Theme 2: Building Caring Communities - University of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia

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Theme 2: Building Caring Communities

To take care of oneself – and others, to flourish, and engage in slow scholarship.

Academic life is changing – with neoliberal agendas and ways of working and counting driving much of what we do, demanding so much of us. The academy compels us to compete, to work on our own, to overwork, to count narrowly. This second theme encourages us to consider how we might change our own work situations and workplaces to support an ethic of care and caring.

To care for ourselves and others, to work in more ‘care-full’ ways. To find ways to slow down and claim time for slow scholarship and communal, collaborative ways of working and being an academic. With this theme we consider what it means to build caring academic communities, and we look to the ways those among us are building a kinder culture of possibilities that allow us to not only to do our best work, but to be our best selves.

We use this theme to explore what it might mean to live well, and to give attention to how we work and interact with one another. And, to contemplate where we need support, where we might give support. We continue to trouble the intensification of our work by corporate techniques and remember our relational and heart-spirit-mind-body connections. Notions of care, slow scholarship, flourishing and community permeate this theme.

Prepare for Theme 2

Preparation materials for Theme 2

Theme 2 Keynote

The life of slow scholarship

Four years ago, eleven women came together to write a paper advocating for a collective, feminist vision of slow scholarship. Our goal was to contribute to a growing dialogue around the concept of slow scholarship, and the ideas have taken on many new lives, and been embraced and critiqued in many ways. We are excited to have this unique forum to explain how and why we wrote the paper, and to explain what slow scholarship means to us. We will also describe some key moments in the life of the slow scholarship idea and slow scholarship practices, and we’ll end with a discussion of our current thinking, as mid-career scholars, about how to create lasting imprints for a better future inside and outside the academy.

Presenters

Alison Mountz
Alison Mountz
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Trina Hamilton
Trina Hamilton
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Theme 2 Panel

Living slow scholarship

This panel of members of the Great Lakes Feminist Geography Collective will build on the keynote lecture about our advocacy for a collective, feminist vision of slow scholarship. With particular insights from Canadian universities, we will discuss the structural context within which slow scholarship is both necessary and difficult. In addition to the worrisome trends, however, we want to highlight the worthy experiments, both institutional and personal, of living the slow scholarship ideals. Drawing from our own experiences, and from the conference participants, we will identify opportunities to shift our institutions and engage in everyday resistance.

Presenters

Ranu Basu
Ranu Basu
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Jennifer Hyndman
Jennifer Hyndman
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Margaret Walton Roberts
Margaret Walton-Roberts
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