ACPIR Pacific Seminar Series: Presented by Dr Monal Lal and Mr Kelly Brown - University of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia

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ACPIR Pacific Seminar Series: Presented by Dr Monal Lal and Mr Kelly Brown

Each Pacific Seminar Series will feature a presentation a topic to open for discussion. We encourage cross disciplinary conversations. All are welcome. ​

This month's topic: How many stocks do we have? Using genetics and oceanographic tools for fishery and acquaculture management

Presented by: Dr Monal Lal and Mr Kelly Brown

When: 12nn-1pm Wed 29 June, 2022

Where: Online from Fiji

Register online

Aquaculture of invertebrate commodities such as pearl oysters and sea cucumbers in Pacific Island Countries and Territories (PICTs) holds great promise for developing and supporting livelihoods for coastal communities. In many PICTs, wild populations are relied upon to provide juveniles for culture, as hatchery-based production is developed. It is important that these wild (and in some cases, already heavily fished) populations are carefully managed to ensure sustainable fisheries and aquaculture practices. Scientific tools such as population genomics and oceanographic modelling can inform these approaches, to ensure appropriate conservation and fishery management is implemented. Here, we outline how population genetics and oceanographic tools were applied to the black-lip pearl oyster and a sea cucumber (sandfish) in Fiji, to better understand how both wild and farmed populations can be managed.

Dr. Monal Lal is a USC research fellow with interests in tropical aquaculture, population genomics, fisheries science and oceanography applied to the Pacific region and tropical species. Monal currently implements ACIAR-funded research for development in fisheries and aquaculture in the Pacific region.

Mr Kelly Brown is the curator of the USP Marine Collection, a natural history repository for taxa from the South Pacific region. His research interests include marine biology, taxonomy and population genomics. He is trained in biodiversity data management, with over 12 years of coral reef ecology experience.