Indigenous Education Statement 2016

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Indigenous Education Statement 2016

Breadcrumbs

The University of the Sunshine Coast acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of the land on which its campuses are located and recognises the strength, resilience and capacity of Aboriginal people in this land.

Section 1 Achievement of National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Policy (AEP) goals in 2014 and plans for future years

1. Establish effective arrangements for the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in educational decision-making.

The University of the Sunshine Coast (USC) has a strong commitment to the development of national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Higher Education goals. This commitment is reflected in the University’s Strategic Plan 2016-2020 with further details provided in the USC Reconciliation Action Plan. USC Indigenous Services commenced operation in 2000 as the Buranga Centre. A small cultural assistance unit for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students, located on the Sippy Downs campus. Today, Indigenous Services engages with over 300 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students across four campuses (USC SouthBank (Brisbane), USC Sippy Downs, USC Gympie and USC Fraser Coast and learning hubs at Noosa, Caboolture and North Lakes (all Queensland). The University of the Sunshine Coast (USC) values its relationships with the Traditional Custodians of the lands on which its campuses sit. USC Sippy Downs, USC Gympie and Noosa are located on the land of the Kabi Kabi/Gubbi Gubbi people. USC SouthBank and North Lakes are located on the land of the Yugarabul, Yuggera, Jagera and Turrbal peoples. USC Fraser Coast and the USC Fraser Island Research and Learning Centre, Dili Village is located on the land of the Butchulla/Batjala/Badtjala people.

 

Social justice is one of six key values of the University and acknowledges the unique and important place of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples <insert direct quote>. The University has developed a collaborative approach to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander success that is distinctively different to many other tertiary providers. For example, Indigenous Services is a student empowerment service within the Pro Vice-Chancellor (Students) portfolio and functions as part of a multi-disciplinary team that includes Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander as well as non-indigenous professionals in areas such as higher education, psychological wellbeing, disability services, health promotion, academic skills, program advising and career guidance.

 

The University acknowledges the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The University values and particularly appreciates the close relationship with those Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples on whose land it has a presence. The University embraces the opportunities that this relationship offers, recognising that as an institution of higher education it has responsibilities and a unique capacity to develop partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities across a broad range of areas that will be mutually beneficial. In particular, the University works collaboratively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to address social injustice in education and employment opportunities; directly through its role as a major employer in the region and as an institution of higher education with potential to contribute through its research and education to capacity-building and wellbeing within the community.

 

Effective arrangements for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to participate in institutional governance and decision making is a key strategy of the University and is detailed in the USC Reconciliation Action Plan. In the 2014 IES, the University reported that 26 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were involved in institutional governance and decision-making bodies. In 2015, 48 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students, staff and community Elders and leaders were involved through the following activities and roles:

 

University of the Sunshine Coast Council (1 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community Elder of 17 members)

  • Council is the University’s governing body determining and overseeing the vision and strategic direction of the University.

 Vice-Chancellor’s Indigenous Advisory Committee (13 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander members of 19 members)

  • The Chairperson of the Indigenous Advisory Committee is a member of University Council who is of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent.
  • Membership includes Elders as well as representatives from community, government, professional and industry bodies, academic institutions, and Indigenous academic staff and students of USC.
  • The Indigenous Advisory Committee makes recommendations to, and advises, the Vice-Chancellor and President on policy matters relevant Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people engaging with the University. The role of the Committee is to provide strategic advice and guidance on the achievement of outcomes for Indigenous students and staff, and research and curriculum matters.

 Vice-Chancellor’s Student Representative Council (2 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student representatives)

  • The male and female Co-Chairs of the Buranga Indigenous Students Committee are members of the Student Liaison Committee.
  • The Committee is a student representative forum convened by the Office of the PVC(S) which informs the Vice-Chancellor about issues of relevance to student learning and the student experience. It also provides advice on the annual prioritisation of Student Services and Amenities Fee allocations.

 Reconciliation Action Plan Committee (7 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander members, 4 staff, 1 community, and 2 students of 13 members)

  • The University of the Sunshine Coast acknowledges the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The RAP Committee. The RAP Committee works to embrace the opportunities that this relationship offers, recognising that as an institution of higher education it has responsibilities and a unique capacity to develop partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities across a broad range of areas that will be mutually beneficial.

 Embedding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Knowledges and Perspectives in Curriculum Working Party of Academic Board (14 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander members – designated positions for 9 members of the WP) and its Reference Group where all members (staff, students and community) are Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

  • Since 2014, the University of the Sunshine Coast has been developing a framework and action plan to progressively provide all students with the opportunity to encounter and engage with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledges and perspectives as an integral part of their program of study. A USC-wide working party co-chaired by the PVC(S) is charged with this work.
  • A Reference Group, chaired by a senior female Aboriginal Adjunct Professor of USC, who is co-chair of the Working Party, provides advice to the Working Party.

 Human Research Ethics Committee (1 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander member)

  • The University of the Sunshine Coast Human Research Ethics Committee (USC HREC) is responsible for ensuring that research involving humans is conducted ethically and that the welfare and rights of human participants in research are protected.

 Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Advisory Committee (9 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander members including 2 Elders)

  • An advisory committee to the USC School of Education established as part of the implementation of USC More Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Teachers Initiative (MATSITI) goals.

 Buranga Indigenous Student Committee (2 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Co-Chairs)

  • A student group, founded in 2006 representing the voice and interests of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students at USC Sippy Downs.

 Head of Indigenous Services (1 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Head of Service)

The Head of Indigenous Services a direct report of the Pro Vice-Chancellor (Students) and a key member of the PVC(S) Portfolio Leadership Team. The Head is responsible for supervising and developing services that improve the education outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and the provision of cultural advice and expertise to the University.

2. Increase the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people employed as academic and non-academic staff in higher education institutions.

The University’s current Indigenous Employment and Career Development Strategy was developed in 2010 and describes USC’s commitment to increasing the recruitment, development and support of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in academic and professional roles in higher education. The Strategy was informed through community and staff consultation. It reflects the employment priority areas identified by the indigenous Higher Education Advisory Council. Human Resources is responsible primarily for the implementation of the Indigenous Employment and Career Development Strategy. In addition, Faculty and Cost Centre Managers work with Human Resources to ensure that the indicators of the Indigenous Employment and Career Development Strategy are achieved. The Indigenous Employment and Career Development Strategy is publicly accessible on the USC website at www.usc.edu.au/iecds. The key objectives of the IECDS are:

  • To build upon the successes of the earlier “Employment and Participation Strategy for Indigenous Australians at USC”
  • To reflect the employment priority areas identified by the Indigenous Higher Education Advisory Council (IHEAC)
  • To ensure a work environment where respect for cultural, social and spiritual systems practised by Indigenous Australians enriches the activities of USC
  • To foster a culturally diverse workforce that is reflective of Australian society
  • To be recognised as an employer of choice by Indigenous Australians
  • To contribute to reconciliation with Indigenous Australians and communities.

Supporting potential Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff through the University is a priority area under the Indigenous Employment and Career Development Strategy (Objective 1 Implement culturally effective initiatives to increase the number of Indigenous people employed at USC) to ensure that potential staff are recruited. The actions under this Strategy include the following:

  • 1.1 Ensure all USC vacancies are circulated to Indigenous community networks and employment officers
  • 1.2 Develop career services that enhance the employment outcomes of Indigenous graduands, including work experience and internship opportunities at USC
  • 1.3 Promote USC’s commitment as an EEO employer to prospective employees, particularly Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • 1.4 Ensure selection panel members have demonstrated knowledge and understanding of Indigenous Australian societies and culture
  • 1.5 Ensure support mechanisms are in place for Indigenous staff and their supervisors (eg cultural awareness training, mentoring and orientation programs)
  • 1.6 Provide flexible employment arrangements to allow Indigenous staff to meet cultural responsibilities

Supporting current Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff in the University is also a priority area under the Indigenous Employment and Career Development Strategy (Objective 2 Support Indigenous staff to pursue and achieve their professional goals and potential) to ensure that potential staff are retained and participated in professional development. The actions under this Strategy include the following:

  • 1 Training needs of Indigenous staff are identified in their Professional Performance Review meetings
  • 2 Peer mentoring of Indigenous early career researchers
  • 3 Increased scholarship opportunities for Indigenous postgraduate students
  • 4 Targeted promotion of the study and research assistance schemes available to Indigenous Australian staff
  • 5 Expansion of staff skills and experience through professional development, job rotation and secondment opportunities
  • 6 Establish an Indigenous employee support network

The USC Indigenous Employment and Career Development Strategy is currently undergoing review and renewal with a new Strategy expected to be released in 2017. This will include renewed measures of success and timeframes.

 

In 2014 there were 8 Indigenous-specific positions at the University of the Sunshine Coast, in 2015 there were 9 positions:

  • 1x Head, Indigenous Services
  • 1x Community Liaison Officer, Indigenous Services
  • 2x Student Adviser, Indigenous Services
  • 1x Administrative Assistant, Indigenous Services
  • 1x Indigenous Early Career Academic
  • 1x Indigenous Early Career Professional Staff
  • 2x Indigenous Cadets

 

Current number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Staff (35 in 2015)

Table 1 – Permanent Positions

Faculty/Institute/Section

Academic/Professional Staff

Number

Faculty of Arts, Business & Law

Academic

1

Faculty of Science, Health,
Education & Engineering

Academic

2

Professional Staff

1

Indigenous Services

Professional Staff

3

Student Services & Engagement

Professional Staff

1

Student Wellbeing

Professional Staff

1

Human Resources

Professional Staff

1

Total

 

10

Table 2 – Fixed-term and Casual Positions

Faculty/Institute/Section

Academic/Professional Staff

Number

Faculty of Arts, Business & Law

Academic

7

Professional Staff

1

Faculty of Science, Health,
Education & Engineering

Academic Staff

4

Professional Staff

1

Indigenous Services

Professional Staff

10

Strategic Information & Analysis Unit

Professional Staff

1

Student Wellbeing

Professional Staff

1

Total

 

25

 

 

 
3. Ensure equitable access of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to higher education.

 

Indigenous Services enhances the health, education and employment aspirations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and community through offering a culturally safe space to explore identity and knowledge. Indigenous Services implement various student empowerment and community engagement initiatives to build self-belief and promote a strong sense of belonging. In building the capacity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, we focus on enhancing the strength and resilience of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through a framework built on respect for individuals and their communities.

Indigenous Services helps to achieve this by:

  • developing and implementing the whole of University's approach to reconciliation 
  • developing support programs and student facilities for students
  • developing strategies to employ more Indigenous staff across University
  • organising cultural activities and events within University
  • providing academic assistance to students
  • providing a culturally safe Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander presence on campus and a contact point for students, staff and community members
  • providing the University with information about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, culture and knowledge
  • providing study equipment such as laptops and textbooks other resources for loan by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students
  • supporting career choices and assisting with employment options
  • delivering cultural awareness workshops for staff and students

 

Commencing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

 

2014

2015

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

111 (2.6%)

98 (2.2%)

Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students (Domestic students only):

4213

4360

 

Source: Department of Education -  from HEIMS Online Data Verification Enrolment Summary Report – Citizenship and Indigenous

 

Programs to improve access

 

Program Name

Target audience

Outline of Program

Outcome

Indigenous Direct Entry and Access Scheme (IDEAS)

All Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander prospective students

All applicants identifying as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander are invited to participate in IDEAS. Panel interview and assessment of applicants’ skills, experience and aspirations, may lead to offer of admission into a degree program or guide applicants to consider TPP as a preparatory program.

In 2015, over 50 formal IDEAS interviews took place which resulted in 30 enrolments to USC

Tertiary Preparation Program

All Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander prospective students

Prospective undergraduate students experience university life before committing to a degree program. Students undertaking TPP are provided with access to the same services and facilities offered to all Indigenous students, including additional tutoring.

45 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student were enrolled in TPP in 2015

Headstart entry

High school students in Years 11 and 12

Prospective visiting students experience university life before leaving high school. Academic credit is awarded towards USC degrees, and students gain entry into many USC degrees with successful completion of two courses.

3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student completed Headstart in 2015.

Targeted scholarship opportunities

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students including those enrolled in the Headstart program

http://www.usc.edu.au/learn/what-will-i-pay/scholarships/indigenous-and-australian-south-sea-islander-students

88 Scholarships / bursaries were awarded in 2015

 

 

Outreach activities

 

Outreach activity

Target audience

Outline of Program

Outcome

Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience (AIME)

High School students in Years 9 to 12

Engaging schools from Redcliffe to Gympie. Indigenous high school students are mentored/tutored by USC students, with the goal of increasing school retention and Year 12 completions.

 

11 schools engaged with 51 Mentors. 133 students were engaged with 126 student progressing. 93.8 % of Year 8 to 9 progressions and 100 % of Year 9 to 10 progressions. 2 students progressing to university.

Murri Pathways

High school students and their families

Collaborative touring presentation promoting post-school options including traineeships and apprenticeships, certificate and diploma courses, defence jobs, sports and health careers, the Headstart program, TPP and undergraduate courses.

Annual increase in school leaver enrolments

Participation in community events to promote aspirations

Prospective students

Booin Gari

North Coast Aboriginal Corporation for Community Health “Well Person’s Health Check Days”

NAIDOC Cotton Tree

NAIDOC Gympie

USC Open Day

Annual increase in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander school leaver enrolments

Participate in community groups

Prospective adult learners and service providers

Sunshine Coast Indigenous Network Group

Mungalla Forum

Annual increase in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander school leaver enrolments

 

 

Scholarships details

Scholarship details

Government/ Private/University

No. Allocated

Cost ($)

No. Awarded

Comments

Indigenous Access

Government

27

$120,575

25

 

Indigenous CAS

Government

17

$73,761

16

ICAS + IECAS

Indigenous CECS

Government

79

$160,209

63

32 New + 63 Cont allocated less returned 16 [6(F/T) + 10 (P/T)]

Indigenous Enabling CECS

Government

6

$5,086

4

 

Headstart – Indigenous

University

 

$800

2

$400 one-off payment

Jaralema Scholarship

Private

 

$3,500

2

1 new, 1 legacy award paid

Rotary Scholarship

Private

 

$7,500

2

1 x student funded S1 & S2 and S1 only

Indigenous Honours / Postgraduate

University (HEPP)

 

$1,228

1

Cash payment plus tuition fee waiver

Equity Bursaries

University (HEPP)

 

$7,000

7

3 x S1 and 4 x S2

Total

 

129

$359,631

122

 

 
4. Achieve the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in higher education, at rates commensurate with those of all other Australians.

Indigenous Services builds partnerships with other organisations and community groups to ensure that all students have a better understanding of their place in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and Community at the end of primary school have a strong cultural self-belief by the end of secondary school. Best practice engagement with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is strengthened through embedded research that focus on innovative capacity building.

 

The total number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student
enrolments for 2014 and 2015 is as follows:

 

 

2014

2015

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students:

209

227

Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students (Domestic students only):

9 350

10 243

Source: Department of Education -  from HEIMS Online Data Verification Enrolment Summary Report – Citizenship and Indigenous

 

Strategies to address participation

Strategies

Outline of strategies

Constraints

Outcome

Indigenous Orientation Program

Includes academic skills workshops, campus tours and introduction to staff. This enables a culturally appropriate transition to university.

The Indigenous Orientation is held in face-to-face mode during Orientation week which can limit attendance.

The access ratio for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students at USC was 2.2% in 2015 which was higher than the national average (1.8%)

Culturally safe work space

In 2015, USC provided a dedicated culturally safe space for students to work and gather in the Buranga Centre (USC Sippy Downs). This includes access to computer workstations, textbook library and private meeting rooms. Through the Buranga Centre, students can hire laptops and other work material. The space also includes a common room where students can meet socially.

USC are currently looking at ways in which we can offer culturally safe spaces for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students at our other campuses and learning hubs.

The participation rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students at USC was 2.2% in 2015 which was higher than the Queensland (2.1%) and Australian (1.5%) average.

Regular student social event

Events such as morning teas with Elders are implemented for students to engage with community members. This encourages ongoing social, emotional and cultural engagement of students.

Capacity of Elders and community members to commit to social events can be difficult. Significant time must be spent transport community members to events can hinder the success of events.

The success ratio for USC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander success ratio was 0.86 in 2014 which was higher than the National level of 0.84 level. The success ratio for non-indigenous students at USC is 86.3%

Indigenous Tutorial Assistance Scheme

The USC Program focuses on academic skills development and is funded through the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet. This service is offered across all USC campuses and learning hubs.

Sourcing appropriate tutors that are both competent with content and culturally competent can constrain the uptake of the program.

In Semester 1, 2015 there were 71 students participating in ITAS. In Semester 2 there were 54 students and 8 students in Session 8 (Summer). 84 % of ITAS students achieved a pass or higher grade. In comparison, just 73 % of students with courses that where not tutored under ITAS achieved a pass grade or higher. Importantly, students who had courses tutored under the ITAS program where more likely to achieve a high distinction, distinction or credit grade. Student achieving an HD were 10% with ITAS compared to 7% without. Student achieving a DN were 28% compared to 19% without. Credit was 26% with ITAS compared to 23% without and PS 19% compared to 23% without. .

Cadetships

Promoting workplace learning opportunities and experience available through the Indigenous Cadetship Support program.

Sourcing cadetships opportunities in the field of study can restrict the uptake of this program.

Over 37 cadets have been placed with employers since 2010. 17 of those were employed as a cadet at USC. Three students were employed as a cadet with USC in 2015. One of these student graduating at the end of 2015 and was employed on a contract with the Faculty of Arts, Business and Law.

Promoting wellness

Indigenous Services staff are Referrers with the North Coast Aboriginal Cooperation for Community Health (NCACCH). NCACCH provides health services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community members in the Sunshine Coast and Gympie regions.

Referrers are required to regularly attend professional development in order to maintain accreditation.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students, staff and community members are able to access the Buranga Centre for health referrals. Over 70 referrals were conducted in 2015.

Preventative health

The Buranga Centre hosted a Flu Vaccination program to promote health and prevent illness in a culturally safe environment.

The program requires students to attend the Buranga Centre in order to receive the Flu Vaccination.

A drop-in service was held in 2015 for 4 hours on 12 May.

 

 

 
5. Enable Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to attain the same graduation rates from award courses in higher education as other Australians.

Indigenous Services design and implement novel projects through inspired reflection, raising challenging questions and confronting issues associated with educational engagement and self-belief. To make sense of complex graduation rates, Indigenous Services devise, adopt and adapt methods and technologies to create new knowledge that improves our understanding of student experience and aspirations. Indigenous Services then aims to communicate these insights widely which offer individuals and communities new opportunities, ideas and possibilities for enacting change.

 

 

2014

2015

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Higher Degree)

0

0

Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Higher Degree)

15

18

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Other postgraduate)

3

4

Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Other postgraduate)

239

380

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Bachelor degree)

19

21

Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students: (Bachelor degree)

1105

1258

 

Source: Department of Education - from HEIMS Online Data Verification Award Course Completions

 

Support mechanisms

Description

Constraints

Outcome

Academic and personal assistance

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student have access to dedicated Student Adviser to assist with Confirmation of Aboriginality, enrolment enquiries and program advice. In addition, students have access to academic skills guidance, financial assistance, accommodation support and health and wellbeing counselling through specific services.

Student tend to prefer face-to-face consultations. A broader range of consultation methods is currently being explored such as web-based.

Student Advisers resolved over 200 cases of students needing assistance in 2015.

Celebration of success

USC host Graduation Celebration for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students graduating from a degree program. Students and their families attend along with executive staff, academics and professional staff.

The limited availability of graduates to attend the Graduation Celebration mean that the event is often smaller in size than the number of graduands participating in the formal graduation ceremony.

16 Undergraduate degrees conferred in 2015 with 3 Postgraduate degrees conferred.

Symposium to promote engagement

The Indigenous Education Symposium was hosted and involved student receiving free registration. Keynote Speakers were among the most respected Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander academics in their respective field.

Scheduling the Symposium appropriately around the academic calendar in order to promote socialisation and engagement of student.

162 people attended the Indigenous Education Symposium in 2015.

Graduate connectedness

Indigenous Services’ Facebook page was established in 2013 for students and Alumni to connect, share information and promote events. The Facebook page also acts a resources for employment advertisements and scholarship activities.

Relies on graduates seeking to connect to Indigenous Services. More active ways of staying connected to Alumni are being explored.

The Indigenous Services’ Facebook has over 500 friends which consists of current students and Alumni.

Inclusive learning experience

USC has one of the highest proportions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students of all the Australian Universities. Inclusive learning environments, culturally safe spaces and flexible multi-modal teaching and learning strategies are key to USC’s student engagement.

Limited or unorganised nature of embedding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives and knowledges in the curriculum.

88.2% of students report that USC present a high quality educational experience

 

Source: Quality Indicators for Learning and Teaching – Experience Survey 2014 and Student Experience Survey 2015

 
6. To provide all Australian students with an understanding of and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander traditional and contemporary cultures.

The USC Top Level Plan 2 – “Deliver high quality teaching, learning and graduate outcomes”, includes embedding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives and knowledge in curriculum design, as a key strategy. A USC-wide Framework and 5-year Action Plan is currently being designed to provide all students with the opportunity to encounter and engage with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledges and perspectives through their course of Study. :

 

Specific courses in TPP, undergraduate and postgraduate offerings that reflect Indigenous perspectives include:

  • TPP106 An Introduction to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Societies
  • EDU316 Teaching History and Geography in the Primary School
  • EDU332 Investigating the World Around Us
  • EDU 403 Children’s Literature and Literacy
  • EDU410 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Perspectives in Learning and Teaching
  • EDU413 Teaching the Australian Curriculum: Languages
  • EDU414 Teaching Arts in Primary Schools
  • EGL206 Reading Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Writing
  • GEO310 Indigenous Peoples and the Environment
  • GEO700 Indigenous Peoples and Sustainability
  • HLT150 Indigenous Health Perspectives
  • LAW315 Indigenous Legal Issues
  • NUR332 Cultural Diversity in Nursing and Midwifery
  • NUT352 Contemporary Issues in Nutrition
  • PUB112 Public Health Foundations (Associate Degree in Science, Bachelor of Health Science, Bachelor of Nutrition, Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics, Bachelor of Occupational Therapy (Honours), and Bachelor of Paramedic Science)
  • PUB707 Public Health Foundations (Graduate Diploma in Health Promotion and Master of Health Promotion)
  • PSY302 Intercultural and Indigenous Psychologies
  • SCS130 Introduction to Indigenous Australia
  • SCS203 Introduction to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education
  • SCS210 Indigenous Australia and the State
  • SCS251 Working Effectively with Aboriginal People
  • SCS701 Engaging Effectively with Aboriginal People

 Programs that have specific Indigenous content include:

  • Tertiary Preparation Pathway
  • Associate Degree in Science
  • Graduate Diploma in Health Promotion
  • Bachelor of Criminology and Justice
  • Bachelor of Environmental Science
  • Bachelor of Education
  • Bachelor of Health Promotion
  • Bachelor of Health Science – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Major
  • Bachelor of Laws
  • Bachelor Nursing Science
  • Bachelor of Nutrition
  • Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Bachelor of Occupational Therapy (Honours)
  • Bachelor of Paramedic Science
  • Bachelor of Social Work
  • Bachelor of Sport and Exercise Science
  • Master of Health Promotion

 In addressing the cultural competency of its staff and students, the University provides co-curricular activities that raise awareness of Indigenous knowledge and culture including:

  • cultural training workshops delivered each semester
  • staff development workshops on inclusive teaching practice
  • the annual USC Indigenous Education Symposia, which aim to facilitate understandings between educators, students, and Indigenous Australians
  • cultural awareness training provided for ITAS tutors
  • introduction of Equity and Diversity Awards (2015) to encourage and recognise outstanding initiatives and achievements that support USC’s equity and diversity objectives
  • ecological knowledge tours of the USC campus, increasing awareness and appreciation of Indigenous issues and culture
  • connecting students to the experience, inspiration and vision of important members of the local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community
  • events recognising cultural days of significance are held on campus and in the community

 

Community members are included in formal and ceremonial University occasions, with traditional custodians providing official Welcome to Country during the opening of every USC Graduation Ceremony. Protocols for acknowledging the traditional custodians of the land, and inviting community members to provide a Welcome to Country, are published on the USC website.

 The Student Adviser, the ITAS Coordinator and the Head of Indigenous Services designed the cultural training workshops and the staff development workshops on inclusive teaching practice that were run for the academic tutors. These positions have also been actively involved with forging and strengthening community relationships in 2015.

 Indigenous Services holds a broad role in promoting cultural competency on campus, and respectful partnerships with communities. Indigenous Services staff are invited to deliver guest lectures into courses. They are consulted on learning and teaching projects and research ethics approval applications with Indigenous content. The expanded Buranga Centre facility (opened 2014) includes an adjoining cultural public gathering place, designed through consultation with the Vice-Chancellor’s Indigenous Advisory Committee. This community place is an interpretation of the traditional Gubbi Gubbi/Kabi Kabi yarning circle (Nga Tana Lui Dhar), and includes areas representing the elements of earth, air, water and fire. It provides a prominent place to promote cross-cultural understandings and advance knowledge about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander societies, values and traditions. The Centre is a supportive inspirational environment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to explore learning, leadership and planning for the future.

Section 2 Expenditure of Indigenous Support Program Grant

Acquittal Summary Details (excluding GST)

 

INCOME

1. Unexpended Indigenous Support Programme funds from 2014 which were committed for expenditure prior to 31/12/2014.

$0

(+) 2. Unexpended and uncommitted Indigenous Support Programme funds from 2013 which were approved for expenditure in 2015.

$62 335

(+) 3. Indigenous Support Programme funds provided in 2015. These amounts appear on Recipient Created Tax Invoices (RCTIs) or Payment Advice Letters.

$411 665

(+) 4. Interest, royalties and other income derived from Indigenous Support Programme funds in 2015.

$0

(=) 5. Total Indigenous Support Programme funds to be acquitted in 2015.

$474 000

 

EXPENDITURE

6. Total Indigenous Support Programme expenditure in 2015, excluding any GST.

$ 474000

(+) 7. Unexpended Indigenous Support Programme funds which were committed for expenditure prior to 31/12/2015.

$0

(+) 8. Requested carryover into 2014 of unexpended Indigenous Support Programme funds which were not committed for expenditure by 31/12/2015 – written approval date /…/2015.1

$0

(=)  9. Total Indigenous Support Programme funds which by 31/12/2015 were fully expended and/or committed for expenditure.

$474 000

10. Returns of 2015Indigenous Support Program Funds by 31/12/2015.

$

11. Balance of Funds for 2015 (Unexpended/uncommitted Indigenous Support Programme funds to be returned or recovered from 2014 entitlements).

$0

 

 

12. Balance of provider’s Indigenous Support Programme bank account or cost centre as at 31/12/2015.

$0


Section 3 Higher Education provider's contact information

University Officer

Dr Keane Wheeler, Head of Indigenous Services 
Phone: + 61 7 5459 4439
Email: kwheeler@usc.edu.au

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