Science and Environmental Science Honours projects

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Science and Environmental Science Honours projects

Breadcrumbs

Scientists have long sought to understand the fundamental principles of the land, life, water and air that surround us. These, and the functioning of environmental systems, are important areas of research for the next generation. Our research expertise includes:

  • physiology
  • genetics and ecology of plants and animals
  • climate change adaptation
  • science curriculum design and evaluation
  • microbial ecology and biotechnology
  • bioconversion of waste
  • bioremediation and bioprocessing
  • biological control of crop diseases
  • coastal ecology and conservation
  • ecology and population genetics
  • geographical information systems
  • aquatic pollution and geochemistry
  • social and sustainability learning
  • theoretical and analytical chemistry
  • conservation genetics and conservation ecology - fauna; flora; and marine life and systems

Honours can be undertaken in any area of Science, and involves designing a research program in your chosen area of interest in consultation with one or more supervisors.

The following degree programs allow you the opportunity to be awarded with a degree and Honours on their completion.

TitlePrimary supervisor

Development of grafting techniques for breadfruit tree dwarfing

Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis) is a traditional staple tree crop in the Oceania. Susceptibility to windstorm damage is a primary constraint on breadfruit cultivation. Significant tree loss due to tropical windstorm has driven a widespread interest in developing dwarf breadfruit. This project investigates the potentials of breadfruit tree grafting to develop dwarf phenotype. In addition to gain horticultural experiences, such as plant grafting and propagation, students have opportunities to employ advanced molecular techniques, such as microscopic and gene expression analysis, PCR and bioinformatics to examine morphological and physiological changes induced by grafting. This project may involve travel to Fiji or Samoa.

 

Dr Yuchan Zhou

Email: yzhou1@usc.edu.auTel: +61 7 5456 5142

Professor Steven Underhill

Email: sunderhi@usc.edu.au Tel: +61 7 5456 5142or 0412 140 032

Assessing effectiveness of remote sensing techniques to forecast forest biomass and timber volume

This study will evaluation forest biomass using remote sensing techniques and relate this information back to actual timber volume to develop remote sensing based methods to forecast timber production. This study will utilise the multispectral and multitemporal images collected by Landsat sensors to derive several forestry biomass indices. These indices will then be related to archived timber harvest records to evaluate the effectiveness of moderate resolution remote sensing techniques in assessing forest growth.

Dr Sanjeev Srivastava 

Email: SSrivast@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5459 4819

Dr Mohammad Reza Ghaffariyan

Email: mghaffar@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5447

Use of cost path analysis to identify least-cost distance for transporting harvested timber.

This study will focus on using geographical information systems (GIS) based approach to planning a sustainable and productive timber transport solution for the plantation industry. The cost of road construction/maintenance and transport for various possible routes from a selected plantations management area to possible timber mills (user points) will be calculated. Various combinations of environmental, topographic, and anthropogenic (including existing transportation network and fuel consumption) will be explored to create cost surfaces representing locations suitable for transportation of woods. The GIS-based cost path analysis will then be applied to find the best or cheapest routes for each truck to load the woods and deliver to the mill.

Dr Sanjeev Srivastava 

Email: SSrivast@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5459 4819

Dr Mohammad Reza Ghaffariyan

Email: mghaffar@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5447

Closing the gaps in crustacean sex determination and differentiation

Characterization of novel targets for molt and reproduction manipulation in crustaceans

Elucidating the spiny lobster metamorphosis pathways

Crustacean aquaculture is one of the fastest growing food sectors. With the increase in industry volume more sophisticated technologies are required to enhance the sector’s rapid growth and promote its sustainability. Integration of molecular and biochemical techniques together with large dataset bioinformatics analyses enable us to clarify long standing open questions in crustacean reproduction and development. Through collaboration with UTas and using model organisms kept at the USC aquaculture facility, we work towards understanding key mechanisms which govern these important processes. 

Dr Tomer Ventura

Email: tventura@usc.edu.au 

Tel: +61 7 5456 5984 | 0457 892 999

Ready to put away your butterfly collecting net?

Want to work with big business in the commercial space?

Want to see your research have real commercial application and outcomes?

If so a career in “commercial” science may be for you.

The aquaculture genetics breeding group USC has projects for over 12 different species nationally and around the world, including lobsters, prawns, kingfish, pearls, oysters, grouper. We are pioneering very advanced genetic and molecular methods to predict future breeding values of animals using their DNA.

Are you ready for a career in science and industry?

Associate Professor Wayne Knibb

Email: wknibb@usc.edu.auTel: +61 7 5430 2831

 

Conservation genetics of the commercially significant Queensland species, Santalum lanceolatum.

Queensland sandalwood (Santalum lanceolatum R.Br.) has been commercially harvested since 1860. In the Cape York Peninsula (CYP), there was a major industry exporting sandalwood timber to China, however, this industry collapsed around 1940. The remaining trees occur in isolated stands, which are likely to comprise families or clones from root coppice and hence have limited genetic diversity. These isolated stands and are under threat from fire and grazing. This project will determine the genetic diversity and structure of this species in the CYP with the aim of developing an appropriate conservation and domestication program for the species.

In this project you will utilise microsatellite DNA markers and population genetics technology to assess the genetic diversity and structure of CYP Santalum lanceolatum. By undertaking this approach, the successful candidate will develop a broad technical skills base in molecular biology and genetics. The successful candidate will also have an opportunity to participate in field research to collect some of the Santalum lanceolatum material in the CYP.

Start date: Semester 1 or Semester 2, 2017

Dr Steven Ogbourne 

Email:steven.ogbourne@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5188 

Associate Professor David Lee

Email: dlee@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5759

Reducing the extinction risk of Alectryon ramiflorus.

Alectryon ramiflorus is locally known as the Isis tamarind and belongs to the family Sapindaceae. It is listed as endangered under the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 and is known from one main population of less than 50 plants in the Cordalba Forest Reserve. A. ramiflorus is threatened by a combination of extremely low population size, low rates of natural regeneration, restricted habitat availability and a variety of potential environmental factors including fire, drought, grazing and weed invasion. Some populations are further threatened as they occur on land not specifically reserved for protection of biodiversity. The Queensland Government have issued a Recovery Plan for A. ramiflorus and one objective highlighted is to undertake research into the genetic diversity of the species. This project will complete this activity as part of a larger project that aims to reduce the extinction risk of this nationally endangered tree species.

In this project you will develop and utilise microsatellite DNA markers to assess the genetic diversity and population genetic structure of A. ramiflorus. By undertaking this research, the successful candidate will develop a broad technical skills base in molecular biology and conservation genetics. The successful candidate will also have an opportunity to undertake field work to collect samples for analysis.

Start date: Semester 1 or Semester 2, 2017

Dr Steven Ogbourne & Gabriel Conroy

Email:steven.ogbourne@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5188 

Turtles and light exposure in the Sunshine Coast

How does light affect turtle behaviour, particularly nesting site selection? This project aims to measure and model light exposure and relate it to marine turtle ecology.

Start date: Semester 2, 2016 or Semester 1, 2017

Dr Javier Leon and Thomas Schlacher

Email: jleon@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 3405

 

Nearshore bathymetry and marine turtles’ nest-site selection

Landscape features such as beach slope might influence marine turtles’ nest selection. But nothing is known about how seascape features in the nearshore (bars, rips) affect them. This project aims to map the nearshore bathymetry using drones and relate it to marine turtle ecology.

Start date: Semester 2, 2016 or Semester 1, 2017

Dr Javier Leon and Thomas Schlacher

Email: jleon@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 3405 

New Luminescent Materials 

This project involves making new light emitting materials by self-assembly of simple inorganic chemistry building blocks. These materials will be inexpensive, simple to make and emit light under different conditions. Techniques to be employed include organic synthesis, inorganic chemistry, X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy.

Start date: Semester 2, 2016 or Semester 1, 2017

Prof David Young

Email: dyoung1@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 3448

 

Claw shape with body size and habitat in insects, spiders, lizards and birds.

Climbing up and down trees is an important task for many organisms of all shapes and sizes, in many different environments. Claws are remarkably versatile in that with small modifications they are able to perform a variety of functions, in a variety of habitats. This project will examine this variation among insects, spiders and lizard, using museum specimens and live caught specimens to understand variation in claw shape with size and habitat. By understanding how claw shape changes with size and function, we will aid in the design of bioinspired robots and many other bioinspired applications. This project would require a moderate knowledge of photography. Also the ability and willingness to learn coding in Matlab and R is desirable.

Start date: Semester 2, 2016 or Semester 1, 2017

Dr Christofer Clemente

Email: cclement@usc.edu.au

 

The integrative genomics analysis of oncogenes in multiple cancers.

The activation of oncogenes (ONGs) make a major contribution to cancer cell proliferation through genetic mutations. The systematic comparison of known ONGs in different cancers, is essential for cross validating their biological functions as well as developing therapeutic strategies. Recently, we have developed the first literature-based database called ONGene, http://ongene.bioinfo-minzhao.org/. The ongoing project will mainly focus on genomics features including genetics mutation, methylation and gene expression change using online bioinformatics tools. The results will provides most comprehensive ONGs and their features in hundreds of cancer samples.

Start date: Semester 2, 2016 or Semester 1, 2017

Dr Min Zhao

Email: mzhao@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 3402

Coatings to Enhance X-ray Fluoroscopy of Nitinol Alloys for Biomedical Applications

Nitinol, nickel-titanium based alloys, are widely used in biomedical devices, principally due to their superior shape memory and super-elastic properties which make them the alloy of choice for applications requiring high flexibility such as for use in orthodontics, stents and heart valves. A significant limitation for these alloys is their limited fluoroscopic visibility which can hinder delivery and placement of devices fabricated from these alloys during surgical procedures. To address this issue, this project will investigate radiopaque coatings with the aim to enhance x-ray fluoroscopic visibility of the nitinol alloy.

Start date: Semester 2, 2016 or Semester 1, 2017

Dr Damon Kent

Email: dkent@usc.edu.auTel: +61 7 5456 5267

Recovery of the vulnerable Striped Legless Lizard (Delma impar)

The Striped Legless Lizard, Delma impar, is a Threatened species that is restricted to the temperate grasslands of south eastern Australia and is the focus of a national recovery program. This honours project will assist this program by collaborating with Bush Heritage Australia (BHA) who aim to translocate threatened populations of Striped Legless Lizards and establish a protected population at Scottsdale Reserve. This project will essentially be laboratory based, focussing on population genetic analysis. However, it will also require a field trip to Scottsdale Reserve to observe the sampling and the translocation sites. This research project will involve close collaboration with ecologists from BHA.

Start date:  Semester 2, 2016 or Semester 1, 2017

Dr Gabriel Conroy, Dr Steven Ogbourne and Dr Scott Burnett

Email: gconroy@usc.edu.au
Tel: +61 7 5456 4803

The purpose of the research project would be to produce a climate change impact analysis and adaptation plan for Woodfordia. The student, under the supervision of two USC climate change specialists, would work with the Woodfordia managers to identify existing climate related risks and vulnerabilities, determine the baseline climate conditions at the site, develop projections of future climate conditions and identify adaptation options that the site operators could implement to manage potential risks and take advantage of opportunities. Specifically the student would undertake research and develop a research method that reflects best practice in climate change adaptation planning.

Graham Ashford

Email: gashford@usc.edu.au
Tel: +61 7 5430 1141

DNA-Mark-Recapture-Analysis of the Fraser Island Dingo Population

This project runs as part of a pilot study to estimate the size of the iconic Fraser Island dingo population. The project would involve some fieldwork to Fraser Island, as well as some molecular lab-work. Full training can be provided for the latter so prospective students without a strong lab/molecular background should still contact the project supervisors.

 

Dr Gabriel Conroy and Dr Steven Ogbourne

Email: gconroy@usc.edu.au
Tel: +61 7 5456 4803

Development of rapid point-of-care diagnostics for mosquito pathogens

Diseases transmitted by mosquitoes and other vectors contribute to 17% of global burden of infectious diseases. Globally important mosquito pathogens include Malaria, Dengue virus, Chickungya virus, West Nile virus, and Yellow Fever virus. Australia has additional unique viruses to contend with, including Ross River, Barmah Forest, and Murray Valley encephalitis viruses. Projects are available to create rapid diagnostics for mosquito-transmitted diseases.

Start Date: Semester 2 2016

Dr Joanne Macdonald

Email: jmacdon1@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5944

Development and testing of rapid point-of-care diagnostics for improved water quality

Measuring water quality is critical for safe use of water in drinking, recycling or simply post-use release into waterways. Projects are available to apply rapid diagnostic protocols to pathogen detection in water, and test these protocols in conjunction with local utilities and the Smart Water Research Centre at Griffith University.

Start Date: Semester 2, 2016

Dr Joanne Macdonald

Email: jmacdon1@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5944

Improved rapid point-of-care diagnostics

Current limitations in rapid point-of-care diagnostics prevent sensitive analysis of multiple types of specimens. This project involves research into state-of-the art biosensor development and application to detection of viral pathogens.

Start Date: Semester 2, 2016 

Dr Joanne Macdonald

Email: jmacdon1@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5944

Advanced spider silk analysis and engineering

Spider silk is one of the toughest materials in the world – tougher than man-made materials such as Kevlar and Steel. Projects are available to study the strength of silk materials from Australian sources, analyse the molecular construction of natural silk, and create synthetic silks with advanced properties.

Start Date: Semester 2, 2016 

Dr Joanne Macdonald

Email: jmacdon1@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5944

Greener roadways

Transportation is a major source of greenhouse emissions, contributing more than 20% of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion. Projects are available to study the use of additives in asphalt that reduce and absorb pollutants and provide alternative energy sources to reduce reliance on greenhouse emissions.

Start Date: Semester 2, 2016 

Dr Joanne Macdonald

Email: jmacdon1@usc.edu.au

Tel: +61 7 5456 5944

Turtle nesting and beach dynamics in the Sunshine Coast

Dr Javier Leon

Email:jleon@usc.edu.au Tel: +61 7 5456 3405

Conserving surf zone fish: are there contrasting results from land and sea management?

Dr Andrew Olds

Email: aolds@usc.edu.au

Do marine prey resources support invasive pest species in coastal national parks?

Professor Thomas Schlacher

Email: tschlach@usc.edu.au
Tel: +61 7 5430 2847

Are images worth a thousand birds: how many raptors are really on ocean beaches?

Professor Thomas Schlacher

Email: tschlach@usc.edu.au
Tel: +61 7 5430 2847  

Invasive carnivores in marine nature reserves: do foxes and feral pigs compete with raptors for stranded carcasses on island beaches?

Professor Thomas Schlacher

Email: tschlach@usc.edu.au
Tel: +61 7 5430 2847

Impacts of urbanisation on vertebrate scavengers at estuarine interfaces

Professor Thomas Schlacher

Email: tschlach@usc.edu.au
Tel: +61 7 5430 2847

What environmental features determine the southern range edge of ghost crabs?

Climate change is a critical and accelerating threat to biodiversity, globally. It is rearranging the geographic distributions of individual species as they attempt to remain within their preferred climate niches, creating ecological interactions among novel suites of species. This project will study the mechanisms underlying climate-driven range shifts using the ghost crab Ocypode cordimanus. This coastal invertebrate is near unique in meeting all of the criteria required of a model organism for studies in climate-change ecology, and it occupies a habitat that is ideal for such studies. Based on existing observations of distribution and sand temperatures, together with remotely sensed sea and air temperatures, this project will identify the environmental features that control the southern range edge of this species.

Start Date: Semester 2, 2016 or Semester 1, 2017

Dr David Schoeman

Email: dschoema@usc.edu.au
Tel: +61 7 5456 5956

What controls the temperature of beach sand?

The temperature of beach sand is central to patterns of activity and survival of species inhabiting beaches, including turtles. The latter species is particularly vulnerable to incubation temperature, because it determines the sex of the brood. This project will deploy temperature loggers into the sand of local beaches at various depths, and will then model time series from these temperature loggers as a function of time series of various predictors, including air and seawater temperatures (measured directly as well as remotely sensed), sand colour, moisture and particle size, wind speed and duration, etc. These data will help us gain a better understanding of whether turtles will be able to make increasing use of Sunshine and Fraser Coast beaches as global temperatures rise.

Start Date: Semester 2, 2016 or Semester 1, 2017

Dr David Schoeman

Email: dschoema@usc.edu.au
Tel: +61 7 5456 5956

SupervisorAreas

Graham Ashford

Email: gashford@usc.edu.au
Tel: +61 7 5430 1141

  • climate change impact assessment
  • evaluation of climate change adaptation and risk reduction strategies
  • international climate change mitigation policy
  • carbon and biodiversity offset mechanisms
  • economic cost/benefit and multi-criteria assessment
  • selected topics in environmental and natural resource economics

Dr Peter Brooks

Email: pbrooks@usc.edu.au
Tel: +61 7 54302828

  • Research interests involve the chemical analysis and isolation of compounds from natural and synthetic materials, and the synthesis of new or novel compounds. Dr Brooks’ expertise is in chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques applied to the trace analysis of important
  • compounds in biological, environmental and industrial samples. Positions held include supervising the chemotaxonomic studies of microorganisms in the Biotechnology Research Centre at La Trobe University, Bendigo, and the operation of an analytic service to industry and the community. Dr Brooks’ current interests are in the isolation of bioactive compounds from microorganisms and the chemical monitoring of the environment

Dr Scott Burnett

Email: sburnett@usc.edu.au
Tel: +61 7 5459 4812

  • ecology and conservation strategies for endangered vertebrates
  • ecology of Australian carnivorous marsupials
  • novel techniques for monitoring wildlife populations
  • feeding ecology of owls
  • fauna inventory

Associate Professor Wayne Knibb

Email: wknibb@usc.edu.au
Tel:+61 7 5430 2831

  • gene discovery
  • pathology detection
  • paternity assignment and breed improvement in aquaculture

Dr Ipek Kurtboke

Email: ikurtbok@usc.edu.au
Tel:+61 7 5430 2819

  • microbial ecology, diversity and systematics
  • applied and environmental microbiology and biotechnology and bioremediation
  • bacteriophages and bacteriophage therapy
  • industrial microbiology and biodiscovery
  • waste management and bioconversion of waste into environmentally friendly biofertilisers
  • biological control of plant pathogens
  • marine and aquatic microbiology

Joanne Macdonald

Email: jmacdon1@USC.EDU.AU

Tel: +61 7 5456 5944

  • molecular computing
  • smart diagnostic devices
  • therapeutic molecular devices
  • novel molecular materials

Robert McDougall

Email: rmcdouga@usc.edu.au
Tel: +61 7 5456 5838

  • algebra (particularly the radical theory of associative rings)
  • online mathematics education

Dr Andrew Olds

Email: aold@usc.edu.au
Tel:+ 61 4 1745 5162

  • marine and estuarine ecology
  • spatial ecology and connectivity
  • conservation biology
  • ecosystem functioning
  • fish and fisheries ecology

Professor Thomas Schlacher

Email:tschlach@usc.edu.au
Tel: +61 7 5430 2847

  • estuarine ecology and conservation
  • coastal pollution biology
  • sandy beach ecology
  • trophic architecture of deep-sea assemblages
  • biodiversity of deep-sea communities, particularly seamounts

Dr David Schoeman

Email: dschoema@usc.edu.au
Tel: +61 7 5456 5956

  • marine climate-change ecology
  • quantitative ecology
  • sandy beach ecology
  • marine conservation ecology
  • ecological statistics

Dr Renfu Shao

Email: Tel:+61 7 5456 5469

  • comparative mitochondrial genomics of insects with high throughput sequencing

Dr Alison Shapcott

Email: ashapcot@usc.edu.au
Tel:+61 7 5430 1211

  • ecology and population genetics of rainforest plants
  • conservation genetics and conservation ecology of rare species
  • habitat fragmentation
  • maintenance of biodiversity
  • restoration ecology

Dr Sanjeev Kumar Srivastava

Email: SSrivast@usc.edu.au
Tel:+61 7 5459 4819

  • fire management
  • predictive spatial modelling
  • GIS application to freshwater ecology
  • climate change
  • GIS learning and teaching

Associate Professor Neil Tindale

Email: ntindale@usc.edu.au
Tel:+61 7 5430 1291

  • atmospheric and aqueous chemistry and pollution
  • physicochemical properties and transport of oil slicks
  • local and regional air quality, monitoring and health impacts
  • aerosol transport, chemistry and spectral properties
  • marine biogeochemical cycling
  • nutrient inputs and primary productivity
  • desertification, desert dust emissions, transport and deposition
  • air pollution modelling
  • aquatic pollution and geochemistry
  • water resources
  • air-sea exchange of trace substances
  • real-time or near real-time access, display, and use of environmental monitoring data from remote sites

Professor Helen Wallace

Email: hwallace@usc.edu.au
Tel:+61 7 5430 1228

  • stingless bees, resin, propolis and seed dispersal
  • plant breeding, genetics and gene flow in forestry, horticulture and natural ecosystems
  • nut processing in Australia (Macadamia) and the South Pacific (Canarium)
  • quality issues in horticultural crops
  • breeding systems and conservation of rare and threatened plants
  • climate change in forests and horticulture

Dr Aaron Wiegand

Email: awiegand@usc.edu.au
Tel: +61 7 5430 1139

  • computer modelling and analysis in:
  • atmospheric processes (air pollution chemistry and dispersion)
  • forestry
  • biomechanics and sports science
  • microbiology

Dr Greg Watson

Email: gwatson1@usc.edu.au
Tel: +61 7 5456 5268

  • Determining insect cuticle chemistry using Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR)
  • The development of new University undergraduate experiments (as well as Secondary and Primary school experiments) for chemistry and physics subjects based on cutting edge research of liquid droplet interactions
  • Adhesion, wetting properties and self-cleaning properties of contact points on targeted insect cuticle regions such as antennae and wings
  • Airborne contaminant adhesion on artificial surfaces found in houses (e.g. fibres, and polymers): Investigations of various particles e.g., fungal spores, pollens, bacteria
  • Airborne contaminant effects on insect surfaces: investigations of various particles e.g., fungal spores, pollens, bacteria
  • Environmental chemical exposure to living cells - responses investigated using atomic force microscopy
  • Nano clamping of nano-tears on polymer surfaces
  • Nano and micro natural nanostructures on insect wings: from superhydrophobicity & water capture to the next self cleaning technologies
  • Frictional studies of earth dwelling insects and crustaceans
  • Controlled frictional differentiation on a polymer surface for selectively patterning chemistry for separation of biological molecules
  • Surface degradation of pharmaceutical medicines analysed by scanning probe microscopy
  • Flight mechanisms of ultra-light weight insects in natural and urban environments
  • Cooling responses of paper wasps under varied environmental conditions
  • Mechanical properties and functioning of insect wing membranes
  • Pesticides comprised of hydrophobic particle films for control of insects and plant diseases: Adhesional interactions and wetting properties
  • Towards healthier waterways: Characterisation and quantitative measurement of aquatic nano and micro-particles using atomic force microscopy
  • Establishing temperature profiles for ghost crab holes correlated with spatial positioning and tidal responses

Dr Sarah Windsor

Email: swindsor@usc.edu.au
Tel: +61 7 5456 5750

  • In theoretical chemistry, Dr Windsor formulated a new algorithm for calculating energy and angular momentum resolved intermonomer density of states; convoluted new algorithm with the intramonomer density of states via the well used Beyer-Swinehart algorithm; and calculated rate constants and species lifetimes using these densities of states
  • In analytical chemistry, Dr Windsor analysed the amount of methylglyoxal and dihydroxyacetone in Australian Leptospermum polygalifolium honeys via High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC).
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