business)
  • Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Business (Japanese and International Business)
  • Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science (Planning and Environmental Science)
  • Master of Financial Planning
  • Graduate Diploma in Financial Planning
  • Graduate Certificate in Financial Planning

Additionally, in 2011 Academic Board approved the following:

  • Annual Summary Reports on Student Academic Misconduct for the years 2009 and 2010
  • Changes to the composition and terms of reference of its standing committees
  • Introduction of 26 new courses
  • Discontinuation of 21 courses
  • Substantial changes to programs
  • Introduction of changes to specialisations, majors and minors
  • A change to a course code
  • Conferral of awards to students
Planning and Resources Committee

The role of the Planning and Resources Committee (PRC) is to recommend the strategic directions of the University to Council, in the context of development of the University’s plans and their resourcing strategies. The Committee also provides advice to Council on issues arising from these plans. The key areas of concern to the Committee are planning and strategy, financial resources, asset management (including information technology), and human resources.

Members of the PRC include the Chancellor, the Deputy Chancellor (who currently chairs the Committee), the Vice-Chancellor and President, one Dean or Director nominated by the Vice-Chancellor and appointed by University Council, and three external members with specific expertise in strategic financial management and planning, at least one of whom must be a University councillor. The Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Corporate Services) and Chief Financial Officer, and the Director, Capital Programs and Operations attend meetings of the Committee and have participating, but not voting, rights.

Five regular meetings and one special meeting of the PRC were held in 2011. Discussion focussed on financial matters, budget reports, reports from the University’s controlled entity (Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast Pty Ltd), planning matters including reports on outcomes for the key performance indicators in the University’s previous and current Strategic Plans, and funding and progress of capital projects. The Committee also conducted a self- evaluation.

Recommendations to Council related to:

  • reforecasts of the University Consolidated Budget
  • an appointment to the ICSC Pty Ltd Board of Directors
  • a proposed new academic two-faculty structure
  • creation of the positions of Executive Dean
  • new top level plans
  • a revised Campus Master Plan
  • staff-related policies
  • the Student Services and Amenities Fee
  • the Strategic Asset Management Plan (2012-2016)
  • the University’s Triennial Budget (2012-2014)
Audit and Risk Management Committee

The Audit and Risk Management Committee (ARMC) has five major areas of responsibility:

  1. Monitoring internal control and risk management
  2. Monitoring of internal audit activities
  3. Monitoring of external audit activities
  4. Oversight and appraisal of financial reporting
  5. Oversight of any fraud or ethics issues

Membership consists of a minimum of four and a maximum of six persons, and includes the Chancellor ex officio and at least one other member of Council. At least one ARMC member must be a member of the professional accounting or audit bodies in Australia and have a professional accounting, management consultancy or audit background. At least one member should possess expertise within the education sector. Membership is approved by Council. The initial term of office of members is a period not exceeding three years, and may be extended for further terms subject to the composition and skill requirements of the Committee.

The ARMC’s activities in 2011 were in accordance with its terms of reference and had due regard to Queensland Treasury’s Audit Committee Guidelines. Four regular meetings and one special meeting of the ARMC were heldin 2011. The Committee assessed reports on risk management, internal and external audit matters, a formal evaluative review of the University’s controlled entity, the University’s compliance with relevant legislation, and insurance, and the University’s 2010 Annual Financial Statements. The ARMC also conducted its annual self-evaluation.

The outcomes of the Committee’s discussions and advice to Councilwere provided to Council via the minutes of its meetings. The Committee recommended to Council in relation to a proposed change to its composition.

Honorary Awards Committee

The Chancellor chairs the six-member Honorary Awards Committee, which seeks, considers and recommends to Council nominations for honorary awards, in accordance with the University’s Honorary Awards – Governing Policy. In addition to the Chancellor, the Committee’s membership comprises the Vice-Chancellor and President, the Deputy Vice-Chancellor and three University Council members. The Committee met formally on two occasions in 2011 to consider honorary awards.

The following honorary awards were presented in 2011:

  • four honorary Doctorates of the University, to –
    • Stephen Hamar Midgley and Mary Margaret Midgley, for their contribution to scientific knowledge in the area of freshwater biology and ecology
    • His Excellency Barnabas Suebu, for his contributions to rainforest conservation and preservation and sustained service to the Papuan community
    • Dr Karen Woolley, for her contributions to the advancement of knowledge economics and business innovation
  • eight honorary senior fellowships of the University, to –
    • Jill Chamberlain, for her contributions to protecting and preserving the Sunshine Coast wildlife environment and commitment to community education
    • Bill Dethlefs, for his contributions to the Rotary/USC Community Fund and national and international Rotary projects
    • Beverly Hand, for her contribution and commitment to environmental and cultural education
    • Beverly Hinz, for her contribution to community liaison and commitment to regional voluntary organisations
    • Otto Klaus, for his professional and voluntary coaching commitment
    • John Shadforth, for his contribution to business, education excellence, community liaison and philanthropy
    • Jocelyn Walker, for her contribution to business, educational excellence and philanthropy
    • Valerie Zwart, for her contribution and commitment to regional voluntary organisations
  • one Emeritus Professorship of the University, to –
    • Professor Paul Thomas AM, for his contributions to the establishment and growth of the University of the Sunshine Coast, his contributions to education, and his sustained and distinguished service as Vice- Chancellor and President of the University
Foundation Board

The Foundation Board provides advice in relation to the operations of the University Foundation, which is the University’s fundraising and alumni relations arm. Foundation Board members include the Pro Vice-Chancellor (Engagement), two University Council members, and representatives of the Sunshine Coast community.

The Foundation Board met formally on five occasions in 2011. The following matters were considered at these meetings:

  • membership of the Board and the possible appointment of persons to the Board
  • fundraising priorities
  • fundraising matters generally
  • development activities
  • matters concerning the Alumni Relations Program

Two external workshops for Foundation Board members were held during the year. A formal evaluative review of the University Foundation was undertaken in 2011, and the Report of the Review was considered by the Foundation Board as part of the consultation process prior to a response to the Review Report being prepared.

Monitoring quality

The University conducts internal audits within the relevant terms of reference and has due regard to Queensland Treasury’s Audit Committee Guidelines.

The University monitors overall quality through a system of reports against performance indicators and planned targets, and scheduled regular reviews and internal audits of performance. The latter often include input from external sources.The Council, committees and senior managers monitor quality, performance, standards and outcomes via performance reports and data, particularly in relation to the University’s finances, Strategic Plan and top level plans.

Improvement plans are developed in response to review and audit findingsand regular reports on progress in achieving those plans are provided to senior University staff and such bodies as the University Executive, Academic Board and Council committees.

In response to the report on the University’s first quality audit by the Australian Universities Quality Agency (AUQA), released in 2007, an Action Plan to address matters identified in the report was developed. Monitoring of implementation of the planned actions, with associated updates of progress reports in achieving the plan, continued throughout 2008 to 2011.

Throughout 2011 the University was working towards a quality audit by theTertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA) that was due to be conducted late in 2012. In November 2011, TEQSA notified USC, and six other universities due for audit next year, that these audits will not be going ahead.

Instead, USC will focus on the re-registration process as a higher education provider, required to be submitted by all universities by 1 October 2012.

In 2011, major evaluative reviews were conducted for the following operational areas of the University:

  • Capital Programs and Operations
  • Faculty of Business
  • Financial Services
  • Student Life and Learning
  • University Foundation

A major evaluative review of Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast Pty Ltd, a controlled entity of the University, was also conducted.

Formal reviews of the following programs were also undertaken in 2011:

  • Bachelor of Arts (Creative Writing)
  • Bachelor of Business/Bachelor of Commerce (Accounting)
  • Bachelor of Business/Bachelor of Commerce (Financial Planning)
  • Bachelor of Business/Bachelor of Science (Sport Management)
  • Bachelor of Clinical Exercise Science
  • Bachelor of Commerce (Accounting)
  • Bachelor of Commerce (Financial Planning)
  • Bachelor of Sport and Exercise Science
  • Bachelor of Sport and Industry
  • Graduate Certificate in Accounting
  • Graduate Certificate in Creative Writing
  • Graduate Certificate in Creative Writing for Youth
  • Graduate Certificate in Financial Planning
  • Graduate Diploma in Accounting
  • Graduate Diploma in Creative Writing
  • Graduate Diploma in Financial Planning
  • Master of Financial Planning
  • Master of Professional Accounting

The quality system is published online at www.usc.edu.au/quality

Benchmarking

During 2011, the University participated in a range of professional and academic benchmarking activities as part of continuous quality improvement processes. The University’s inventory of benchmarking activities was updated, including recording the use made of benchmarking activities for planning and identifying improvement actions and setting improvement targets.

Controlled entities

Council approved a Policy for the Establishment and Operation of Controlled Entities in December 2006.

Innovation Centre

The University established the Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast Pty Ltd (ICSC)on 26 October 2000, under the University of the Sunshine Coast Act 1998 Part 2(6). The company commenced trading in January 2002. The Chief Executive Officer of Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast Pty Ltd reports to the Board through the Chairman, the University’s Pro Vice-Chancellor (Engagement).

The company’s mission is to support the start-up and growth of knowledge-based businesses and to promote beneficial interaction between these businesses and the University.

ICSC operates a major office facility on the edge of campus. This includes an award-winning business incubator, aimed at start-up companies, and a business accelerator, providing next stage growth space for companies graduating from the incubator and space for professional service firms.

The business incubator and accelerator are the first two phases in the development of the Business and Technology Precinct at Sippy Downs, which has the long-term potential to provide employment for 8,000-plus knowledge workers.

At the end of 2011, the Innovation Centre was home to 20 resident companies, six professional service firms with visiting offices, and six associate clientsbased in the wider region.

To date, the Innovation Centre has supported the start-up and growth of more than 80 businesses, principally in the digital, clean-tech and creative industry sectors. The Innovation Centre’s extensive program of business development and education events has attracted more than 6,000 delegates since 2002.

ICSC’s second annual Clean Futures Conference, a one-day practical conference to support the growth of business in the clean technology sector, sponsored by Sunshine Coast Council, attracted a total of 120 delegates. Two student places were also awarded to USC students.

The Innovation Centre’s UniConnect program aims to build valuable connections between businesses in the Innovation Centre community in the Sunshine Coast region and the University of the Sunshine Coast. Through the work of the Recruitment and Talent Manager, a USC graduate, the following was achieved in 2011:

  • 138 students placed in work experience roles and projects
  • 185 students visited the Innovation Centre for course sessions
  • 477 students gained exposure to the Innovation Centre via a lecture presentation

Queensland Treasurer and Minister for State Development Andrew Fraser visited the Innovation Centre in June to announce continued funding for the business incubator and accelerator. The Queensland Government had provided$1.625 million towards the Innovation Centre since it first opened in 2002, and pledged further funding of $250,000 over the next two years.

In September 2011, the inaugural CEO of the Innovation Centre, Colin Graham, resigned after 10 years of service. The recruitment process for a new CEO was finalised in late December, with the appointment of MarkPaddenburg. Previously Manager, Invest Queensland, Department of Economic Development, Employment and Innovation in the Queensland Government, he will commence at ICSC in January 2012.

The Innovation Centre maintains an online presence at www.innovation-centre.com.au

Statutory obligations and compliance
Ethical standards

In compliance with the Public Sector Ethics Act 1994, the University’s Code of Conduct defines acceptable conduct for those studying and working at the University. Amendments to the Public Sector Ethics Act 1994 required the Code of Conduct to be re-written. The ethical principles and values werechanged to ensure legislative compliance. The Code of Conduct is now shaped around four key ethical principles that are intended to guide ethical decision making and behaviour. The ethical principles are:

  • integrity and impartiality
  • promoting the public good
  • commitment to the system of government
  • accountability and transparency

All University staff were consulted on the changes to the Code of Conductand were advised of the approval of the revised Code of Conduct. The Code of Conduct is published at www.usc.edu.au/codeofconduct and on the USC Portal for staff and students to access and is provided to all new staff commencing with the University.

Best practice for governance

The University complies with the Voluntary Code of Best Practice for the Governance of Australian Universities, as implemented by the industry body, Universities Australia.

Information privacy

In compliance with Queensland’s Information Privacy Act 2009, the University has an Information Privacy Policy. A privacy statement is provided on the University’s website and appropriate privacy statements are included on all University forms.

Right to Information

In compliance with Queensland’s Right to Information Act 2009, the University has a Right to Information Policy. In compliance with the legislation, the University has a Publication Scheme on its website, setting out the classes of information publicly available. The Publication Scheme is available at www.usc.edu.au/rtiNo formal Right to Information requests were received in 2011.

Whistleblowers

With the repeal of the Whistleblowers Protection Act 1994 and the introduction of the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2010 (PID Act) on 1 January2011, the way in which public interest disclosures are to be publically reported has changed.

From 1 January 2011 agencies are no longer required to report public interest disclosures in annual reports.Under section 61 of the PID Act, the Public Service Commission (PSC) is now responsible for the oversight of public interest disclosures and preparing an annual report on the operation of the PID Act.

From 1 January 2011 agencies are required to report information about public interest disclosures to the PSC. The PSC will prepare an annual report on the operations of the PID Act andthe information provided by agencies. The annual report will be made publicly available after the end of each financial year.

Workforce planning, attraction and retention

As at 31 March 2011, the Full Time Equivalent (FTE) staffing was 744, inclusive of casual staff. This was a five percent increase on 2010, growth consistent with the University’s Workforce Planning process.

The 2010 * staff retention rate was 93 percent. The 2010 * separation rate was 7.3 percent, a decrease of more than 2 percent on 2009.

The University has a number of key policies and procedures related to workforce development and management, including provisions for work-life balance, such as flexible working hours and leave arrangements. The University also has a Certified Agreement.

In 2011, USC signed an agreement with the National Disability Recruitment Coordinator (NDRC) to promote the benefits of employing people with disability across the University and develop strategies, policies and processes to assist in their recruitment and retention.

Workplace health and safety

In 2010 *, USC average time lost to injury was zero days per workers’ compensation incident, with a total of four claims accepted during the year. Workplace health and safety audits of office spaces were conducted every three months and the University has a full-time Workplace Health and Safety Officer to ensure compliance.

Equity and work-life balance initiatives

Education and awareness of equal opportunity in the workplace was strengthened during 2011, with numerous staff harassment and discrimination workshops conducted; and all staff were required to complete an online equal opportunity training package.

The University allows for 26 weeks paid maternity leave to be paid on a50 percent basis over the 52 week parental leave period.The University also provides flexible work arrangements and job sharing options for staff returning from parental leave.

Performance management framework

The University continued to develop performance management schemes with a view to rewarding high performing staff, with Council approving a new Senior Staff Remuneration policy. All ongoing and fixed term staff are required to participate in an annual Performance Planning and Review process. New staff are inducted via an online program.

Leadership and management development

The new Strategic Plan makes clear the integral role staff will play in meeting the challenges of advancing USC’s institutional capacity. In 2011, Human Resources identified middle managers and team leaders as key groups toinvest in for the purposes of staff development, as they manage key areas and deal with the day-to-day management of staff.

Two significant professional development events, delivered by external consultants, were conducted specifically for middle managers; and three one-day workshops were conducted specifically for team leaders. Human Resources also collaborated with the Centre for Support and Advancement of Learning and Teaching to review and define the role of Program Leader, with a view to designing a program that supports the development of the leadership capabilities of staff in these roles.

Enterprise agreement

Following ongoing enterprise bargaining negotiations from 2008, the University reached a provisional agreement with the NTEU in November for the University of the Sunshine Coast Enterprise Agreement 2010-2013. In accordance with the Fair Work Act 2009, a seven-day consultation period was held for staff. A valid majority of 90 percent voted ‘yes’.

The University lodged the Enterprise Agreement with Fair Work Australia for approval. This agreement replaced all previous agreements, and will come into effect in2012 with a nominal expiry date of 30 June 2013. The University made an administrative pay increase of four percent for all staff in March 2011.

* Due to DEEWR reporting deadlines, 2010 figures are the most recent available. Updated figures will be made available at www.usc.edu.au/reports.

Carers (Recognition) Act 2008

The University of the Sunshine Coast supports the Queensland Carers Charter as detailed in the Carers (Recognition) Act 2008, through the flexible work practices and remote access facilities available to staff and students.

The University ensures staff and students are provided with relevant information and support as required. At the time of a staff member’s commencement USC provides information with regard to carer’s leave and flexible working options to assist in their caring responsibilities. This information is available on the USC Portal for staff to access.

Staff are provided with the opportunity to comment on any proposed changes to policy relating to carer’s leave or flexible working options. This includes conducting focus groups with affected staff members whose views are then taken into consideration in the formulation of those policies.

Due to the flexible working options available at USC, staff who identify as carers are able to meet both their work and caring responsibilities in an open and transparent way.

The University also has a Disability Action Plan to assist in providing equal access to quality education for the whole community; to improve the teaching and learning environment for students and staff; and to raise awarenessof disability issues and responsibilities as a foundation for good practice in equitable service provision.

There is a range of disability support services and facilities available to students, with all activities guided by the Disability Discrimination Act and the Disability Standards for Education. Support is tailored to the personal needs of each student, delivered by the Disability Services Officer. Examples of support services include physical access, better hearing, parking, assessment support, interpreters (sign), and special exam arrangements. The Learning Connections Room on campus has a variety of assistive technologies for students with disabilities.

Corporate information systems and records management

The continuing development of the University’s corporate information systems included the following activities in 2011:

  • Student information (PeopleSoft Campus Community): application functionality was further developed, in particular Australian Higher Education Graduation Statement, Student Life and Learning Amenity Fee, Academic Transcripts, Statutory Declarations, Queensland Tertiary Admissions Centre upload, Automated Results Transfer System. In addition, general maintenance updates were applied along with a major toolset upgrade, including new hardware.
  • Human Resources/Payroll (PeopleSoft): application functionality was further developed, in particular Staff Self Service functionality (Absence Balances, Online Payment Summary). In addition, general maintenance updates were applied along with a major toolset upgrade, including new hardware.
  • Academic restructure: necessary development changes were applied to Student, HR/Payroll systems and interfaces to other corporate information systems to reflect changes to the academic faculty structure.
  • Finance (Technology One): an additional Business Intelligence module was installed and a major version upgrade (v11.09) was implemented.
  • Learning management/Portal (Blackboard): a major upgrade was made to Blackboard (v9.1), along with significant change management planning with staff and students.
  • Research repository (USC Research Bank): a major upgrade (v5.2.2) was applied.
  • Research management (ResearchMaster): fixes were applied to the reporting module.
  • Corporate website: a new corporate website redesign was released.
  • Library management (Virtua): a major upgrade of the interface between Library System and the Student Information System, HR/Payroll systems was implemented, to more optimally transfer student/staff details.
  • Student feedback system (Evasys): a new system was implemented, with a pilot of two academic sessions. Full implementation across all academic sessions is scheduled for early 2012.
  • Database management system (Microsoft SQL): a major upgrade to SQL 2008, including new hardware, was made. This task required all 40 corporate information systems to be migrated. A significant number of systems also required an application upgrade.
  • Address cleansing (Experion): a new application was purchased and installed to cleanse address data to Australia Post standards for Student, HR/Payroll, Finance and donation/alumni management systems.
  • Multimedia asset catalogue and storage (Cumulus): a major upgrade (v8.5.1) was applied and herbarium data was migrated across from the research repository.
  • Student printing (Bear Solutions): an upgrade, including changing card equipment from swipe to proximity devices, was implemented.
  • Windows 7/Office 2010: a new desktop application environment was developed and piloted, with roll-out to occur in the first half of 2012.
  • Directory services and identity management system (Novell): the Novell legacy file system was retired and planning progressed for the full replacement of Novell in 2012.
  • Student and staff email: the new student system was released, while planning for staff email occurred across the year. Implementation will commence for delivery in early 2012.
  • Timetabling review: the timetabling environment was reviewed, with system and process changes to occur in 2012 and subsequent years.
  • Remote access: remote access to major systems was piloted for further roll-out in 2012.
  • Eduroam: federated wireless access was made available, allowing USC staff and students to access the internet through other universities, and allowing other institutions’ staff and students access through the USC wireless network.

Other significant systems within the University include:

  • Records management (RecFind)
  • Timetabling (Celcat)
  • Telephone PABX (Nortel)
  • Donors, friends, alumni management (Raisers Edge)
  • Card access and control (Cardax)
  • Career guidance (CareerHub)
  • Capital asset maintenance (MEX)
  • Leisure management (Links)

Under the Public Records Act 2002, the University archives full and accurate records of its activities. The University operates a decentralised corporate records management model, with faculties and cost centres responsible for the management of their records. A central Records Management Services unit provides University-wide support and advice.

Records Liaison Officers have been appointed in each faculty/cost centre to manage their respective records. Internal audits are conducted on a rolling schedule to ensure appropriate records management and staff training is undertaken on a regular basis.In 2011, the development of an information management strategy commenced. The strategy is designed to help the University manage its information assets effectively and prioritise information-related projects. Itis expected to be delivered by mid 2012.

The first round of consultation took place with staff workshops held during November. Approximately forty staff took part in the workshops, which covered information requirements and business processes in teaching, research and general administration, as well as more technical applications and architecture areas. Follow-up workshopswere held in early December. A draft blueprint and road map will be ready for broader consultation with staff in the new year.

Overseas travel expenditure

Employee Position Destination Reason for travel USC $ cost Contribution from other agencies
Office of the Vice-Chancellor and President
Hill G, Professor                    Vice-Chancellor and President United States of America Attending Triennial conference 16,656 0
Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor          
Lohmann B, Professor    Deputy Vice-Chancellor Germany and Ireland Visiting partner institutions and attending Photonic Electronic and Atomic Collisions conference 17,076 0
Office of the Pro Vice-Chancellor (International  and Quality)          
Elliot  R, Professor     Pro Vice-Chancellor, International and Quality United States of America and Canada Attending NAFSA conference and joint publication presentation 13,916 0
Elliot  R, Professor                  Pro Vice-Chancellor, International and Quality Denmark, Switzerland and Germany Attending EAIE conference and visiting partner Institutions 14,514 0
Elliot  R, Professor                    Pro Vice-Chancellor, International and Quality China Visiting partner institutions 7,678 0
Office of the Pro Vice-Chancellor (Engagement)          
Hefferan M, Professor Pro Vice-Chancellor, Engagement Hong Kong and Japan Undertaking  research for Regional Engagement book ‘Out of the Ivory Tower’ 7,838 0
Hefferan M, Professor Pro Vice-Chancellor, Engagement United States of America Attending International Town and Gown conference and case study for Regional Engagement book ‘Out of the Ivory Tower" 22,340 0
Wardner P, Ms Teaching and Research Fellow, Faculty of Business United States of America Attending  conference and conducting  PhD research and interviews 5,800 0
Office of the Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research)
De Marco  R, Professor Pro Vice-Chancellor, Research United States of America Attending Pittcon conference as invited  guest speaker 5,181 0
De Marco  R, Professor Pro Vice-Chancellor, Research Europe Attending conference and meeting with Universities in Geneva, Cologne and Leuphana 7,035 0
Russell F, Dr Faculty HDR Coordinator, Faculty Science Health and Education New Zealand Attending Deans and Directors of Graduate Studies meeting 1,508 0
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Ablett P, Dr Lecturer, Sociology Indonesia Scoping mission for research projects on development impacts in Lombok 997 0
Baldwin C, Dr Senior Lecturer, Planning Malaysia Attending International  Symposium for Society and Resource Management 2,859 0
Baldwin C, Dr Senior Lecturer, Planning Indonesia Scoping mission and research 1,989 0
Beazley H, Dr Lecturer, Human Geography Indonesia Scoping mission and research 2,603 0
Chandler L, Dr Regional Engagement Coordinator United Kingdom Attending  Visual Literacies conference 6,810 0
Hanusch F, Dr Senior Lecturer, Journalism New Zealand Attending and presenting at ANZCA conference 1,321 0
Hanusch F, Dr Senior Lecturer, Journalism New Zealand Research project 2,039 0
Janzekovic J, Dr Lecturer, Politics and International Relations Spain Attending New Directions In the Humanities conference 6,165 0
Katsikitis M, Professor Professor, Pyschology Turkey Attending and presenting at European Congress of Psychology 7,856 0
Mahnken P, Dr Lecturer, Indonesian Indonesia Scoping mission and research 1,811 0
Mahony  I, Dr Research Assistant Indonesia Scoping mission and research 1,778 0
Matthews J, Associate Professor Associate Professor, Social Science and Director, Research United Kingdom Visiting Fellow position at Leed and Lancaster University 4,193 0
Mayes G, Dr Lecturer, Tourism Indonesia Scoping mission and research 1,809 0
McCulloch R, Dr Head of School of Communication Singapore and Hong Kong Visiting various Universities 7,209 0
Morley C, Dr Senior Lecturer, Social Work Indonesia Scoping mission and research 2,070 0
Mulgrew K, Dr Lecturer, Psychology New Zealand Presenting at Australasian Experimental Psychology conference 1,819 0
Potter  A, Ms Lecturer, Communication United Kingdom Attending and presenting at The First Film and Media conference 3,613 0
Scott  J, Professor Acting Dean, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Indonesia Scoping mission and research 1,962 0
Slade C, Mrs Sessional United States of America Attending annual meeting of Agriculture  Food and Human Values Society (AFHVS) 4,112 0
Statham  D, Dr Senior Lecturer, Psychology New Zealand Attending Australian and New Zealand Psychology Clinic  (ANZPCT) Directors meeting 1,374 0
Todd K, Dr Senior Lecturer, Design Germany and United States of America Attending and presenting at Berlin conference 2,931 0
Todd K, Dr Senior Lecturer, Design Turkey Presenting paper at Inter-Society for the Electronic Arts conference 4,088 0
Todd K, Mr Senior Lecturer, Design Ireland Attenidng  meeting and undertaking  research with co- author and publisher re Neva book 1,529 0
Faculty of Business
Abbey K, Ms Administration Officer New Zealand Attending NZ Australia Accreditation conference 1,834 0
Craig  J, Dr Senior Lecturer, Human Resource Management  and Strategy United States of America Attending meetings at the Academy of Management 1,664 3,196
Debuse  J, Dr Lecturer, Information Systems United States of America Attending Information Systems Educators conference 3,624 0
Douglas E, Professor Dean, Faculty of Business New Zealand Attending Association of Asia-Pacific Business Schools meeting 1,042 0
Douglas E, Professor Dean, Faculty of Business Thailand Teaching and consultancy at Graduate Institue of Business Administration 6,942 0
Douglas E, Professor Dean, Faculty of Business United States of America Attending AACSB Annual conference and meeting 4,683 0
Douglas E, Professor Dean, Faculty of Business United States of America Attending  2011 Babson College Entrepreneurship Research conference 7,474 0
Douglas E, Professor Dean, Faculty of Business Germany Attending Executive MBA study tour 6,706 0
Fleischman  D, Mr Sessional New Zealand Attending marketing seminar and workshop 393 0
Jenner  P, Mr Sessional Scotland Attending  research meetings 4,116 0
Kerr D, Associate Professor Associate Profesor, Information Systems Taiwan Presenting paper at International DSI conference 2,998 0
Kerr D, Associate Professor Associate Professor, Information Systems United States of America Attending Decision Sciences Institute meeting 6,373 0
Lawley M, Associate Professor Associate Professor, Marketing Slovenia Attending EMAC conference 1,522 2,000
Lawley M, Associate Professor Associate Professor, Marketing Germany Undertaking  teaching and research information sessions 0 0
Miah  S, Dr Lecturer, Information Systems Korea Presenting paper at International Digital Ecosystems and Technologies conference 2,953 0
Raciti M, Ms Senior Lecturer, Marketing New Zealand Attending New Zealand and Australia Accreditation conference 1,796 0
Schaffer  V, Mrs Lecturer, Tourism Germany Visiting German Universities 4,620 0
Scheepers M, Dr Lecturer, Entrepreneurship New Zealand Presenting at APROS 14 conference 976 0
Sharma B, Dr Senior Lecturer, Management Turkey Presenting conference paper 4,677 0
Tomasich S, Ms Sessional United States of America Attending AdTech conference 5,646 0
Worthington J, Ms Faculty Administration Manager United States of America Attending AACSB annual conference and annual meeting 6,716 0
Faculty of Science Health and Education
Allen B, Dr Senior Lecturer, Education Indonesia Attending Workshop conference and post ALA Fellowship visit 3,091 0
Allen B, Dr Senior Lecturer, Education Indonesia Attending LAPIS conference 6,197 0
Allen B, Dr Senior Lecturer, Education Indonesia Briefing for West Papuan program 1,668 0
Atwell A, Mrs Lecturer, Educational Leadership Indonesia Delivering pre-departure session to ALAF participants 2,028 0
Atwell A, Dr Lecturer, Educational Leadership Indonesia Attending and presenting on AusAID project for restructure of three Provincial training centres 1,795 0
Barnes M, Associate Professor Associate Professor, Nursing United Kingdom Attending and presenting at Nutrition and Nature in Infancy conference 3,803 0
Brierty  R, Mrs Project Assistant, International Project Group Indonesia Briefing for West Papuan program 1,512 0
Brooks  P, Dr Senior Lecturer, Biological Chemistry New Zealand Attending and Presenting at Comvita Science Symposium 0 618
Burnett S, Dr Lecturer, Wildlife Ecology Nepal Undertaking field research 0 0
Burnett S, Dr Lecturer, Wildlife Ecology Nepal Undertaking field research 0 2,500
Bussey M, Dr Lecturer, History India Attending Dialogues conference 4,945 0
Bussey M, Dr Lecturer, History Sweden, Denmark and India Delivering paper at Trends and Futures conference 6,254 0
Calder A, Ms Lecturer, Coaching Science Canada Presenting as Keynote Speaker at Canadian National Speed Skating Coaches Conference 0 4,000
Carter B, Associate Professor Associate Professor, Heritage Resource Management Cambodia Attending ASEAN conference and visiting with Cambodian government 2,091 0
Carter B, Associate Professor Associate Professor, Heritage Resource Management Cambodia Attending International Intra ASEAN workshop on Sustainability and Ecotourism 3,498 0
Carter B, Associate Professor Associate Professor, Heritage Resource Management Vietnam Attending and presenting on Development of Integrates 3,607 0
Corpe C, Ms Sessional United States of America Attending and Presenting at NAPAR conference 3,115 0
Dunn  P, Dr Associate Professor, Biostatistics New Zealand Attending Volcanic Delta conference, to present and network 3,101 0
Edwards  J, Ms Research Forester and Industry Adoption South Africa Attending IUFRO Eucalyptus 2011 conference 6,413 0
Elizur A, Professor Professor, Aquaculture and Biotechnology Phillipines Attending ACIAR meeting 3,371 0
Elizur A, Professor Professor, Aquaculture and Biotechnology United States of America Attending Intensive course in Next Generation Sequence Analysis 5,827 0
Elizur A, Professor Professor, Aquaculture and Biotechnology India Attending conference as Invited  speaker 4,451 0
Elizur A, Professor Professor, Aquaculture and Biotechnology Israel Attending meetings with Collaborators 3,798 0
Framp A, Mrs Lecturer, Nursing Canada Attending and presenting at conference for Cancer 3,836 1,150
Grant E, Ms Research Assistant Solomon Islands Undertaking research 2,802 0
Gray M, Professor Professor, Occupational Therapy New Zealand Attending  research meetings 1,192 0
Hogan  S, Ms Lecturer, Education Canada Attending Canteach program 1,302 1,205
Hogan  S, Ms Lecturer, Education Canada Attending Canteach program as invited  guest 794 3,000
Hughes  R, Professor Professor, Public Health Nutrition Canada and Europe Undertaking professional development 5,290 0
Hunt J, Mr Lecturer, Education Indonesia Attending workshop conference and post ALA Fellowship visit 2,408 0
Hunt J, Mr Lecturer, Education Indonesia Delivering seminar presentations on MOU 1,558 0
Hyde M, Professor Professor, Education Indonesia Attending workshop conference and post ALA Fellowship visit 2,705 0
Keyssner U, Mr E-Learning Project Officer Indonesia Attending  Workshop Conference and Post ALA Fellowship Visit 2,435 0
Lee D, Associate Professor Associate Professor, Plant Genetics Brazil Attending IUFRO Eucalyptus conference 5,557 0
Lee D, Associate Professor Associate Professor, Plant Genetics Brazil and New Zealand Attending conferences and collaboration discussions 5,240 0
Lowe   J, Professor Head of School, Health and Sports Sciences Ukraine Attending  research facilitation meetings 9,471 0
Lowe   J, Professor Head of School, Health and Sports Sciences United States of America Receiving AAHB Research Laureate Award 4,014 0
Lowe   J, Professor Head of School, Health and Sports Sciences United States of America Presenting at University of Iowa and following up with PhD students 7,322 0
Lowe   J, Professor Head of School, Health and Sports Sciences China Visiting partner universities 4,665 0
Lowe   J, Professor Head of School, Health and Sports Sciences Ukraine Attending  research facilitation on Physician's Attitudes and Behaviour towards Chronic Disease Recommendations 14,480 0
Lowe   J, Professor Head of School, Health and Sports Sciences Shanghai and Shenzhen Presenting at conference and networking with Asia Pacific neighbours 11,781 0
Lucke  T, Dr Senior Lecturer, Civil Engineering Brazil Attending Urban Drainage conference 9,136 0
McAllister M, Professor Professor, Nursing New Zealand Attending ANE conference 1,423 0
McKean M, Dr Post Doctorate Research Fellow China Attending and presenting at National Certified Fitness Instructor conference 0 3,000
Meyers N, Professor Head of School, Science and Education Indonesia Attending workshop conference and post ALA Fellowship visit 4,873 0
Nocillado J, Dr Post Doctorate and Teaching and Research Fellow India Attending Fish Reproductive Physiology conference 2,207 0
Oprescu F, Lecturer Lecturer, Health Promotion Romania Speaking as invited  guest at Romanian workshop on the Ponseti Method for Clubfoot Treatment 3,029 0
Pelly F, Dr Senior Lecturer, Nutrition and Dietetics United States of America Attending ACSM annual  meeting 5,929 0
Randall B, Mr Research Technician Papua New Guinea Undertaking research 2,262 0
Randall B, Mr Research Technician Solomon Islands Undertaking research 3,077 0
Randall H, Mr Research Technician Solomon Islands Undertaking research 2,485 0
Robertson A, Ms English Language Teacher and Project Officer, International Project Group Indonesia Monitoring and participating in English Language training for ALAF 961 participants 1,660 0
Rosenhart L, Ms Program Adminstrator, Early Childhood Canada Attending Canteach program 2,816 0
Rosenhart L, Ms Program Adminstrator, Early Childhood Canada Attending Canteach promotional  recruitment  tour 3,526 0
Rowe  J, Dr Learning and Teaching Coordinator Indonesia Attending follow up with Fellows from IPG project 1,432 600
Sayers M, Dr Senior Lecturer, Sports Biomechanics Singapore Liaising with Singapore Polytechnic regarding future transfers between partner institutions 1,348 0
Sayers M, Dr Senior Lecturer, Sports Biomechanics Japan Presenting at World Congress of Science and Football 1,499 0
Sayers M, Dr Senior Lecturer, Sports Biomechanics Singapore Attending and presenting at Syngapore Polytechnic and Recruiting at IDP event 1,633 0
Schlacher T, Associate Professor Associate Professor, Marine Science Canada Attending workshop conference 0 3,000
Shapcott  A, Dr Senior Lecturer, Plant and Vegetation Ecology Africa Attending Association for Tropcial Biology and Conservation conference 3,477 0
Shapcott  A, Dr Senior Lecturer, Plant and Vegetation Ecology New Zealand Attending Society Conservation Biology conference 0 0
Siddique M, Dr Research Assistant Norway Attending International  Symposium on Intergrated coastal Zone Management 5,684 0
Slater G, Dr Senior Lecturer, Nutrition and Dietetics Canada and United States of America Attending workshops and undertaking professional development 463 0
Smith T, Professor Director, Science Research Centre Vietnam Presenting at GIZ - ICAM 299 1,500
Smith T, Professor Director, Science Research Centre Europe Presenting at ICZM conference and visiting Tyndal Centre of Climate Change 16,742 0
Smith T, Professor Director, Science Research Centre Cambodia Attending International ASEAN workshop on Sustainability and Tourism 4,393 0
Smith T, Professor Director, Science Research Centre New Zealand Attending  New Zealand Climate Change Research Institute and meetings 2,227 0
Solomon C, Dr Senior Lecturer, Exercise Physiology France and Germany Undertaking  research collaboration and promoting USC International 0 0
Thomsen D, Dr Senior Lecturer, Sustainability Advocacy New Zealand Attending  New Zealand Climate Change Research Institute and meetings 2,227 0
Wallace H, Professor Faculty Research Coordinator Papua New Guinea Undertaking research 2,568 0
Wallace H, Professor Faculty Research Coordinator Solomon Islands Undertaking research 2,726 0
Wallace H, Professor Faculty Research Coordinator Vanuatu Attending PARDI meetings 2,175 0
Wallace H, Professor Professor, Agricultural Ecology Solomon Islands Undertaking research 1,534 0
Wallace H, Professor Faculty Research Coordinator Solomon Islands Undertaking research 2,485 0
Warrick  R, Professor Professor, Cllimate Change Adaption Singapore Attending International Water Week conference 1,763 0
Whannell R, Mr E-Learning Project Officer Indonesia Attending workshop conference and post ALA Fellowship visit 2,435 0
Capital Programs and Operations
Muller A, Mr Security Team Leader New Zealand Attending  tertiary education Cardax User Group conference 2,324 0
Foundation
Dobson  OAM  J, Fr Chancellor United States of America Attending Global Philanthropic International Advancement tour 13,608 0
Edmonds A, Mrs Alumini Executive Officer Singapore Attending CASE Asia-Pacific conference 2,504 0
Information Services
Payne M, Mrs Branch Administrator New Zealand Attending IOP summit and AIOP executive  meetings 1,209 1,600
Centre for Support and Advancement of Learning and Teaching
Hinton T, Ms Senior Academic Advisor, Strategy and Scholarship United States of America Attending TED conference and Archival research meetings 6,093 0
Lynch K, Associate Professor Associate Professor, ICT Research and Development Uganda Furthering International network opportunities and consolidating research 6,274 0
Student Administration
Allen  P, Ms Director, Student Administration New Zealand Attending ATEM HOSA conference 1,320 0
Student Life and Learning
Blowers M, Ms Equity and Diversity Officer New Zealand Attending EOPHEA conference 1,602 0
Einfalt J, Ms Academic Skills and Language Adviser Germany Undertaking professional development program 9,270 0
Einfalt J, Ms Academic Skills and Language Adviser Ireland Presenting and attending at EATWA conference 853 0
Reeh M, Ms Academic Skills Adviser and Head of Preparatory Program Canada Visiting other Universities 4,445 0
USC International
Batzloff J, Ms Associate Director, USC International Canada Attending NAFSA conference 6,817 0
Boon M, Ms Recruitment Officer Scandinavia Visiting partner institutions and agents 10,208 0
Boon M, Ms Recruitment Officer Canada Attending NAFSA conference 4,512 0
Boon M, Ms Recruitment Officer Scandinavia Visiting partner institutions 13,567 0
Boon I, Miss Admiinstrative Project Officer Netherlands International student recruitment 557 0
Boon I, Miss Admiinstrative Project Officer Sweden International student recruitment 1,895 0
Craig M, Ms Recruitment Coordinator Vietnam Visiting partner institutions 1,195 0
Craig M, Ms Recruitment Coordinator Vietnam and Thailand International student recruitment 4,618 0
Eckard  L, Mrs Recruitment Coordinator Germany Visiting partner institutions 10,283 0
Eckard  L, Ms Recruitment Coordinator Germany International student recruitment and double degree articulations 5,754 0
Elliot  R, Professor Pro Vice-Chancellor, International and Quality Japan and Korea Visiting partner institutions and agents 10,461 0
Elliot  R, Professor Pro Vice-Chancellor, International and Quality Taiwan Attending APAIE conference and visiting partner institutions and agents 9,856 0
Martin S, Ms Admininstration and Recruitment Officer Korea, Thailand and Japan Visiting partner institutions 9,118 0
Peake S, Dr Academic Projects Coordinator South Africa Liasing with South African National Parks 5,613 0
Peake S, Dr Academic Projects Coordinator South America Liasing with South American partners 5,997 0
Peake S, Dr Academic Projects Coordinator United States of America Liasing with University of Wyoming and United States National  Parks Service 5,895 0
Qi X, Ms Adminsitration and Recruitment Officer China International student recruitment 7,974 0
Scott T, Mr Recruitment Coordinator India Attending India SIA Austrade exhibition and visiting partner institutions and agents 8,726 0
Scott T, Mr Recruitment Coordinator Taiwan Attending APAIE conference, visiting partner institutions and agents, and international student recruitment 5,057 0
Scott T, Mr Recruitment Coordinator Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore Attending education fair and Singapore Polytechnic fair and visiting agents 5,956 0
Scott T, Mr Recruitment Coordinator India and Singapore Attending IDP and Australia fair and visiting agents 8,371 0
Tamba E, Ms Director, International Relations Korea Visiting Korean Universities 51 0
Tamba E, Ms Director, International Relations Japan and Korea Visiting partner institutions and agents 19,088 0
Tamba E, Ms Director, International Relations Taiwan, China and Japan International student recruitment 10,079 0
Tamba E, Ms Director, International Relations Japan, United States of America, Korea and Malaysia Attending NAFSA Conference and international  student recruitment 17,048 0
Tamba E, Ms Director, International Relations France and Japan Attending EAIE exhibition 14,190 0
Tamba E, Ms Director, International Relations China Visiting partner institutions and agents 12,187 0
Vuille  J, Mrs Admininstration and Recruitment Officer France Attending study fair and visiting partner institutions 7,889 0
Vuille  J, Mrs Admininstration and Recruitment Officer France Visiting partner Institutions and international student recruitment 8,674 0
White  G, Mr Associate Director, Recruitment Mexico Visiting partner institutions and attending student recruitment fairs 7,505 0
White  G, Mr Associate Director, Recruitment South America Visiting partner institutions and agents 5,412 0
White  G, Mr Associate Director, Recruitment United States of America Visiting partner institutions 1,415 0
White  G, Mr Associate Director, Recruitment United Kingdom, Denmark, Germany, Switzerland and Poland Attending EAIE fair, visiting partner institutions, and marketing 12,668 0
White  G, Mr Associate Director, Recruitment United States of America Attending NAFSA conference 6,250 0
White  G, Mr Associate Director, Recruitment Germany and Switzerland Visiting partner institutions and agents, and staff and student presentations 7,141 0
        847,711 27,369

Glossary

  • AGS: Australian Graduate Survey
  • ALTC: Australian Learning and Teaching Council
  • APT: Administrative, Professional and Technical (Staff)
  • ARC: Australian Research Council
  • ARMC: Audit and Risk Management Committee
  • AUQA: Australian Universities Quality Agency
  • CCD: Census Collection District
  • CEQ: Course Experience Questionnaire
  • CGS: Commonwealth Grant Scheme
  • CRICOS: Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students
  • CRN: Collaborative Research Networks
  • DEEWR: Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (previously the Department of Education, Science and Training)
  • DIISR: Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research
  • EFTSL: Equivalent Full-Time Student Load
  • FTE: Full-time equivalent (Staff)
  • HDR: Higher Degree by Research (Student)
  • HERDC: Higher Education Research Data Collection
  • ICSC: Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast
  • ICT: Information and Communication Technology
  • PPR: Performance, Planning and Review (Staff)
  • PSC: Public Service Commission
  • QETI: Queensland Education and Training International
  • QTAC: Queensland Tertiary Admissions Centre
  • RAISE: Regional Access, Inclusion and Success in Education
  • SES: Socio-economic status
  • SSAF: Student Services and Amenities Fee
  • TEP: Tertiary Enabling Pathway
  • TEQSA: Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency
  • TPP: Tertiary Preparation Pathway
  • USC: University of the Sunshine Coast
  • WIL: Work Integrated Learning

The University of the Sunshine Coast began as the Sunshine Coast University College. Founded in 1994, the first students started at the Sippy Downs campus in 1996. In 1998 the new institution was granted full university status, and became the University of the Sunshine Coast on 1 January 1999.

The 100-hectare Sippy Downs campus lies around 90km north of Brisbane on land that was once a cane farm. Other teaching and research facilities include Dilli Village on Fraser Island and the Noosa Centre. In 2011, USC had a total operating revenue of more than $127 million and employed 744 staff (full-time equivalent).

USC has the highest rating for teaching quality, generic skills, and graduate satisfaction of any public university in Queensland *. In 2011, more than 7,700 students (including about 680 postgraduates and 800 international students) enrolled in more than 150 academic programs through three faculties: Arts and Social Sciences; Business; and Science, Health and Education. The University conferred around 1,500 degrees, bringing alumni numbers to more than 9,900.

*The ratings of five stars for teaching quality and generic skills, and four stars for graduate satisfaction were awarded to USC by the Good Universities Guide 2012 using information obtained from Graduate Careers Australia’s Course Experience Questionnaire, the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, and the University.

The University of the Sunshine Coast was the first greenfield university to be established in Australia since 1975. Founded in 1994, USC took its first 500 students at the Sippy Downs campus in 1996. Enrolments grew to more than 7,700 in 2011, with the student population projected to double in the next decade.

The 100-hectare campus lies 90km north of Brisbane on land that was once a cane farm. The University has won many architectural awards and is part of a wildlife reserve.

Maroochydore DC Qld 4558
Australia

Tel: +61 7 5430 1234
Fax: +61 7 5430 1111
Web: www.usc.edu.au

CRICOS Provider Number: 01595D

The University of the Sunshine Coast’s full statutory annual report is available online at www.usc.edu.au/reports. Copies of the 2011 annual report are available from the Administrator, Office of Marketing and Communications, University of the Sunshine Coast, by telephoning +61 7 5459 4558 or faxing +617 5430 1187.

© University of the Sunshine Coast 2012 | Published by University of the Sunshine Coast March 2012. | Information contained in this publication was correct at the time of publishing. For the most up-to-date information about the University, visit www.usc.edu.au | All amounts are in Australian dollars. University of the Sunshine Coast is registered on the Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students.

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