What you need to know

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What you need to know

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Myths and facts about university study

If you’re thinking about studying at uni you’ve no doubt found that there is so much information to sort through and understand before you can make your decision. You’ve probably also wondered if some of the things you’ve heard are really true.

Here are some common myths about studying at uni… and the facts straight from the source.

University study is all book learning

False. Not at USC it’s not. Most USC programs incorporate practical, hands-on learning and there are plenty of opportunities for internships, work placements and field work. Some USC programs are ground-breaking in offering practical experience to first year students – like the USC Law School which offers real-life professional practice experience from first year.

I’ll be just one more student in a group of hundreds

False. USC students often talk about how much they love the amount of face-to-face contact they have with their lecturers and tutors and the small group learning opportunities that USC offers.

Callum Lee, Bachelor of Laws/Bachelor of Commerce (Accounting) and USC Superhero

I have friends at unis with thousands of students and they don’t know their lecturers by name. Here we stop and have a coffee with our lecturers and get to know them which really helps. You have a real friendship with your lecturers and want to learn well so you don’t let them down. See Callum's story

I only need to pass to get the same degree as everyone else

Well yes that’s true but nothing feels as good as knowing that you’ve become really good at something. And being really good at something just might be what makes you stand out when you go for a job. Besides, if your grades are higher you’ll have more opportunities to apply for things like scholarships and overseas study placements.

I have to finish my degree in the time shown on the course guide

False. Every USC program has a maximum time limit for completion. Bachelor degree programs, for example, that have a 3yr fulltime duration, have a maximum time limit of ten years. This means that you can study part-time if you need to. You may also be able to take a break in your study of up to two years, even if you’ve already started. If you’re not ready to start uni as soon as you finish school you can defer your offer for up to two years.

Uni is just for young people. If I’m a bit older I’ll stand out

False. There are people of all ages studying at USC – the average age of USC students is 25 and more than half are over 21 years old. One of the great things about studying at university is that you’re surrounded by people who share common interests and friendships will grow regardless of the age gap.

The assignments and exams will be really difficult and I won’t be able to cope

This is not entirely true. Yes university assessments can be challenging but at USC your course is structured to ensure that you’re given plenty of opportunity to build your understanding and demonstrate what you’ve learned through your assessment requirements.

If you’re concerned about your study skills, USC can help with a range of academic and study support services including workshops and events, one-to-one support and online study resources. Learn more… 

Kristy Maksan, Bachelor of Psychology (Honours) and USC Superhero

When I first came to USC I was worried about the standards for the assessments. But I’ve found that they train you to get used to the level that’s expected so you can grow. My life has really changed since I came to USC. I sleep better! And I’m much more confident because I know I can pass assessments and get good grades. I never thought I could get good grades! See Kristy's story

I’ll end up with a massive debt

It is true that University degrees can be costly but it’s important to remember that you’re investing in the skills and development that will help you to build a career that you’ll love. Data shows that the average salary for university qualified people is {quote statistic} more than those who don’t hold a degree.

If you’re eligible you can choose to defer your tuition fees and this is where your debt will start to accumulate as a FEE-HELP loan with the Australian government. Once you earn more than the threshold amount, you’ll start to make compulsory repayments by paying a higher rate of tax. Find out more about how this all works here [LINK TO FEE-HELP PAGE].

I can do everything the night before it’s due

You can try but it’s probably not a good idea. Once you’ve submitted a few assignments you’ll know how long it will take you to write that 3000 word essay. But in the meantime it’s a good idea to have a look at your assessment as soon as it’s released and get an idea of what’s involved….try to start at least two weeks before it’s due. Or you can try USC’s awesome assignment calculator to keep your work on track.

Rhett Allen, Bachelor of Biomedical Science and USC Superhero

In my first week I figured out don’t arrive right on time! It’ll take you about 20 minutes to get from your car and find your lecture. I got lost on my first day and was in the wrong lecture. I started thinking “this does not seem relevant to Chemistry.” I probably should have used the “Lost on Campus “ app. And I usually have to choose between buying coffee or parking so I have to park a long way away. See Rhett's story

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