GeneCology Research Centre Honours projects

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GeneCology Research Centre Honours projects

Breadcrumbs

The GeneCology Research Centre is housed in the Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering and forms an umbrella for research in the areas of Genetics, Ecology, Genomics and Physiology within terrestrial and marine environments, and the interaction between these. The Group studies individual species’ biology and ecology, ecological communities and habitats, as well production systems and their environment. Research covers a range of topics including:

  • sustainable production systems in aquaculture, forestry and horticulture
  • reproductive biology and physiology of plants and animals
  • genetics and genomics of commercially important traits in aquaculture, forestry and horticulture
  • evolution and function of mitochondrial genomes
  • environmental and medical microbiology enzymology, virology, parasitology
  • molecular biology, molecular biotechnology and molecular engineering
  • organic and carbohydrate chemistry biochemistry, biomineralisation
  • plant biotechnology, micropropagation, forest entomology
  • conservation genetics of threatened species and restoration genetics
  • integration of population ecology and genetics for threatened species recovery and restoration, translocation habitat and population modelling
  • effects of climate change on species distributions, reproduction, population growth and genetics
  • biodiversity of ecological communities including the integration of genetics and community ecology, restoration and conservation management and planning
  • ecotoxicology and bioinformatics
  • microbial communities, their roles and mechanism of action in biomedical and agricultural contexts
  • engineering of molecular devices for therapeutic and diagnostic use
  • biodiscovery, the search for novel compounds
  • aquaculture biotechnology, aquaculture genetics
 Title Primary supervisor

Conservation genetics of the commercially significant Queensland species, Santalum lanceolatum.

Queensland sandalwood (Santalum lanceolatum R.Br.) has been commercially harvested since 1860. In the Cape York Peninsula (CYP), there was a major industry exporting sandalwood timber to China, however, this industry collapsed around 1940. The remaining trees occur in isolated stands, which are likely to comprise families or clones from root coppice and hence have limited genetic diversity. These isolated stands and are under threat from fire and grazing. This project will determine the genetic diversity and structure of this species in the CYP with the aim of developing an appropriate conservation and domestication program for the species.

In this project you will utilise microsatellite DNA markers and population genetics technology to assess the genetic diversity and structure of CYP Santalum lanceolatum. By undertaking this approach, the successful candidate will develop a broad technical skills base in molecular biology and genetics. The successful candidate will also have an opportunity to participate in field research to collect some of the Santalum lanceolatum material in the CYP.

Start date: Semester 1 or Semester 2, 2017 

Dr Steven Ogbourne 

Email:steven.ogbourne@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5188 

Associate Professor David Lee

Email: dlee@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5759

 

Reducing the extinction risk of Alectryon ramiflorus.

Alectryon ramiflorus is locally known as the Isis tamarind and belongs to the family Sapindaceae. It is listed as endangered under the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 and is known from one main population of less than 50 plants in the Cordalba Forest Reserve. A. ramiflorus is threatened by a combination of extremely low population size, low rates of natural regeneration, restricted habitat availability and a variety of potential environmental factors including fire, drought, grazing and weed invasion. Some populations are further threatened as they occur on land not specifically reserved for protection of biodiversity. The Queensland Government have issued a Recovery Plan for A. ramiflorus and one objective highlighted is to undertake research into the genetic diversity of the species. This project will complete this activity as part of a larger project that aims to reduce the extinction risk of this nationally endangered tree species.

In this project you will develop and utilise microsatellite DNA markers to assess the genetic diversity and population genetic structure of A. ramiflorus. By undertaking this research, the successful candidate will develop a broad technical skills base in molecular biology and conservation genetics. The successful candidate will also have an opportunity to undertake field work to collect samples for analysis.

Start date: Semester 1 or Semester 2, 2017

Dr Steven Ogbourne & Gabriel Conroy

Email:steven.ogbourne@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5188 

 

Closing the gaps in crustacean sex determination and differentiation

Characterization of novel targets for molt and reproduction manipulation in crustaceans

Elucidating the spiny lobster metamorphosis pathways

Crustacean aquaculture is one of the fastest growing food sectors. With the increase in industry volume more sophisticated technologies are required to enhance the sector’s rapid growth and promote its sustainability. Integration of molecular and biochemical techniques together with large dataset bioinformatics analyses enable us to clarify long standing open questions in crustacean reproduction and development. Through collaboration with UTas and using model organisms kept at the USC aquaculture facility, we work towards understanding key mechanisms which govern these important processes. 

Dr Tomer Ventura

Email: tventura@usc.edu.auTel: +61 7 5456 5984 | 0457 892 999

 

Conservation genetics of the commercially significant Queensland species, Santalum lanceolatum.

Queensland sandalwood (Santalum lanceolatum R.Br.) has been commercially harvested since 1860. In the Cape York Peninsula (CYP), there was a major industry exporting sandalwood timber to China, however, this industry collapsed around 1940. The remaining trees occur in isolated stands, which are likely to comprise families or clones from root coppice and hence have limited genetic diversity. These isolated stands and are under threat from fire and grazing. This project will determine the genetic diversity and structure of this species in the CYP with the aim of developing an appropriate conservation and domestication program for the species.

In this project you will utilise microsatellite DNA markers and population genetics technology to assess the genetic diversity and structure of CYP Santalum lanceolatum. By undertaking this approach, the successful candidate will develop a broad technical skills base in molecular biology and genetics. The successful candidate will also have an opportunity to participate in field research to collect some of the Santalum lanceolatum material in the CYP.

Start Date: Semester 1 or Semester 2 2017

Dr Steven Ogbourne 

Email: steven.ogbourne@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5188

Reducing the extinction risk of Alectryon ramiflorus.

Alectryon ramiflorus is locally known as the Isis tamarind and belongs to the family Sapindaceae. It is listed as endangered under the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 and is known from one main population of less than 50 plants in the Cordalba Forest Reserve. A. ramiflorus is threatened by a combination of extremely low population size, low rates of natural regeneration, restricted habitat availability and a variety of potential environmental factors including fire, drought, grazing and weed invasion. Some populations are further threatened as they occur on land not specifically reserved for protection of biodiversity. The Queensland Government have issued a Recovery Plan for A. ramiflorus and one objective highlighted is to undertake research into the genetic diversity of the species. This project will complete this activity as part of a larger project that aims to reduce the extinction risk of this nationally endangered tree species.

In this project you will develop and utilise microsatellite DNA markers to assess the genetic diversity and population genetic structure of A. ramiflorus. By undertaking this research, the successful candidate will develop a broad technical skills base in molecular biology and conservation genetics. The successful candidate will also have an opportunity to undertake field work to collect samples for analysis.

Start Date: Semester 1 or Semester 2 2017

Dr Steven Ogbourne & Gabriel Conroy

Email: steven.ogbourne@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5188

A population genetic analysis of Fraser Island dingoes.

Fraser Island's iconic dingo population is commonly reported to be one of the last remaining reservoirs of genetic purity. Despite this perception, little genetic research on the population has taken place to date. This project will provide baseline population genetic information for the island's dingo population.

Dr Gabriel Conroy

Email: gconroy@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 4803

DNA-Mark-Recapture-Analysis of the Fraser Island Dingo Population

This project runs as part of a pilot study to estimate the size of the iconic Fraser Island dingo population. The project would involve some fieldwork to Fraser Island, as well as some molecular lab-work. Full training can be provided for the latter so prospective students without a strong lab/molecular background should still contact the project supervisors.

Dr Gabriel Conroy and Dr Steven Ogbourne

Email: gconroy@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 4803

Little is known about the role that sexual selection plays on the evolution of sociality. To address this gap, my research group uses the eastern water dragon to better understand how variation in mating behaviour of males influences their social environment.

The population we study is based at the Roma Street Parkland in Brisbane where we have been following the dragons for the last four years. This project will combine behaviour, ecology and genetics to investigate whether differences in male mating strategies leads to differences in their social environment. The student will be expected to undertake field and laboratory work.

Dr Celine Frere

Email: cfrere@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5415

Eastern water dragons are 'urban-adapter' and can be found in high abundance within our cities. This project will investigate whether eastern water dragons are changing their diet to life in the city. To do so, we will use isotope analysis to measure diet differences between urban and non-urban populations of eastern water dragons across Southeast Queensland.

This project will involve heavy field and laboratory work.

Dr Celine Frere

Email: cfrere@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5415

Eastern water dragons can be found in contrasting environments (eg. urban vs non-urban and fresh vs saltwater habitats). This project will investigate the genetic differences between these environments using the Nd5 subunit mitochondrial DNA. This project will contain heavy fieldwork and molecular laboratory work.

Dr Celine Frere

Email: cfrere@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5415

Aquaculture biotechnology

In this project you will work on a commercially important species in the context of a larger, well funded research environment, and get an understanding of what are the real issues for the aquaculture industry and what solutions we can offer them using biotechnology and bioinformatics.

Research activities: From investigating hormones, hormone delivery systems and the effects of hormones on pubertal development, spawning and other traits in a range of aquaculture species to creating surrogates in fish, and looking at bioinformatics, gene expression and genome structure in the Australian and international aquaculture scene

Required skills and experience: To work on this project you must have: a passion for knowledge, and ideally some background in aquaculture, molecular biology and biotechnology. If you are still keen but didn’t study these areas- its OK! We can train you.

Start Date: Semester 2, 2016 or Semester 1, 2017

Prof Abigail Elizur, Dr Tomer Ventura, Dr Scott Cummins, Dr Josephine Nocillado, Daniel Powell

Email: AElizur@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5459 4813

Ready to put away your butterfly collecting net?

Want to work with big business in the commercial space?

Want to see your research have real commercial application and outcomes?

If so a career in “commercial” science may be for you.

The aquaculture genetics breeding group USC has projects for over 12 different species nationally and around the world, including lobsters, prawns, kingfish, pearls, oysters, grouper. We are pioneering very advanced genetic and molecular methods to predict future breeding values of animals using their DNA.

Are you ready for a career in science and industry?

Start Date: Semester 2, 2016 or Semester 1, 2017

Associate Professor Wayne Knibb

Email: wknibb@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5430 2831

 

Pedigree barramundi: Barramundi is an iconic species for QLD and Australia. Farmers are now reproducing it in captivity. The problem is that they need to identify in the captive bred generations which animals are unrelated, so they in turn can be bred. DNA forensic tools will be used to reconstruct a full barramundi pedigree for a farm, and so help the farm generate unrelated F2 and F3.

Associate Professor Wayne Knibb

Email: wknibb@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5430 2831

How do prawns (shrimp) resist viruses? Shrimp aquaculture has become one of the most valuable fisheries in the world, but regularly suffers catastrophic losses from viral diseases.

The Hons project will analyze over 1000 prawns from more than 30 different  prawn families to see if a virus (HPV) measured by real time PCR is different among the families, and to what degree these differences are genetic. Some bioinformatic analysis of transcriptomes may support this work. This work is expected to be of international significance.

Associate Professor Wayne Knibb

Email: wknibb@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5430 2831

Molecular epidemiology of chlamydial infections in Australian beef cattle.

While Chlamydia pecorum infections are most commonly recognised as the major cause of disease in koalas, this bacteria is also a significant cause of disease in Australian livestock. In cattle, C. pecorum causes debilitating central nervous system infections which result in rapid weight loss and death to animals and economic loss to graziers.

Previous molecular typing studies by our group have shown that C. pecorum has a complex epidemiology in Australian sheep and cattle, including evidence for mixed infections of different strains circulating within a single flock or herd and even within a single animal. In sheep, we have also shown that certain C. pecorum strains are more likely to cause disease than others, providing opportunities to develop more effective diagnostic tests for veterinarians but also giving us good targets for the development of a chlamydial vaccine for livestock.

Using a range of samples collected from our veterinary partners in the NSW Department of Primary Industries, the Honours student in this project will employ a well-established multi-locus sequence typing scheme for C. pecorum to answer key questions over (i) the transmission and shedding of C. pecorum in beef cattle; and (ii) the relationship between different C. pecorum strains and the range of diseases reported in Australian beef cattle.

Associate Professor Adam Polkinghorne

Email: apolking@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5578

Immunological profiling of the mucosal response to chlamydial infections and vaccination in koalas.

Chlamydia pecorum is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen and the major cause of infectious disease in the koala. A key factor in the development of chlamydial disease in the koala but also other hosts is the immune response to infection, with a careful balance of humoral and cell-mediated immunity expected to the make the difference between successful clearance of the bacteria or the development of debilitating immune-mediated disease. A careful understanding of this process is important for not only understanding how disease progresses in the koala but it also underpins our ongoing development of a prototype koala chlamydial vaccine.

To date, our attempts to measure immunity at the site of infection (ie. the ocular and genital tract mucosa) have been limited by the absence of immunological reagents for the koala. With the recent completion of the koala transcriptome, we have now developed a toolkit of serological and molecular assays with which we can begin to apply to this host.

Using samples provided to us from partners at Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital but also from our ongoing field trials of a koala vaccine, this Honours project will involve the use of a range of qPCR and ELISA-based assays to measure the differences in key humoral and cell-mediated immune markers in koalas presenting with different stages of chlamydial disease.

Associate Professor Adam Polkinghorne

Email: apolking@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5578

Comparative genomics of koala Chlamydia pecorum infections in South Australian koalas.

Chlamydia pecorum is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen and the major cause of infectious disease in the koala. To understand the origin, evolution and ability of this bacteria to cause disease, our group has been using culture-independent genome sequencing to compare the genomes of C. pecorum strains detected in koalas from all Australian states as well as C. pecorum strains from Australian livestock. Recent work by our team has revealed that South Australian koala C. pecorum strains appear to be genetically distinct from strains in other Australian states. Anecdotal evidence also suggests that chlamydial infections in South Australian koalas do not lead to the debilitating disease outcomes seen in Queensland koala populations.

Using samples provided to us from wildlife hospitals and zoos in South Australia, this Honours project will involve comparative genomics analysis of koala C. pecorum strains isolated from throughout the koala's host range in South Australia. The Honours student involved in this project will learn to assemble, annotate and analyse bacterial genomes and will utilise these skills to address key questions over the genetic differences between C. pecorum infections in northern and southern koala populations.

Associate Professor Adam Polkinghorne

Email: apolking@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5578

Characterization of the mitochondrial genome of the common wombat scabies mite

Sarcoptic mange is a severe skin disease in common wombats caused by scabies mite, Sarcoptes scabiei. Introduced canines, such as fox and feral dogs, may initially bring the scabies to the  wombats. The exact origin of the scabies in wombats, however, remains unknown. This project aims to sequence and characterize the mitochondrial genome of the scabies mites that cause sarcoptic mange in common wombats in Tasmania. You will also conduct comparative genomics studies to explore the origin of scabies in wombats.

Dr Renfu Shao

Email: rshao@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5469

In vitro culturing of cells of the human head lice

In vitro culturing of cells is a powerful tool for in-depth studies of eukaryotes. Many cell lines have been developed but none is from the insect order Phthiraptera, i.e. the parasitic lice of birds and mammals. Human head lice (Pediculus capitis) are blood-sucking parasites that infest school children in Australia and worldwide. Head lice cause severe itching and disturb students from normal life and study. Due to insecticide resistance, head lice are getting harder to control. Unlike other animals, head lice have extensively fragmented mitochondrial genomes, which made them an ideal model for studying the evolution of mitochondrial genomes. This project aims to establish a cell line from human head lice. The cell line will provide a valuable resource for developing novel insecticides to control head lice. This cell line will be the first ever that has fragmented mitochondrial genomes and will allow investigation into the phenomenon of mitochondrial genome fragmentation at cellular levels.

Dr Renfu Shao

Email: rshao@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5469

Blood-sucking lice of Australian native mammals: diversity, taxonomy and systematics

Blood-sucking lice (suborder Anoplura) parasitize eutherian mammals including humans, and are of medical and veterinary significance as parasites and vectors of infectious disease agents. Australia has 56 species of extant native rodents, all in the family Muridae, which were diversified in the past 4 million years. Globally, ~400 of the 700 ( i.e. 57%) known species in the family Muridae are hosts to blood-sucking lice. In Australia, however, only 7 of the 56 (i.e. 12.5%) native species in this family were known to host blood-sucking lice. This project aims to reveal the hidden diversity of Australian native sucking lice. You will collect rodents in field. You will also examine sucking lice samples in laboratory with both morphological and molecular methods to address taxonomic and systematic issues pertinent to Australian sucking lice.

Dr Renfu Shao

Email: rshao@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5469

Understanding mitochondrial genome re-organization in thrips

Thrips (order Thysanoptera) are small insects that feed on a diverse range of plants and animals. There are over 5,000 species of thrips; many of them are considered pests. Three species of thrips have been sequenced for mitochondrial genomes – all are highly rearranged in gene order relative to other insects. This project aims to reveal the diversity and variation of mitochondrial genome organization in the thrips. You will sequence the mitochondrial genomes of thrips species from different major lineages. You will also conduct comparative studies to characterize novel mitochondrial genome organization and explore how mitochondrial genomes evolved in thrips.

Dr Renfu Shao

Email: rshao@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5469

Mitochondrial genome fragmentation in the chewing lice of eutherian mammals

Both sucking lice (suborder Anoplura) and chewing lice (suborder Rhyncophthirina; family Trichodectidae of the suborder Ischnocera) parasitize eutherian mammals. Fragmentation of mitochondrial genomes has been found in all of the species of sucking lice and the chewing lice in the suborder Rhyncophthirina that have been investigated. This project aims to discover whether or not fragmentation of mitochondrial genome occurred in the chewing lice of the family Trichodectidae of the suborder Ischnocera. Genome fragmentation is a drastic evolutionary phenomenon. Determining the phylogenetic boundary of mitochondrial genome fragmentation will shed new insight into the high-level phylogeny of the parasitic lice (order Phthiraptera).

Dr Renfu Shao

Email: rshao@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5469

Supervisor

Areas

Dr Lesley Brooker

Email: lbrooker@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5430 1293

  • molecular basis of biomineralisation in the chiton radula
  • mollusc shell mineralisation processes
  • ultrastructure of the mineralised tissues of chitons
  • elemental analysis of biomineralised structures
  • calcium and iron biomineralisation
  • molluscan systematics

Dr Peter Brooks

Email: pbrooks@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5430 2828

  • Research interests involve the chemical analysis and isolation of compounds from natural and synthetic materials, and the synthesis of new or novel compounds. Dr Brooks’ expertise is in chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques applied to the trace analysis of important
  • compounds in biological, environmental and industrial samples. Positions held include supervising the chemotaxonomic studies of microorganisms in the Biotechnology Research Centre at La Trobe University, Bendigo, and the operation of an analytic service to industry and the community. Dr Brooks’ current interests are in the isolation of bioactive compounds from microorganisms and the chemical monitoring of the environment

Dr Gabriel Conroy 

Email: gconroy@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5459 4803

  • Ecological genetics
  • conservation biology
  • field ecology
  • fire ecology
  • population viability analysis
  • dynamic simulation modelling

Dr Scott Cummins

Email: scummins@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5501

  • pheromone communication in molluscs
  • molecular basis of reproduction in fish and invertebrates
  • molecular basis of peptides in marine sponges
  • evolutionary divergence of olfactory receptors
  • crown of thorns star fish secretome

Professor Abigail Elizur

Email: aelizur@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5459 4813

  • application of drug delivery systems to hormonal manipulation in aquaculture systems
  • understanding and manipulating reproduction in pearl oysters
  • exploring surrogate technology in aquaculture species
  • using the yeast expression system for the production of recombinant hormones
  • drug delivery in aquaculture fin fish species
  • application of transcriptomics in aquaculture

Associate Professor Wayne Knibb

Email: wknibb@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5430 2831

  • gene discovery
  • pathology detection
  • paternity assignment and breed improvement in aquaculture

Dr Anna Kuballa

Email: akuballa@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5582

  • molecular mechanisms associated with autoimmune disease
  • gene discovery and trait association
  • gene expression and early diagnosis in Crohn’s disease
  • post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in autoimmune diseases such as Crohn’s disease and psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis
  • molluscan metabolic suppression

Dr Ipek Kurtboke

Email: ikurtbok@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5430 2819

  • microbial ecology, diversity and systematics
  • applied and environmental microbiology and biotechnology and bioremediation
  • bacteriophages and bacteriophage therapy
  • industrial microbiology and biodiscovery
  • waste management and bioconversion of waste into environmentally friendly biofertilisers
  • biological control of plant pathogens
  • marine and aquatic microbiology

Dr Robert Lamont

Email: rlamont1@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5459 4463

  • population genetics of endangered species
  • breeding and paternity analysis in aquaculture
  • forest ecology
  • fire ecology

Dr Nguyen Nguyen

Email: NNGUYEN@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5138

  • quantitative genetics
  • breeding and selection
  • genetic improvement for farmed aquaculture species
  • optimise selection programs by including new genetic information (DNA markers)
  • genetics and adaptive response of aquatic animal species to changing environment and climate
  • control reproduction and close production cycle of new species for aquaculture

Dr Steven Ogbourne

Email: sogbourn@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5188

  • biodiscovery
  • population genetics
  • drug development
  • genetic diversity of plants
  • plant propagation for pharmaceutical drug manufacture
  • plant reproductive biology

Dr Renfu Shao

Email: rshao@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5469

  • comparative mitochondrial genomics of insects with high throughput sequencing

Dr Alison Shapcott

Email: ashapcot@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5430 1211

  • ecology and population genetics of rainforest plants
  • conservation genetics and conservation ecology of rare species
  • habitat fragmentation
  • maintenance of biodiversity
  • restoration ecology

Dr Michael Stewart

Email: mstewar1@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5469

  • invertebrate endocrinology
  • the molecular basis of communication in echinoderms and molluscs
  • the molecular and cellular basis of reproduction and development in crustaceans

Dr Sanjeev Kumar Srivastava

Email: ssrivast@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5459 4819

  • fire management
  • predictive spatial modelling
  • GIS application to freshwater ecology
  • climate change
  • GIS learning and teaching

Associate Professor Neil Tindale

Email: ntindale@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5430 1291

  • atmospheric and aqueous chemistry and pollution
  • physicochemical properties and transport of oil slicks
  • local and regional air quality, monitoring and health impacts
  • aerosol transport, chemistry and spectral properties
  • marine biogeochemical cycling
  • nutrient inputs and primary productivity
  • desertification, desert dust emissions, transport and deposition
  • air pollution modelling
  • aquatic pollution and geochemistry
  • water resources
  • air-sea exchange of trace substances
  • real-time or near real-time access, display, and use of environmental monitoring data from remote sites

Associate Professor Stephen Trueman

Email: strueman@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5033

  • plant propagation for forestry, horticulture, revegetation and pharmaceuticals
  • plant tissue culture
  • plant reproductive biology

Dr Tomer Ventura

Email: tventura@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5984

  • comparative endocrinology
  • sexual manipulations in commercially valuable crustacean species
  • regulation of cell migration in crustaceans
  • regulation of metamorphosis in crustaceans
  • pest management

Professor Helen Wallace

Email: hwallace@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5430 1228

  • stingless bees, resin, propolis and seed dispersal
  • plant breeding, genetics and gene flow in forestry, horticulture and natural ecosystems
  • nut processing in Australia (Macadamia) and the South Pacific (Canarium)
  • quality issues in horticultural crops
  • breeding systems and conservation of rare and threatened plants
  • climate change in forests and horticulture

Dr Tianfang Wang

Email: twang@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5982

  • biofunctional proteomics and peptidomics
  • ion chemistry and development of negative ion mass spectrometry
  • computational chemistry –use of quantum mechanics based theoretical computational programmes to study synthetic biomolecules and to predict the structures and behaviour of peptides/proteins

 

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