Indigenous Education Statement 2014

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Indigenous Education Statement 2014

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The University of the Sunshine Coast acknowledges all traditional custodians of the land and recognises the strength, resilience and capacity of Aboriginal people in this land.

Section 1 Achievement of National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Policy (AEP) goals in 2014 and plans for future years

1. Establish effective arrangements for the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in educational decision-making.

Higher level and broader participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the governance structures and practices of the University of the Sunshine Coast (USC) is a key outcome area of the USC Reconciliation Action Plan. It is reflected in the involvement of Indigenous students, staff, and community elders and leaders in the following activities and roles:

  • University of the Sunshine Coast Council (one community elder).
    • Council is the University’s governing body determining and overseeing the vision and strategic direction of the University.
  • Vice-Chancellor’s Indigenous Advisory Committee (13 Indigenous USC and community members).
    • The Chairperson of the Indigenous Advisory Committee is an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander member of University Council.
    • Membership includes representatives from community, government, professional and industry bodies, academic institutions, and Indigenous academic staff and students of USC.
    • The Committee makes recommendations to, and advises, the Vice-Chancellor on Indigenous policy matters relevant to the University. The role of the Committee is to provide strategic advice and guidance on the achievement of outcomes for Indigenous students and staff, and research and curriculum matters.
  • Vice-Chancellor’s Student Liaison Committee (one student representative).
    • A Chairperson of the Buranga Indigenous Students Committee is a member of the Student Liaison Committee.
    • The Committee is a student representative forum informing the Vice-Chancellor about emerging student issues and also discusses annual prioritisation of the Student Services and Amenities Fee allocations.
  • Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Advisory Committee (nine members including two elders).
    • An advisory committee to the USC School of Education established as a strategy of USC’s More Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Teachers Initiative (MATSITI) goals.
  • Buranga Indigenous Students Committee (two Co-Chairpersons).
    • A student group representing the voice and interests of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Australian South Sea Islander students at USC.
  • Head of Indigenous Services, Buranga Centre (one Head of Service).
    • The Head of Indigenous Services is a manager in the USC Student Life and Learning department, responsible for supervising and developing services provided through the Buranga Centre that improve the education outcomes of Indigenous people, and the provision of cultural advice and expertise to the University.

In addition to these appointments, Indigenous staff and students at USC attended meetings with state and national bodies which strengthen their capacity and participation within the education sector:

  • Queensland Indigenous Higher Education Network;
  • Sunshine Coast Institute of TAFE Indigenous Advisory Committee;
  • National Indigenous Tutorial Assistance Scheme (ITAS) Network;
  • Annual Queensland Student Leadership Forum (Brisbane – two student representatives);
  • Annual National Student Leadership Forum: on Faith and Values (Canberra – two student
    representatives).
2. Increase the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people employed as academic and non-academic staff in higher education institutions.

The University’s current Indigenous Employment and Career Development Strategy was developed in 2010 and outlines USC’s commitment to increasing the recruitment, development and support of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in academic and non-academic roles in higher education. The Strategy was developed with John Pearson Consulting and was informed through community and staff consultation. It reflects the employment priority areas identified by the Indigenous Higher Education Advisory Council.

The Indigenous Employment and Career Development Strategy is publicly accessible on the USC website at Indigenous Employment and Career Development Strategy.

Indigenous-specific positions at the University of the Sunshine Coast are:

  • Indigenous Early Career Academics (two)
  • Indigenous Early Career Professional Staff (one)
  • Indigenous Cadets (three).

The USC Indigenous Employment and Career Development Strategy is undergoing review and renewal in 2014. The University is currently consulting with key stakeholders and sector leaders including Ms Melissa Williams (Director, Office of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment and Engagement), University of Western Sydney.

Current number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff (2014)

Table 1 – Permanent positions

Faculty/Institute/SectionAcademic/Non-AcademicPosition titleNumber
  • Faculty of Arts and Business
  • Faculty of Science, Health,  Education and Engineering

Academic

Teaching and Research

3

  • Buranga Centre
  • Faculty of Science, Health,  Education and Engineering

General

Professional/Administration

3

Total

 

 

6

Table 2 – Casual and fixed-term positions

Faculty/Institute/SectionAcademic/Non-AcademicPosition titleNumber
  • Faculty of Arts and Business

Academic

Teaching and Research

3

  • Chancellery
  • Buranga Centre
  • Events and Catering
  • Faculty of Arts and Business
  • Human Resources
  • Marketing and Communications
  • Student Life and Learning

General

Professional/Administration/Cadetship

18

Total

 

 

21

3. Ensure equitable access of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to higher education.

The University of the Sunshine Coast has sustained annual increase in the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student enrolments for the past nine years (2.2% of domestic enrolments in 2013), with the success ratio of those students consistently exceeding Queensland and national performance data since 2006. USC has also consistently achieved an enrolment rate of Indigenous students that is higher than the proportion of Indigenous people in the Sunshine Coast population (1.5% at 2011 Census), and the national university participation rate for Indigenous students in higher education (1.4% from 2009 to 2012).

Practical assistance for new and continuing students includes the availability of a range of private and Commonwealth scholarships. These are promoted on the university website, in print resources, via outreach activities to prospective students (including Murri Pathways, AIME, USC Open Day, and Orientation events); and to enrolled students through broadcast email, social media (including the Buranga Centre Facebook page), financial assistance presentations, and individual guidance with scholarship and bursary applications.

The Buranga Centre’s role in ensuring equitable access of Indigenous students to higher education includes key aspects of leading practice (“Can’t be what you can’t see” [2014] Nulungu Research Institute) enabling prospective students to make informed choices about study and careers:

  • Early student engagement and aspirational programs (dedicated outreach programs eg. Murri Pathways; collaboration with AIME, uni experience days on campus, community events, community celebration with new graduates). The new Buranga Centre opened in February 2014 and achieved USC’s goal to provide a “nexus for academic services as well as a place for Indigenous community to meet. Collectively these aim to raise the confidence and aspirations of secondary students who may be considering university study at USC.” [Eidos – Indigenous Sunrise Project 2009];
  • Preparedness pathways and enabling programs (AIME, Tertiary Preparation Pathway, IDEAS alternative entry);
  • Finance and employment pathways (raising the awareness of prospective students about targeted scholarships and bursaries, and cadetship and graduate employment programs).

Commencing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students *

EFTSL student data

Students20122013

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

49

61

Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students (Domestic students only):

2,532

2,813

Source: 2012 and 2013 from HEIMS ‘Student EFTSL Summary Report’ by Citizenship and ‘Student Enrolment Summary Report’ – Indigenous tables

All student data

Students20122013

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

81

112

Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students (Domestic students only):

3,887

4,213

Source: 2012 data provided by Department of Education. 2013 from HEIMS ‘Student Enrolment Summary Report’ – Indigenous tables

Programs to improve access

Program NameTarget audienceOutline of ProgramOutcome

Targeted scholarship opportunities

Indigenous students including Headstart students in Years 11 and 12 of high school.

Indigenous and Australian South Sea Islander students

113 new scholarships/bursaries were awarded in 2013.

Indigenous Direct Entry and Access Scheme (IDEAS)

Any Indigenous applicants.

All QTAC applicants identifying as Indigenous are invited to participate in IDEAS. Panel interview and assessment of applicants’ skills, experience and aspirations, may lead to offer of admission into a degree program or guide applicants to consider TPP as a preparatory program.

Eight students received admission offers through this entry pathway in 2013.

Tertiary Preparation Program (TPP)

Any prospective adult learners.

Prospective undergraduate students experience university life before committing to a degree program. Students undertaking TPP are provided with access to the same services and facilities offered to all Indigenous students, including additional tutoring.

48 Indigenous students were enrolled in TPP in 2013.

Headstart entry

High school students in Years 11 and 12.

Prospective visiting students experience university life before leaving high school. Academic credit is awarded towards USC degrees, and students gain entry into many USC degrees with successful completion of two courses.

One Indigenous student completed Headstart in 2013. 18 Year 12 students were AIME mentees with full completion of their senior year and 11 students progressing to further education.

Outreach activities

Outreach activityTarget audienceOutline of ProgramOutcome

Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience (AIME)

High school students in Years 9 to 12.

Engaging 16 schools from Redcliffe to Gympie. Indigenous high school students are mentored/tutored by USC students, with the goal of increasing school retention and Year 12 completions.

215 High school students participated in 2013 (increased from 136 in 2012).

“Murri Pathways”
(since 2008)

High school students and their families.

Collaborative touring presentation promoting post-school options including traineeships and apprenticeships, certificate and diploma courses, defence jobs, sports and health careers, the Headstart program, TPP and undergraduate courses.

Annual increase in school leaver enrolments 2011 to 2013, with 26 Indigenous school leavers enrolled last year.

Participation in community events and groups, and links with schools, TAFE and other VET providers – to demystify higher education and promote aspiration for tertiary study.

Prospective adult learners and high school students.

  • Sunshine Coast Indigenous Network Group
  • Booin Gari
  • SCIT Indigenous Advisory Committee
  • North Coast Aboriginal Corporation for Community Health “Well Person’s Health Check Days”, Gympie/Maroochydore
  • NAIDOC events Brisbane/Sunshine Coast
  • Indigenous Jobs Market/FOGS EmploymentExpo/Caboolture Skills Expo
  • USC Open Day
  • local Indigenous youth events.

Annual increase in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student enrolments at USC for over nine years.

Scholarships details (new 2013)

Scholarship detailsGovernment/Private/UniversityNo. AllocatedCostNo. AwardedComments

Indigenous Access

Government

18

$111,816

24

 

Indigenous CAS

Government

5

$24,695

4

 

Indigenous CECS

Government

15

$49,380

20

 

Indigenous Enabling CAS

Government

3

$14,817

1

 

Indigenous Enabling CECS

Government

10

$24,690

10

 

Headstart - Indigenous

USC

3

$1,200

3

$400 one-off payment

Jaralema Scholarship

Private

1

$1,000

1

 

Rotary Scholarship

Private

0

0

0

New recipient in 2014

Indigenous Honours/
Post Graduate

USC (HEPPP)

1

$4,000

1

 

Equity Bursaries

USC (HEPPP)

 

$49,000

49

 

 

 

Total:

$280,598

113

 

Scholarships details (continuing 2013)

Scholarship detailsGovernment Private/UniversityNo. AllocatedCostNo. AwardedComments

Indigenous CAS

Government

 

$86,415

10

 

Indigenous CECS

Government

 

$2,469

35

 

Indigenous Enabling CAS

Government

 

$49,390

1

 

Indigenous Enabling CECS

Government

 

$4,939

1

 

Jaralema Scholarship

Private

1

$2,500

1

 

Rotary Scholarship

Private

1

$3,750

1

 

Indigenous Honours/
Post Graduate

USC (HEPPP)

1

$8,982

1

 

 

 

Total:

$158,445

50

 

4. Achieve the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in higher education, at rates commensurate with those of all other Australians.

USC’s progress in achieving increased participation rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in higher education is informed by the Universities Australia Best Practice Framework for Indigenous Cultural Competency in Australian Universities (2011), and USC’s collaborative work in the Eidos “Indigenous Sunrise Project – A School to Universities Pathways Project” report (2009). These documents provide guiding principles for the development of student and adult learner pathways to study at USC, strategies to increase attainment, and promotion of excellence in teaching and research in Indigenous studies.

USC delivers a collaborative model for Indigenous student success that is distinctively different to many other tertiary providers. The Buranga Centre is a student development unit within the Student Life and Learning department and functions as part of a multi-disciplinary team that includes Indigenous and non-Indigenous professionals in education, psychology, social work, health, and career guidance.

Key aspects of the Buranga Centre’s role in enabling Indigenous student participation include:

  • Academic skills development (building preparedness in academic writing and study skills from pre-orientation to higher degree study, and supporting students at risk of leaving);
  • Facilitating mentoring and community relationships (sustained community and family engagement through peer mentoring, and AIME mentoring in high schools; connection with elders and community leaders on campus);
  • A continuum approach to studentship and employment (early career guidance and planning, and promotion of employment pathways including cadetships and graduate recruitment programs);
  • Policy development and strategies (informing review and renewal of key University strategies including the Indigenous Employment and Career Development Strategy, Equity Policy, Reconciliation Action Plan, and Student Life and Learning Operational Plan).

The total number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student enrolments for 2012 and 2013 is as follows:

EFTSL student data

Students20122013

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students:

110

143

Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students (Domestic students only):

5,844

6,374

Source: 2012 and 2013 from HEIMS ‘Student EFTSL Summary Report’ by Citizenship and ‘Student Enrolment Summary Report’ – Indigenous tables

All student data

Students20122013

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students:

165

211

Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students (Domestic students only):

8,789

9,309

Source: 2012 data provided by Department of Education. 2013 from HEIMS ‘Student Enrolment Summary Report’ – Indigenous tables

Strategies to address participation

StrategiesOutline of strategiesConstraintsOutcome

Indigenous Orientation program and camp (holistic support)

Includes academic skills workshops, tours of the campus and facilities, and personal introductions to staff. This enables a comfortable transition into university life.

In 2013, an Orientation camp was held for the first time at Mudjimba. Commencing students were welcomed by current Indigenous students, staff, and community elders and leaders.

The Indigenous Orientation is held in the week prior to the general O Week, which can limit attendance. An overnight camp was difficult for some students with family commitments.

The retention ratio of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students at USC (0.96) exceeds Queensland (0.87) and national (0.85) retention ratios for 2011 (latest data available).

The 2012 success ratio (0.86) exceeds both Queensland (0.82) and national (0.83) ratios (latest available data).

Culturally welcoming academic environment

A culturally welcoming environment that includes access to reference books and laptop computers, and “IT Yarning” tech workshops. Students have a dedicated study area and social room in the Buranga Centre and adjoining cultural gardens.

 

Regular student social events and celebrations of success

Events including BBQs and morning teas are held with Indigenous students, academic and professional staff, and community elders and leaders. Ongoing social, emotional and cultural programs are available to all students.

 

Indigenous Tutorial Assistance Scheme

Academic skills development, funded through DEEWR, was provided on campus and at the USC Gympie learning hub in 2013.

 

59 Students received ITAS tutoring in 2013, with over 89% of students passing those completed courses.

Cadetships

Promoting workplace learning opportunities and experience available through the Indigenous Cadetship Support program.

Sourcing cadetship opportunities in the field of some students’ study.

Over 35 cadets have been placed with employers since 2010, with 15 of those employed at USC.

Promoting wellness

Staff of the Buranga Centre are Referrers with North Coast Aboriginal Corporation for Community Health (NCACCH). The Corporation provides health services for Indigenous community members in the Sunshine Coast and Gympie areas, and delivers preventive health services from the Buranga Centre including Flu vaccinations.

 

Indigenous students, staff and community members are able to access the Buranga Centre for health referrals.

5. Enable Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to attain the same graduation rates from award courses in higher education as other Australians.

USC’s goals for increasing the retention and completion rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students involve a multi-strategy approach that delivers best-practice wellbeing and learning initiatives, strong community presence and engagement, and campus-life activities that enhance the education experience. The University places high importance on students’ sense of connectedness and belonging at USC.

The Buranga Centre’s role in enabling Indigenous students to attain the same completion rates as other Australians includes:

  • promoting student-to-student networking and learning opportunities (through Mentor, Peer Adviser and ITAS programs that assist students in transition and engagement with study);
  • widening service access through regular outreach to off-campus learning hubs (eg. Gympie);
  • facilitating professional and personal development opportunities (student membership of University committees; promotion of GO program overseas study; sponsorship to attend annual national and state leadership forums; three students will also attend a cultural study tour to the University of Wyoming in 2014);
  • promotion of new Indigenous post-graduate scholarships and designated identified academic and professional appointments.
Degree completions20122013

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Higher Degree)

1

0

Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Higher Degree)

16

21

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Other postgraduate)

3

5

Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Other postgraduate)

211

291

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Bachelor degree)

6

21

Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Bachelor degree)

989

1,119

Source: 2012 and 2013 from HEIMS ‘Student Enrolment Summary Report’ – Indigenous tables

Support mechanisms

Support mechanismsDescriptionConstraintsOutcome

Academic and personal assistance

Students are able to access academic skills advice, financial assistance, accommodation support, and health and wellbeing advice.

Buranga Centre staff are referrers through the North Coast Aboriginal Corporation for Community Health and can organise free medical and dental consultations for Indigenous students.

 

Success and retention outcomes for Indigenous students at USC consistently exceed state and national comparative rates, with retention outcomes close to parity with non-Indigenous domestic students at USC.

Celebration of success

Student achievement is acknowledged and celebrated through biannual Indigenous graduate and family events, where students are presented with an Indigenous stole to wear at Graduation.

 

26 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students completed award programs in 2013.

Student and graduate connection

Regular social activities are held throughout each semester for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students, and a Buranga Centre Facebook page was established in 2013 for students to connect, share information, and promote events, employment, and scholarship application activities.

 

205 students and graduates are members of the Buranga Centre Facebook page.

Providing a valued and inclusive learning experience

USC has one of the highest proportions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students of all the universities in Australia. Inclusive learning environments and flexible multi-modal teaching and learning strategies are key to USC’s approach to universal design in education.

 

USC’s Indigenous student participation has consistently received four stars in the Good Universities Guide; with teaching quality and overall graduate satisfaction rated at five stars.

6. To provide all Australian students with an understanding of and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander traditional and contemporary cultures.

The USC Top Level Plan 2 – “Deliver high quality teaching, learning and graduate outcomes”, includes embedding Indigenous perspectives in curriculum design, as a key strategy. This is achieved through:

  • Specific courses in TPP, undergraduate and postgraduate offerings, including
    • TPP106 An Introduction to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Societies
    • EDU410 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Perspectives in Learning and Teaching
    • EGL206 Reading Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Writing
    • GEO210 /310 Indigenous Peoples and the Environment
    • GEO700 Indigenous Peoples and Sustainability
    • PSY302 Intercultural and Indigenous Psychologies
    • SCS130 Introduction to Indigenous Australia
    • SCS203 Introduction to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education
    • SCS210 Indigenous Australia and the State
    • SCS251 Working Effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People
    • SCS751 Engaging Effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People.
  • Indigenous content in program offerings, including:
    • Tertiary Preparation Pathway
    • Bachelor of Environmental Science
    • Bachelor of Education
    • Bachelor of Health Promotion
    • Bachelor of Laws
    • Bachelor Nursing Science
    • Bachelor of Occupational Therapy
    • Bachelor of Social Work
    • Bachelor of Sport and Exercise Science
    • Diploma of Justice (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander)/Bachelor of Justice and Legal Studies.

In addressing the cultural competency of its staff and students, the University provides co-curricular activities that raise awareness of Indigenous knowledge and culture including:

  • cross-cultural training workshops delivered each semester;
  • staff development workshops on inclusive teaching practice;
  • the annual USC Indigenous Education Symposia, which aim to facilitate understandings between educators, students, and Indigenous Australians;
  • 2013 collaboration and launch of the website “Gubbi Gubbi: A Traditional Language Journey”, providing an introduction to the language, history and culture of the Gubbi Gubbi people and country in South East Queensland (www.gubbi-gubbi-language.org.au);
  • cultural awareness training provided for ITAS tutors;
  • introduction of Equity and Diversity Awards (2014) to encourage and recognise outstanding initiatives and achievements that support USC’s equity and diversity objectives;
  • ecological knowledge tours of the USC campus, increasing awareness and appreciation of Indigenous issues and culture;
  • connecting students to the experience, inspiration and vision of important members of the local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community;
  • events recognising cultural days of significance are held on campus and in the community.

Community members are included in formal and ceremonial University occasions, with traditional blessings opening every USC Graduation Ceremony. Protocols for acknowledging the traditional custodians of the land, and inviting community members to provide a Welcome to Country, are published on the USC website. The Nyabung Djamga Gallery at the USC Innovation Centre was named in 2011 with a smoking ceremony with Indigenous elders, and the USC Art Gallery has always prominently featured traditional and contemporary Indigenous art with an education resource supporting the Western Desert art collection available online for school teachers since 2008.

The Buranga Centre holds a broad role in promoting cultural competency on campus, and respectful partnerships with communities. Buranga staff are invited to deliver guest lectures into courses; along with members of the Vice-Chancellor’s Indigenous Advisory Committee, they are consulted on learning and teaching projects and research ethics approval applications with Indigenous content. The expanded Buranga Centre facility (opened 2014) includes an adjoining cultural public gathering place, designed through consultation with the Vice-Chancellor’s Indigenous Advisory Committee. This community place is an interpretation of the traditional Gubbi Gubbi yarning circle (Nga Tana Lui Dhar), and includes areas representing the elements of earth, air, water and fire. It provides a prominent place to promote cross-cultural understandings and advance knowledge about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander societies, values and traditions. The Centre is a supportive inspirational environment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to explore learning, leadership and planning for the future.

Section 2 Expenditure of Indigenous Support Program Grant

Acquittal Summary Details (excluding GST)
IncomeAmount
1. Unexpended Indigenous Support Program funds from 2012 which were    committed for expenditure prior to 31/12/2012. $0
(+) 2. Unexpended and uncommitted    Indigenous Support Program funds from 2012 which were approved for    expenditure in 2013. $104,846
(+) 3. Indigenous Support Program funds provided    in 2013. These amounts appear on    Recipient Created Tax Invoices (RCTIs) or Payment Advice Letters. $355,000
(+) 4. Interest, royalties and other income    derived from Indigenous Support Program funds in 2013. $0
(=) 5. Total Indigenous Support Program funds to    be acquitted in 2013. $459,846

 

ExpenditureAmount
6. Total Indigenous Support Program expenditure in 2013, excluding any GST. $414,915
(+) 7. Unexpended Indigenous Support Program funds    which were committed for expenditure prior to 31/12/2013. $0
(+) 8. Requested carryover into 2014 of unexpended    Indigenous Support Program funds which were not committed for expenditure by    31/12/2013 – written approval date /…/2014.1 $
(=) 9. Total Indigenous Support Program Funds    which by 31/12/2013 were fully expended and/or committed for expenditure. $414,915
10. Returns of 2013 Indigenous Support Program Funds by 31/12/2013. $
11. Balance of Funds for 2013 (Unexpended/uncommitted Indigenous Support    Program funds to be returned or recovered from 2014 entitlements). $
12. Balance of provider’s    Indigenous Support Program bank account or cost centre as at 31/12/2013. $44,931

1  The Department will only approve the rollover of unspent funds in exceptional  circumstances.

Breakdown of ISP Expenditure (excluding GST)Amount

Salaries

$297,370

Travel

$8,378

Other    operating costs (promotional material, accommodation, Indigenous Education    Symposium, Orientation camp)

$43,817

Higher    Education provider overheads (events, printing, motor vehicle expenses, ITS,    postage)

$65,350

(=) Total 2013 ISP Program Expenditure

$414,915

 
Optional Information Breakdown of Non-ISP expenditure  to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander studentsAmount
ITAS $203,533
Scholarships and bursaries (including HEPPP $61,982) $439,043
Other Buranga Centre salaries (USC) $142,011
(=) Total of Non-ISP expenditure $784,587

Section 3 Higher Education provider's contact information

University Officer

Director, Student Services Dr Eva-Marie Seeto
Phone: + 61 7 5430 1226
Email: eseeto@usc.edu.au

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