Annual Report 2010 (text-only version)

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Report of the Council of the University of the Sunshine Coast

For the period 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2010

1 March 2011

The Hon Cameron Dick MP

Minister for Education and Industrial Relations

In accordance with the provisions of the Financial Accountability Act 2009 and the Financial and Performance Management Standard 2009, and the detailed requirements set out in the Annual Report Requirements for Queensland Government Agencies (June 2010), I have the honour to present to you, on behalf of the Council of the University of the Sunshine Coast, the Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2010.

John M Dobson OAM

Chancellor

Acknowledgment of country

The University of the Sunshine Coast acknowledges the Gubbi Gubbi people as the traditional owners and custodians of the land on which the campus stands, and recognises the strength, resilience and capacity of Aboriginal people in this land.

The University has a Reconciliation Action Plan (2009-2011) to guide its relationships, opportunities and progress reporting with regard to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. 

Communication objectives

This annual report meets the reporting requirements of the Queensland Minister for Education and Industrial Relations.

The University of the Sunshine Coast’s 2010 annual report provides a record of the University’s performance in 2010, its plans for the future, and audited financial statements. All achievements for 2010 are documented against the goals and corresponding key performance indicators of the University’s Strategic Plan 2005–2011.

Potential readers of the annual report include federal, state and local government representatives and officers, the University community (including staff and students), business and media, potential benefactors, international visitors and members of the public.

Copies of the 2010 annual report are available from the Office of Marketing and Communications, University of the Sunshine Coast, by telephoning +61 7 5459 4558 or faxing +61 7 5430 1187. The report is also available online at www.usc.edu.au/reports.

The University of the Sunshine Coast is committed to providing accessible services to people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. If you have difficulty understanding the annual report, contact the Office of Marketing and Communications on +61 7 5459 4558 to arrange an interpreter to effectively communicate the report to you.

University of the Sunshine Coast

90 Sippy Downs Drive

SIPPY DOWNS QLD 4556

AUSTRALIA

Tel: +61 7 5430 1234

Fax: +61 7 5430 1111

Email: information@usc.edu.au

Web: www.usc.edu.au

© University of the Sunshine Coast 2011

ISSN 1837-7521

Published by University of the Sunshine CoastMarch 2011.

Information contained in this publication was correct at the time of publishing. For themost up-to-date information about the University, visit www.usc.edu.au. All amounts are in Australian dollars. University of the Sunshine Coast is registered on the Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students. CRICOS Provider Number: 01595D.

Standing

On opening in 1996, the University of the Sunshine Coast became the first greenfield university to be established in Australia since 1975. The University serves the Sunshine Coast and impacts strongly on the economic and cultural development of the region. USC pursues distinctiveness through long-term strategies focused on two major themes: a commitment to local, national and international engagement; and sustainability. These strategic activities encompass many aspects of university life: an increasing suite of academic teaching and research programs promoting sustainability; pursuing development of a sustainable university through its campus enhancement activities; its ‘architectural laboratory’ approach to sub-tropical buildings; its emphasis on sustainability of business through the Innovation Centre; and many other initiatives which are preoccupying an increasing number of staff and students.

Mission

The mission of the University of the Sunshine Coast is:

To be the major catalyst for the innovative and sustainable economic, cultural and educational advancement of the region, through the pursuit of international standards in teaching, research and engagement.

Values

In pursuing its mission and conducting daily operations, the University is committed to:

  • the advancement, dissemination and preservation of knowledge through innovative and effective teaching and research of the highest quality;
  • fostering freedom of inquiry and expression;
  • the process of lifelong learning;
  • engaging in and responding to the community’s intellectual, cultural and economic needs;
  • adopting consultative processes and ethical behaviour in all activities;
  • engendering respect among students, staff and Council of the University for their diverse roles and contributions;
  • fairness, openness, honesty, trust and effective communication as fundamental expectations of students, staff and all associated with the University;
  • developing the University and its surrounds as an environmentally sensitive exemplar; and
  • the advancement of human rights within a tolerant and inclusive society, in which respect for Indigenous and international peoples is fundamental.

Highlights

  • On-campus student enrolments increased by more than 17 percent in 2010. First preference applications for Semester 1, 2010 entry increased by 26 percent over 2009.
  • Research income, refereed publications and numbers of graduating research students continued to rise in 2010.
  • Research involving scientists from the University of the Sunshine Coast into the domestication of southern bluefin tuna at land-based hatcheries earned the prestigious national “Excellence in Innovation” prize, presented to the Australian Seafood Cooperative Research Centre in recognition of the outstanding innovation and commercial application of its research with South Australian company Clean Seas Tuna Ltd. In 2010 USC researchers were awarded almost $650,000 in funding through the Seafood CRC.
  • During 2010 USC confirmed its place in the $10 million Pacific Agribusiness Research and Development Initiative (PARDI) with a USC scientist confirmed as leader of the Forestry component. PARDI is an Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research initiative being delivered through a partnership of Australian and Pacific Island agencies and providing a platform for stronger economic growth of Pacific Island countries.
  • For the second consecutive year, the Good Universities Guide confirmed USC as the only public university in Queensland to obtain five stars for the quality of staff teaching. Four stars were achieved for graduate satisfaction, also the highest ranking awarded to any public university in Queensland.
  • USC repeated last year’s record of six prestigious Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) citations, with six outstanding University of the Sunshine Coast academics recognised.
  • International on-campus enrolments (EFTSL) grew 12 percent, and in 2010, made up approximately 13 percent of total on-campus enrolments (EFTSL). More than 1,300 on-campus international students from 70 countries studied at USC during the year.
  • International students ranked the University second in Australia (out of 29 Australian universities) for overall satisfaction in the i-Graduate International Student Barometer (ISB), the largest annual study of international students in the world.
  • Experienced Indonesian teachers from the Indonesian province of Papua completed placements at Sunshine Coast high schools as part of the University’s unique, cross-cultural professional development project, with financial backing from the Australian and Indonesian governments and strong support from local schools.
  • The campus saw construction underway for: a $5 million Engineering and Paramedic Science facility including large open spaces suitable for concrete stress tests, hydraulic engineering experiments, photovoltaic cell (solar cell) testing and accident scene simulations; and a $2.4 million Olympic swimming pool as the first phase of the University’s planned Aquatic Centre to be built adjacent its existing Health and Sport Centre, sports stadium and athletics track.
  • Federal and State governments supported the establishment of a $1.8 million child care centre on campus to be operated by the AEIOU Foundation (a not-for-profit organisation dedicated to children with autism). The centre is expected to open by mid-2011.
  • The Innovation Centre continued to support the start-up and growth of businesses in sectors such as ICT, clean technology, health technology and creative industries, and ran 25 business education and networking events attracting 843 delegates in 2010.
  • Vice-Chancellor and President, Professor Paul Thomas AM, achieved an Australian university first by receiving a prestigious international award for excellence in leadership by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE).
  • Professor Greg Hill was appointed Vice-Chancellor and President (Designate) in June 2010 until founding Vice-Chancellor Professor Thomas AM officially completed his term and commenced retirement in December 2010. Professor Hill’s term of office as Vice-Chancellor and President commenced in January 2011.

Key five-year figures

Category20062007200820092010Annual % change
Number of students 1 4,760 5,246 5,833 6,325 7,276 15.0%
Female 2,807 3,163 3,624 4,074 4,764 16.9%
Male 1,953 2,083 2,209 2,251 2,512 11.6%
On-campus students 4,267 4,750 5,383 6,092 7,148 17.3%
Undergraduate 3,494 3,811 4,239 4,827 5,700 18.1%
Postgraduate coursework 773 867 904 732 655 -10.5%
Higher degree by research 71 100 118 129 140 8.5%
Non-award 427 469 573 638 781 22.4%
International (all students) 730 855 977 880 870 -1.1%
International (on campus) 414 527 674 766 855 11.6%
Student load (EFTSL) 2 3745.8 4131.4 4597.3 5332.7 6015.8 12.8%
Degrees conferred            
Undergraduate 535 592 591 656 1,026 56.4%
Postgraduate coursework 313 492 654 569 582 2.3%
Higher degree by research 9 13 11 12 22 83.3%
Total 857 1,097 1,256 1,237 1,630 31.8%
Equity            
Disability 3 4.12% 3.80% 3.52% 4.66% 5.57% 0.9%
Indigenous 3 1.19% 1.50% 1.63% 1.84% 1.44% -0.4%
First in family to attend university 4 52% 52% 52% 51% 49% -2.0%
Number of staff (full-time equivalent, excluding casuals)            
Academic 5 123 144 173 188 210 11.7%
Non-academic 6 242 280 295 329 351 6.7%
Total 365 423 468 517 561 8.5%
Proportion of academic staff with higher degree qualifications 87% 85%  83% 77% 79% 2%
Operating revenue (parent entity) $66.80m $78.40m $94.98m $109.04m $121.07m 11.03%
Research income 7 $1.97m $2.99m $3.35m $4.27m $5.08m 8 6.94%
Research publications 9 119.36 120.96 196.74 177.11 NA 8
Property, plant and equipment $126.80m $146.55m $165.31m $169.40m $167.17m 1.32%

1. Number of students is at Census 1, each year.

2. Student load includes inbound exchange students. EFTSL = Equivalent Full Time Student Load and for 2010 is based on preliminary dataas at Census 2, 2010.

3. Disability and Indigenous percentages are as aproportion of domestic students only.

4. First in family percentages are as a proportion ofundergraduate students only.

5. Academic (Vice-Chancellor; Deputy Vice-Chancellor;Teaching and Research (Level A-E) staff).

6. Non-academic (Administrative, Professional andTechnical (APT) Level 1–10 staff; APT staff above award).

7. Figures include research income reported to the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research (DIISR) through theHigher Education Research Data Collection (HERDC), as well as research funding received from DIISR.

8. HERDC figure for the previous year is not finalised.

9. Weighted calculation reported to DIISR in the HERDC.

Vice-Chancellor’s review

2010 has been characterised by significant change in the University’s management. After some 16 years leading the institution, foundation Vice-Chancellor, Professor Paul Thomas AM, handed over administration of the University to the Vice-Chancellor and President Designate, Professor Greg Hill in mid-June. Selection of a new Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Professor Birgit Lohmann, and a foundation Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research), Professor Roland De Marco, was completed during the second half of the year. Both take up their new roles in early 2011. Two long-standing Deans, Professor Pam Dyer and Professor Rod Simpson, retired at the end of 2010.

The remarkable growth that has characterised the University since its establishment has continued, with around 7,150 students on campus. Student numbers have roughly doubled in the last five years and USC has been the fastest growing campus in the country for a number of consecutive years now. The growth in student load experienced for the year sees USC well positioned for future growth, especially leading into 2012 when enrolments are deregulated.

Despitethe rapid growth in student numbers, the quality of learning and teaching has remained high. All national surveys aimed at gauging satisfaction with teaching and the overall educational experience place USC in the top quartile of universities Australia-wide. The University was the top-ranked public university in Queensland for teaching quality and graduate satisfaction in the most recent Good Universities Guide.

This recognition from students is matched by recognition through the Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC). For the second year running, USC staff received six Citations for Excellence in Learning and Teaching. Based on numbers of staff, or students, this is by far the best performance of any university in Australia.

Thei ncentives for growth and social inclusion being introduced by the Commonwealth through the Higher Education Participation and Partnerships Program (HEPPP) have seen the University expanding its interaction with schools, TAFEs and communities across the broader region. This activity will increase substantially if the Structural Adjustment Fund (SAF) application submitted in 2010 is successful.

The quite spectacular research successes of 2009 were consolidated in 2010 witha dditional national awards and major grants. Twenty-five higher degree by research (HDR) candidates graduated in 2010, which is a marked increase on previous years where numbers have been around 10 per annum for some time. An increase in the research block grant allocations to USC and an institutional commitment to growing research is witnessing a greater investment in research infrastructure and activity.

After many years of false starts, funding sources were finally aligned for the Olympic swimming pool project. Construction is underway on the pool as Stage I of a much larger aquatic centre concept. The new science workshops were completed by the end of the year, providing excellent facilities for engineering and paramedic science. A range of refurbishments are being completed to expand capacity for the coming year and Council has approved construction of a new $4.75 million building as part of the science cluster. Work begins on this early in 2011.

The University is actively engaged in planning for the Sunshine Coast University Hospital, the Sippy Downs town centre and urban developments such as the Caloundra South project. All of these will be crucial elements of the University and the region in the future.

Professor Greg Hill
Vice-Chancellor and President

Institutional forward planning 2011
  • Implement new strategic plan and rewrite its planning derivatives that drive University business.
  • Further align the University’s strategic directions with the HEPPP agenda and the Compact Agreement.
  • Complete review of organisational structure and the faculties.
  • Manage infrastructure provision to enable the University’s growth potential.
  • Closely monitor student and staff satisfaction as the institution continues to grow rapidly.
  • Commence next stage of growing the research capacity and outputs of the University.
  • Engage in regional planning with the Sunshine Coast University Hospital, the Sippy Downs town centre, and the Caloundra South urban development that will accommodate 50,000 new residents on the Sunshine Coast.

Financial review

The University’s financial position continued to strengthen through 2010 as a result of increased student load, reductions in expenditure and increased research and consultancy efforts.

Results for the year included an operating surplus of $16.29 million, with an operating margin of 13 percent.

Income and expenditure

Total income for the year was $121.07 million - an increase of $12.03 million (11 percent) on the previous year. The increase was driven primarily by continued growth in Commonwealth-funded student places and the receipt of capital funds. Funds derived from government sources totalled $94.49 million or 78 percent of revenue (includes advance payments in relation to HECS-HELP funding but excludes up-front student fees), an increase of $11.55 million (14 percent) on the previous year.

Expenses for the year totalled $104.76 million – an increase of $13.19 million (14 percent) received in the previous year. This increase can be attributed to an increase in employee benefits due to the four percent administration wage increase in January 2010 and increase in provisioning for long service leave with an ageing workforce. In addition, a number of non-capitalised refurbishments and minor works were undertaken to achieve space management goals.

Asset growth

At year’s end, the University’s net assets totalled $177.62 million - $12.59 million (7.6 percent) more than in the previous year. This reflected the accumulation of cash reserves for future years’ capital expenditure and associated strategic initiatives.

Expenditure on consulting services
Category2009 ($)2010 ($)
Professional / technical 1,973,408 2,811,567
Communications 1,100 1,560
Finance / accounting 58,255 68,746
Information technology 398,097 682,657
Human resource management 1,727 14,809
Management 130,478 122,538
General 48,620 0
Total 2,611,685 3,701,877

Organisation

Basis of authority

The institution was established under the Sunshine Coast University College Act 1994 and took its first students in 1996. Full university powers were granted under the University of the Sunshine Coast Act 1998.

Functions and powers

The University’s functions are to:

  • provide education at university standard;
  • provide facilities for, and encourage, study and research;
  • encourage the advancement and development of knowledge, and its application to government, industry, commerce and the community;
  • provide courses of study or instruction, at levels of achievement the Council considers appropriate, to meet the needs of the community;
  • confer higher education awards;
  • disseminate knowledge and promote scholarship;
  • provide facilities and resources for the wellbeing of the University’s staff, students and other persons undertaking courses at the University;
  • exploit commercially, for the University’s benefit, a facility or resource of the University, including, for example, study, research or knowledge, or the practical application of study, research or knowledge, belonging to the University, whether alone or with someone else; and
  • perform other functions given to the University under the Act or another Act.

The University’s powers are:

Under the University ofthe Sunshine Coast Act 1998 the University has all the powers of an individual. It may, for example:

  1. enter into contracts;
    1. acquire, hold, dispose of, and deal with property;
    2. appoint agents and attorneys;
    3. engage consultants;
    4. fix charges, and other terms, for services and other facilities it supplies; and
    5. do anything else necessary or convenient to be done for its functions.
     
  2. Without limiting subsection (1), the University has the powers given to it under its Act or another Act.
  3. The University may exercise its powers inside and outside Queensland.
  4. Without limiting subsection (3), the University may exercise its powers outside Australia.

Strategic framework

The imperative of a changing policy environment and increasing national and international competition requires that the University energetically pursue its distinctiveness through a long-term strategic approach built around two major themes:

  • regional engagement
  • sustainability
Regional engagement

The University has earned an international reputation for implementing the engagement emphasis of its mission. Engagement has been at local, national and international levels, and is manifest across the spectrum of University activities.The University is intent on developing its symbiotic relationship with the regional community as a springboard for wider national and international engagement.

Sustainability

Concepts of sustainability drove the way in which the University was conceived and developed, including through sustainable master planning, sub-tropical architectural design, and academic teaching and research related to the sustainable development of the Sunshine Coast region. The concept is now much wider, and encompasses every aspect of human life—social inclusion, energy for the future, the effective and equitable use of natural resources, preservation of built and natural environments, preservation of cultural and social heritages, and the development of sustainable economic opportunities.

Planning for the future

The Strategic Plan is the University’s highest-level planning document, along with the Master Plan. Functional Plans apply University-wide and drive resource allocations through the budget process, complementing the Strategic Plan. Operational Plans for individual cost centres support initiatives outlined in both the Strategic and Functional Plans.

All plans are reviewed and updated during the budget and planning process in September each year. The Strategic Plan underwent a consultative review in 2010 to facilitate the development of a new plan and corresponding performance indicators. The new Strategic Plan 2011-2015 was approved at the December Council meeting and is due to take effect from 1 January 2011. See Appendix 1 on page 108.

Annual review of operations

As a review of its operations each year, the University of the Sunshine Coast measures its progress according to the goals and key performance indicators foreight areas, as outlined by the Strategic Plan (2005-2011):

  • growth and development
  • learning and teaching
  • research
  • regional engagement
  • internationalisation
  • student support
  • staff
  • environmental sustainability

Growth and Development review

GOAL To promote growth toenhance quality and efficiency, whilst retaining important benefits of humans cale

2010 saw growth in...
Students

A record intake of 3,094 new students pushed the University’s student population to 7,276 (including 870 international students) by Semester 1 census. The intake was a 15 percent increase on Semester 1, 2009. This is the largest percentage growth since 2000, and continues the double digit growth the University has experienced in nearly all years since its inception.

The success in student growth carried into mid-year—the Semester 2, 2010 intake saw more than 1,400 new students enrolled by the census date.

With the student growth experienced this year it is expected the University will meet its target of doubling in size within the next 10 years. The University’s priority throughout 2010 was planning how to manage that growth through the provision of campus infrastructure and buildings.

Student growth in 2011 is assured. As at 20 December, QTAC’s first preferences for study at the University in 2011 had increased by eight percent over the previous year (compared to a Queensland institutional average of one percent growth). The total number of preferences for USC increased by 12 percent over the same period, indicating strong overall interest in USC programs.

St Andrews Anglican College graduate, Chelsea Wallis, commenced her studies at USC in 2010—at the age 15. Chelsea has a genius IQ score of 165 and jumped two year levels while at school, and has enrolled to study a combined Arts / Business degree to specialise in international relations or international business. Chelsea received one of five Heller Merit Scholarships, valued at $6,000 each.

Alumni

Consecutive years of growth in student numbers necessitated the introduction of a second Graduation ceremony, held in October. The Chancellor conferred awards for more than 470 graduates at the ceremony. Overall, the University welcomed almost 1,800 new graduates into its alumni cohort in 2010. Several national and local identities received honorary awards at the 2010 Graduation ceremonies: Honorary Doctorates of the University were awarded to Richard Woolcott AC, Tim Fairfax AM and Hagen Stehr AO, while honorary Senior Fellowships of the University were awarded to Bob and Christine Cameron, Tomas Passeggi (a USC graduate) and Lyndon Davis.

Graduates were welcomed back to campus with a 10-year alumni reunion for the Class of 2000.

Three high-achieving graduates received the 2010 Outstanding Alumni of the Year Awards: popular children’s author and USC academic Associate Professor Gary Crew; the CEO of Hong Kong’s Financial Reporting Council Dr PM Kam; and Townsville-based Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs Prevention Coordinator Madonna Kennedy.

Programs

The Bachelor of Nursing Science was again the most popular program at USC, with more than 200 new students enrolled at Semester 1 Census. Enrolments in the program accounted for almost eight percent of the total student body. The new Bachelor of Education (Primary) was one of the University’s most popular programs, with 145 students commencing the program in Semester 1.

Top 10 undergraduate programs in 2010: 

  1. Bachelor of Nursing Science
  2. Bachelor of Social Science (Psychology)
  3. Bachelor of Arts
  4. Bachelor of Sport and Exercise Science
  5. Bachelor of Paramedic Science
  6. Bachelor of Education / Bachelor of Science
  7. Bachelor of Business
  8. Bachelor of Education / Bachelor of Arts
  9. Bachelor of Education (Early Childhood) / Bachelor of Human Services
  10. Bachelor of Journalism

OP1 student Kristi Browne chose to study a Bachelor of Paramedic Science at USC in 2010. The degree was the third most popular for new students. Kristi also received one of the University’s Renouf Family Scholarships worth $12,000.

Revenue

The University started the year in a strong financial position, carrying an operating surplus of $17 million into 2010. An 11 percent increase in income was achieved to just over $121 million, due mainly to international student fees, capital funding from the Commonwealth, and a reduction in spending.

While the increase in enrolments in 2010 equated to an increase in income, it also necessitated significant capital expenditure (or allocations of future expenditure) to accommodate pipeline growth.

Facilities

Construction commenced on a $5 million shared-space facility for use by engineering and paramedic science students. The Engineering and Science Training Facility provides large open spaces suitable for concrete stress testing, hydraulic engineering experiments, photovoltaic cell testing and accident scene simulations. The facility also includes several laboratories and tutorial rooms. Funded through the Learning and Teaching Infrastructure Fund and the Capital Development Pool, the building was ready for teaching in Semester 1, 2011.

Construction of the University’s long-awaited Olympic-standard swimming pool commenced in November. The heated 10-lane, 50-metre pool will be used for specialised research and testing of elite athletes, while also being available for general community use. The Queensland Government contributed $900,000 toward the $2.4 million project, with remaining funds provided by the University, community donations and in-kind support during construction. A fundraising campaign aims to raise $300,000. It is expected to open in mid-2011.

The University’s wireless network was expanded to provide coverage to all buildings on campus. The connection and configuration process was also streamlined and simplified for enhanced usability.

Federal and state government funding was received to establish a child care centre on campus by mid-2011. The centre will provide 75 child care places, including 25 places for children with special needs (autism), and will be run by the AEIOU Foundation. Federal Minister for Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, Jenny Macklin, and Queensland Minister for Disability Services, Annastacia Palaszczuk, announced total funding contributions in excess of $2 million towards construction and operating costs. USC donated the land for the centre, which will provide teaching placement and research opportunities for students and staff.

Research

External research grant income has increased almost five-fold during the period 2005 - 2010. In 2010 research grant income was $3.36 million (figure unaudited).

The total number of Higher Degree by Research completions for 2010 will be between 20 and 25. This is a steadying in completions after the significant increase experienced in 2009 (itself a result of a comparable increase in enrolments in 2007). Student completions are expected to grow slowly for the next two years.

The total number of Higher Degree by Research conferrals for 2010 reached 22. This was an 83 percent increase on full-year 2009 conferrals.

The University’s specialised water testing facility gained accreditation for both chemical testing and biological testing from the National Association of Testing Authorities (NATA). It is now the only dedicated NATA public water testing facility on the Sunshine Coast, and has a focus on environmental, potable, marine and sewage water.

USC’s focus on research was further advanced with the creation of the position of Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research). Professor Roland De Marco of Curtin University of Technology was appointed to the position and will commence at the University in January 2011. See also page 39.

Reputation

The University produced a new television commercial expanding on the ‘best of both worlds’ tagline, and focussing specifically on the University’s research efforts in climate change, forestry and aquaculture (see also page 35).

Reflecting the University’s increasing interest inattracting students from outside the Sunshine Coast, advertising and career events were extended north to Hervey Bay.

Coinciding with the television campaign, a series of press advertisements reinforced the concept that natural environments like the Sunshine Coast have been found to be conducive to creative and original thinking (see also page 35). The message was carried through outdoor advertising on buses and billboards.

Awareness and reputation for USC continued to grow during 2010, with market research showing solid recall rates for the new advertising and branding campaign. Of students surveyed, 66 percent were able to recall the ‘best of both worlds’ tagline in open-ended questioning.

The University’s first era of growth and development drew to a close in 2010, with the departure of its founding Vice-Chancellor, Professor Paul Thomas AM. 

He has been described by his peers as a passionate visionary, a leader of the highest integrity, and a skilled pioneer in regional higher education. 

With an impressive background of senior academic posts in the UK and Australia, he was elected in 1994 to champion the development of the first greenfield university in Australia for a quarter of a century.  

Professor Thomas worked tirelessly in the community for 17 years to inspire and persuade others to share his vision for an independent, sustainable, and regionally engaged university. 

Today the University of the Sunshine Coast is a dynamic centre of learning with more than 100 degree programs and the steepest student growth trajectory in Australia.  

The University enters a new phase of growth and development in 2011 under the leadership of Professor Greg Hill.

Growth and Development PERFORMANCE AGAINST TARGETS
1.1 Growth in EFTSL – Commonwealth Grant Scheme and fee-paying
TargetPerformance
5,000 EFTSL by 2010 6,016 EFTSL in 2010
10% increase in 2010 and 2011 13% increase projected for 2010 (within target)

The University achieved its target of 5,000 EFTSL in 2009, one year in advance. Current forecasts indicate that 2010 EFTSL will reach 6,016.

Continued strong growth in Commonwealth-supported load has contributed to the achievement of this target and current estimates for 2010 indicate a 12.8% increase in EFTSL over 2009 with CGS EFTSL projected to increase by 15.3%. At present, International and Fee Paying Domestic EFTSL in 2010 shows small increases over 2009.

Note for 1.1:

2010 estimates based on extrapolation of Census 1 & 2, 2010 data undertaken in September 2010.

CGS EFTSL includes Enabling, TPP, Undergraduate and Postgraduate

International EFTSL includes International on campus, online and off campus EFTSL.

Fee Paying domestic EFTSL includes Postgraduate, HDR, Headstart and Visiting domestic fee paying EFTSL.

1.2 Achieving DEEWR-funded load
TargetPerformance
Meet DEEWR-funded load target for each year Surpassed DEEWR-funded load target of 4,337 EFTSL by 635 EFTSL in 2010

The DEEWR-funded EFTSL target was achieved in 2006, however in 2005, 2007 and 2008 the DEEWR target was not achieved.

The target for 2009 was achieved comfortably and current estimates indicate that the University will surpass by a substantial amount the DEEWR EFTSL target in 2010.

Note for 1.2:

2010 estimates based on extrapolation of Census 1 & 2, 2010 data undertaken in September 2010.

Includes CGS: UG, PG, Enabling and Tertiary Preparation Pathway

1.3 Operating Margin
TargetPerformance
2009 – 3% 2010 – 3.5%2 011 – (4% adjusted) The University recorded a 3% decrease in operating margin on the previous year.

The operating margin (operating profit as a proportion of total revenue) of 13% as at 31 December 2010 is a 3% decrease on 2009 margin of 16%.

The decrease on operating margin is reflective of the outflows of expenditure relating to grant revenue received in 2009 and revenues to be received in 2011. In addition, the 2010 outflows included more non-capitalised expenditure relevant to high capitalised expenditure in 2009.

1.4 Liquidity ratio
TargetPerformance
1.50:1 The University has achieved the target liquidity ratio in 2009 and 2010 (1.88 and 2.68 respectively).

The liquidity ratio (current assets over current liabilities) reflects the University’s ability to meet short term debts. The 31 December 2010 ratio of 2.68:1 is reflective of the cash reserves currently held by the University for strategic purposes. 

The current debt facilities of the University allow for an operating overdraft of $4 million (previously not drawn upon) and longer term debt facilities pre approved by Queensland Treasury Corporation (QTC).

1.5 Employment costs as a percentage of revenue
TargetPerformance
Less than 60% Employment costs were 52.8% of total revenue.

The 31 December 2010 employment costs as a percentage of total revenue result is 52.8%. Employment costs include associated fringe benefits tax and provisions for leave entitlements (long service leave and recreation leave). Total revenuei ncludes capital funding grants and donations (refer to KPI 1.3 on page 8) which reduces the employment costs as a percentage of revenue as a result.

1.6 Revenue by source categories
TargetPerformance
Reduce University’s economic dependency on Commonwealth Government funding to 70% of operating grant by 2010 79.1% economic dependency on Commonwealth Government funding in 2010.
Increase quantum of research and commercial revenue each year Recorded an increase in the value of consultancy and contracts over 2009.

Total revenue earned for the period ended 31 December 2010 was $121.1 million. Australian Government Grants include Commonwealth Government Support, HECS-HELP arrangements and other DEEWR operating funds. Student Fees and Charges include full-fee paying International Award and Non-Award students and associated administration charges. Consultancy and Contracts includes all research and non-research commercial funding. Other Revenue includes University donations and interest income.

The University continues to grow its research and consultancy contracts with non-government sources, however the receipt of grant income is spread over a three to five year period.The timing of receipt of income may distort the overall consultancy and contract revenue percentage in comparison to the total revenue.

The Australian Government Grants and the State and Local Government Grants include some contractual funding for research purposes which is independent to the general operating of the University.

The University continues to rely on Government support particularly in relation to capital infrastructure and general operating activities. Approximately 4% of Australian Government Grants received is allocated to funding the repayment of debt.

FORWARD PLANNING FOR 2011
  • Develop key performance indicators for the newly developed USC Strategic Plan.
  • Achieve projected growth in EFTSL, fee-paying domestic and fee-paying international student loads.
  • Achieve full accreditation for professional programs in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, and AACSB accreditation for the Faculty of Business.
  • Further develop corporate systems including PeopleSoft HR and Payroll, the Technology One Finance System, and the Student Information System to deliver the Graduation Statement, DEEWR reporting requirements, improvements to the enrolment interface and the integration of the Library system with student financials.
  • Extend brand awareness north of the Sunshine Coast region and continue to build on ‘the best of both worlds’ concept.

Learning and Teaching review

GOAL To provide an increasingly comprehensive range of programs that position students for success in the global economy and which are aligned to the University’s priorities

Continuing its success of 2009, the University was againr ecognised at a national level in 2010 for its quality of learning and teaching: 

USC was the only public university in Queensland to gain five stars for teaching quality and four stars for graduate satisfaction in the 2011 Good Universities Guide.

USC won six Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) citations for its outstanding academics and student experience programs.

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
School of Communication
School of Social Sciences

The Faculty recognised the long service of its Dean, Professor Pam Dyer, who announced her retirement in late 2010. A new Dean willbe appointed in 2011.

  • Undergraduate students 1,881 
  • Postgraduate students 67 
  • Research students 35 
  • Male:female 30%:70% 
  • Award Programs 51 

Achievements in 2010: 

  • Dr Phillip Ablett, Dr Lisa Chandler and Dr Debra Livingston received ALTC citations for academic excellence.
  • Bachelor of Social Science (Community Work) 2009 graduate, Tomas Passeggi, was awarded an honorary Senior Fellowship in recognition for significant contributions to the University’s social life.
  • Bachelor of Arts 2010 graduate, Michele Gilchrist, received the Faculty Medal for Arts and Social Sciences.
  • Bachelor of Regional and Urban Planning student, Michael Hanisch, was selected as one of 100 people from across Australia to attend the Brightest Young Minds (BYM) Foundation Summit, co-hosted by the University of Sydney and Google Australia.
  • Three journalism students were finalists in the Most Outstanding Journalism Student: Regional (All Media category), at the 2010 Queensland Clarion Awards, with Alice Campion taking home first prize.
  • Two graphic design students, David Dixon and Jane-Maree Vortman, received commendations in the national 2010 Southern Cross Package Design Awards.
  • The communications hub at USC, including a photographic studio, a sound booth, and a print newsroom where students produce the Sunshine Coast Daily’s weekly Junior Sports Supplement, was enhanced with the establishment of a television news studio.
  • Five new programs were approved for offer in 2011: Graduate Certificate in Futures Studies, Master of Regional and Urban Planning, Master of Social Work (Qualifying), Master of Counselling and Master of Counselling Practice.
Faculty of Business
  • Undergraduate students 1,263 
  • Postgraduate students 149 
  • Research students 23 
  • Male:female 49%:51% 
  • Award Programs 42 

Achievements in 2010: 

  • Senior Lecturer in Accounting, Dr Monte Wynder, received the Vice-Chancellor’s Medal for Learning and Teaching and was named Accounting / Finance Lecturer of the Year for Australia and New Zealand.
  • Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Business 2010 graduate, Elyse Wohling, received the Chancellor’s Medal.
  • Bachelor of Business 2010 graduate, Samantha Lillie, received the Faculty Medal for Business.
  • Bachelor of Business (Financial Planning) student, Glen Mahoney, finished in the top one percent of a national share trading competition run by J.P. Morgan.
  • More than 50 academic prizes, scholarships and bursaries were awarded to students at the annual Faculty of Business Awards and Prizes Ceremony.
  • One new program was approved for offer in 2011: Graduate Certificate in Business Research.
Faculty of Science, Health and Education
School of Health and Sport Sciences
School of Science and Education

The Faculty recognised the long service of its Dean, Professor Rod Simpson, who announced his retirement in late 2010. A new Deanwill be appointed in 2011.

  • Undergraduate students 2,556 
  • Postgraduate students 439 
  • Research students 82 
  • Male:female 31%:69% 
  • Award Programs 71 

Achievements in 2010: 

  • Professor Margaret McAllister, Professor Roger Hughes and Lily O’Hara received ALTC citations for academic excellence.
  • Lecturer in Education, Kylie Readman, received the Vice-Chancellor’s Medal for Learning and Teaching, while Associate Lecturer in Bioscience, Colleen Kneale, received the Vice-Chancellor’s Medal for Learning and Teaching (Sessional Staff).
  • Bachelor of Science (Microbiology and Biotechnology) 2010 graduate, Nicole Ertl, received the University Medal as the highest achieving undergraduate student, and the Faculty Medal for Science, Health and Education. 
  • Bachelor of Environmental Science student, Chelsea Hopkins-Allan, was selected as one of 100 people from across Australia to attend the Brightest Young Minds (BYM) Foundation Summit, co-hosted by the University of Sydney and Google Australia.
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours) student, Karina Hamilton, published her first scientific paper at age 19, with her Australian-first study of omega-3 fatty acids in fish oil supplements appearing in the national journal Nutrition & Dietetics.
  • An Australian-first undergraduate course in Clinical Trial Management for biomedical science students was offered in partnership with ARCS Australia.
  • Three new programs were approved for offer in 2011: Bachelor of Early Childhood Education, Master of Education and Master of TESOL Education.

Students in other programs

  • Cross-institutional enrolments 17 
  • International Inbound Exchange 35 
  • Integrated Learning Engineering 37 
  • International Foundation Pathway 7 
  • Study Abroad 278 
  • Tertiary Preparation Pathway 324 
  • Visiting (Headstart/Non Award) 83 

Figures as at Census 1.

Learning by doing

An integral part of the University’s approach to learning and teaching is work integrated learning—providing as much practical experience as possible to prepare students for success in their chosen career.

A record number of organisations (612, 42 more than in 2009) provided student placement opportunities as part of the Work Integrated Learning (WIL) program in 2010, and some of the activities are detailed below:

  • Regional and urban planning students conducted research into cyclists’ attitudes on the Sunshine Coast. Bike path commuters were surveyed and the findings compared to similar surveys conducted in 2009. The activity, supported by Sunshine Coast Council, emphasised the importance of obtaining good data for planning, and should result in strategies to improve bikeway infrastructure.
  • Eight students formed the 2010 USC team of SIFE (Students In Free Enterprise), doorknocking for food donations, planning a community garden, creating a breakfast club for children and holding a world record attempt at the “longest can-phone network”. The SIFE team won second place in the national finals in Melbourne. SIFE is a global non-profit organisation that presents students with the opportunity to put into practice elements of their degrees while networking with business, community and campus leaders.
  • A team of eight public relations students planned and organised an Operation Rescue event to generate awareness about the Sunshine Coast’s emergency services. Other teams of PR students staged a range of events around the coast for their event projects, including promoting Cystic Fibrosis Queensland at the Ladies’ Oaks Day Races at Corbould Park, planning the Sunshine Coast Regional Council’s “GreenJune” activities to encourage eco-friendly living, promoting the expansion of the Noosa Longweekend Festival’s activities into Caloundra, and creating the region’s inaugural Multicultural Awards for Excellence with the Sunshine Coast Community Cooperative.
  • More than 30 students formed a volunteer contingent behind the annual Sunshine Coast World Environment Day Festival, held at USC. Students studying social work, human services, health promotion and environmental science organised children’s activities, wildlife presentations, interactive displays and workshops.
  • Eight international marketing students were nominated for a state award for their projects to help a Caloundra pet food business expand into Europe. The three teams of students acted as export consultants and gained practical experience in applied marketing.
  • Two Master of Psychology students were hired to job-share a full-time vacancy after completing internships at the Gympie Mental Health Service.
  • Education students worked on two literacy initiatives. Students volunteered at Sunshine Coast libraries for the National Simultaneous Storytelling project, reading to primary school students to help boost literacy. Ninety students worked at Siena College, reading to Year 2 students and then assessing their reading ability.
  • Journalism students gained access to producing quality television news bulletins, with the opening of USC’s television studio on campus. Students broadcast stories online and are able to produce show reels of their work to display to prospective employers. As well as donating equipment, Seven Local News provides students with technical support on cameras and editing and presentation advice from professional newsreaders.
  • Three health promotion students conducted self-funded work placements in Cambodia, working to reduce illness among 400 villagers with an arsenic-tainted water supply. The students worked across cultural differences to help address health issues such as malaria, malnutrition and safe drinking water.
  • Two business students helped organise the Walk for Daniel, an annual event that raises child safety awareness for the Daniel Morcombe Foundation.
  • Around 100 advanced design students displayed their works at two exhibitions in the University Art Gallery. The exhibitions displayed portfolios of students about to embark on careers in graphic design, advertising, marketing, multimedia and communication.
  • Eight nursing science students and their lecturer spent Christmas caring for children with HIV/AIDS in Tanzania.
  • Nine Bachelor of Education (Primary) students went on a five-day bus excursion to rural towns like Goondiwindi, Inglewood, Texas, Yelarbon and Benarkin. The initiative was aimed at encouraging students to seek workplace learning placements in rural and remote locations away from the Sunshine Coast. The trip was supported by the Tim Fairfax Family Foundation, which supports the needs of communities in rural, remote and regional Australia.
Learning and teaching week

USC held its inaugural Learning and Teaching Week in 2010. There were more than 830 participant registrations for the 28 presentations, workshops and masterclasses on offer during the week. Professor Keithia Wilson, a former Australian University Teacher of the Year, was among national and international guests at the event, and discussed how to predict whether first-semester students are likely to succeed – and the implications for curricular practices.

Learning and Teaching Week also included the University’s fourth annual Indigenous Education Symposium (see also page 26), the Vice-Chancellor’s Learning and Teaching Colloquium, and the launch of the eLearning and Flexible Delivery Advancement Project (eLEAP). eLEAP will help build the capabilities of academics in the realm of eLearning, with a focus on transforming student learning outcomes and experiences.

Innovative learning

A total of 37 students engaged in internships or paid employment within the Innovation Centre and its tenant companies during the year, while a further 14 conducted applied research projects with Innovation Centre companies. Almost 80 students visited the business incubator and accelerator as part of a course field trip, while almost 800 students attended guest lectures by the Innovation Centre CEO and directors of tenant companies.

Learning and Teaching PERFORMANCE AGAINST TARGETS
2.1 Graduate satisfaction with educational experience as measured through Australian Graduate Survey (AGS)
TargetPerformance
Generic Skills – 70% Good Teaching – 65% Overall Satisfaction – 75% Generic Skills – 66% Good Teaching – 62%Overall Satisfaction – 69%
Achieve above the national average in each of the three core scales of the AGS Achieved above the national rate for 2009 AGS

Part A: In the Australian Graduate Survey, three core scales are used to assess Graduate Satisfaction: the Generic Skills Scale, the Good Teaching Scale and the Overall Satisfaction Index. The University reports on the performance for these scales as the percentage of respondents that ‘agree’ with the survey item. The most recent data available is sourced from the 2009 Australian Graduate Survey.

In comparison to 2008, the 2009 AGS shows a decline in the percentage of respondents that ‘agree’ with the items included in the Generic Skills Scale and the Overall Satisfaction Index, while the percent of agreement remained stable for the Good Teaching Scale. The 2009 target has not been achieved at the University level for any of the core scales. However, there are instances where the percentage of agreement at the faculty level is close to or has met the target.

Part B: Overall the University has again performed very strongly against the national average in the three core scales of the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) in 2009. During the period 2005 –2009, USC exceeded the national average in each year for each scale except in 2007 when the USC Overall Satisfaction percentage agreement fell slightly below (2%) the national average.

Note for 2.1:

Data reflects responses by students who completed their qualification in the year prior to the AGS survey year, i.e. data for the 2009 AGS reflects responses by students who completed their qualification in 2008.

2.2 Graduate outcomes as measured through the Australian Graduate Survey (AGS)
TargetPerformance
Improve annually the proportion of bachelor degree graduates in employment or further study 2009 result of 75% was below the 2008 result of 82%
Progress towards achievement of the national average for bachelor degree graduates in employment or further study 2009 result was below the national average of 85%

Part A: The graduate outcome measure represents a combination of the number of domestic graduates in their preferred mode of employment (full time/part time) plus the number of graduates in further full-time study and is reported for students who graduated with an award at a level of Pass Bachelor, Honours Bachelor, Graduate Bachelor or Undergraduate Diplomates.

At the University level for the period 2005 to 2009, the proportion of respondents in their preferred mode of employment or further full-time study has fluctuated between 75% to 82%.Graduate success rates in pursuing employment or further study peaked at a high of 82% in 2008 before dropping to 75% in 2009. Both the peak in 2008 and the subsequent trough in 2009 reflect respective periods of strong then weak economic climates.

Graduate Careers Australia (GCA) has reported on the apparent existence of an inverse relationship between full-time employment and full-time study with full-time study figures dropping as full-time employment figures rise.

Part B: The proportion of USC respondents in their preferred mode of employment or further full-time study over the period 2005 to 2009 has been lower than the comparable national figure. In 2008, the differential closed to just under 7%. However, the differential has widened to just over 9% in 2009.

Note for 2.2:

Data reflects outcomes of students who completed their qualification in the year prior to the AGS survey year, i.e. data for the 2009 AGS reflects outcomes of students who completed their qualification in 2008 

2.3 Student feedback on courses (SFC) and teaching (SFT)
TargetPerformance
Achieve overall average score of at least 4.0 on a 5.0 point scale for “Overall, I was satisfied with the quality of this course” Exception: Not assessed at the aggregated level in 2010 due to suspension of component of policy.
Achieve overall average score of at least 4.0 on a 5.0 point scale for “Overall, how would you rate the teaching of the lecturer/tutor in this course” Exception: Not assessed at the aggregated level in 2010 due to suspension of component of policy.

Effective February 2009 the University Council approved the suspension of those sections of the Program Review and Course Evaluation Policy that made the annual collection of student feedback on courses compulsory. This suspension was reflected in a drop in the number of courses evaluated during both Semester 1 and 2 2009. Despite the ongoing suspension of collection requirements into Semester 1 2010, the number of evaluations returned to previous levels in that semester. The suspension ceased on 30 September 2010, with the compulsory collection being reinstated effective Semester 2 2010. The second factor affecting the SFC time series data from Semester 1 2009 results from a review of the average score calculation. The revised method of calculating the average score has been used since Semester 1 2009.

The Student Feedback on Teaching target of at least an overall average score of four on a five-point scale has been met in each semester since 2007. The University Council approved suspension of those sections of the Evaluation and Improvement of Teaching Policy that made the annual collection of student feedback on teaching compulsory (effective Semester 1 2009 until Semester 1 2010), which did not appear to have an impact on the number of SFT evaluations conducted during those semesters.

2.4 Number of students undertaking programs in priority learning and teaching areas
TargetPerformance
Annual increase in number of students undertaking WIL Exception: Verification of WIL status of courses is continuing which has affected the reporting of this KPI
Annual increase in number of students undertaking a course from the suite of sustainability offerings In 2010 there was an increase of 54% on 2009 enrolments

Part A: It is intended that the Work Integrated Learning component of new courses will be captured at approval stage. This is likely to be fully implemented in 2011. In the interim, further identification and assessment of additional WIL courses has recently been completed and will be imported into the Student Information System in early 2011. An assessment of this KPI will be undertaken when all data has been verified.

Part B: The University commenced offering courses in sustainability in 2008. There are currently four courses available and the number of students continues to increase. Census 2, 2010 enrolments account for an additional 71 course enrolments, bringing the total number of students undertaking a sustainability course in 2010 to 186. This is an increase of 54% over 2009 enrolments.

Note for 2.4:

The three Tiers are described in the Work Integrated Learning Policy as:

Tier 1: Industry/Professional Placement tier: learning in the workplace. It is a generic term for all immersed work integrated learning situations. This includes internships, practicum’s and clinical placements.

Tier 2: Industry/Professional Component tier: applying theory to workplace practice. Courses with a workplace component are ‘applied learning’, as opposed to the immersed learning of the Industry/Professional Placement Tier. This includes applied research projects, industry projects, simulations and production workshops.

Tier 3: Industry/Professional Interaction tier: learning from industry experts. This includes field trips, industry visits, site visits, guest lectures and the Employability Program.

2.5 Uptake of transition programs by students

TargetPerformance
Annual increase in number of new enrolments in TPP 37% increase on new TPP enrolments

The Tertiary Preparation Pathway (TPP) is a program developed by the University to provide prospective students with an alternative entry pathway to tertiary study. A suite of TPP courses were offered for the first time in Semester 2 2006.

TPP enrolments have continued to increase each term. New enrolments for Semesters 1 and 2 2010 combined, achieved an increase of 37% when compared against the same period for 2009.

When comparing TPP new enrolments for Semester 2 2010 against Semester 2 2009, there was an increase of 41%.

New enrolments in the 2010 TPP Summer session have increased to 153 compared to 88 new enrolments in 2009 for the same period. This is an increase of 74% for 2010.

Note for 2.5:

Includes Domestic and International Tertiary Preparation Pathway (TPP) and International Foundation Pathway (IFP)

FORWARD PLANNING FOR 2011
  • Develop non-award courses in discipline areas of regional relevance, including tourism, property and human resource management.
  • Explore the introduction in 2012 of new programs in laboratory technology, speech pathology, community mental health, paramedic studies and sports medicine.
  • Increase the number of Global Opportunities Program participants accessing external scholarship and internal travel grant support, the latter to at least $3,000 per student.
  • Apply a targeted approach to the development and implementation of the University’s policy framework to facilitate accurate and timely review and revision of policies.
  • Review and update the Library Management System, and increase the number of online resources to improve access.

Research review

GOAL To concentrate the University’s research effort andachieve national and international distinction in ways that advance University priorities

The research efforts of academics and students are broad and varied, with sustainability and genecology the core research foci at USC. In 2010... 

USC scientists involved in research into the domestication of southern bluefin tuna at land-based hatcheries earned an Excellence in Innovation prize. The award was presented at the Cooperative Research Centre Association Conference in recognition of the outstanding innovation and commercial application of their research with South Australian company Clean Seas Tuna Ltd. Over the past three years the project has involved scientists from more than 15 institutes around the world and across Australia, including USC’s Professor in Aquaculture Biotechnology Abigail Elizur, Associate Professor in Aquaculture Genetics Wayne Knibb, Dr Peter Brooks and Daryle Sullivan.

Associate Professor Julie Matthews—Director of Research within the Faculty of Arts and Associate Director of the Sustainability Research Centre—was the sole Queensland member of a team that received a $226,000 Discovery grant from theAustralian Research Council. The three-year project will examine how the Ngarrindjeri people of South Australia’s Lower Murray River and Coorong areas negotiate issues with the local, state and Federal Governments, post-apology. Discovery grants are awarded to fundamental, innovative projects, providing support for stand-alone research.

Associate Professor David Lee secured a $300,000 Federal Government grant to assess how hardwood trees can be better used to combat climate change. The collaborative project, involving USC, CSIRO PlantIndustries and Agri-Science Queensland, establishes Dr Lee’s Forestry Adaptation and Sequestration Alliance as a major tropical forestry research provider.

Professor Helen Wallace, Associate Professor Jennifer Carter and Professor Steven Underhill became involved in a $10 million Australian project to boost agribusiness in Pacific island countries. The team will help deliver the Pacific Agribusiness Research For Development Initiative, investigating ways of creating high-value products from canarium, a local tree nut, and local timber such as whitewood and teak. USC was one of four Australian universities commissioned by the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research for the project.

Sports scientist Professor Brendan Burkett was invited to present his research paper examining technology and human performance during the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics season. Professor Burkett, himself a former Paralympic champion, addressed the symposium at the University of British Columbia, discussing the findings of his research into assisting the performance of elite disabled athletes via the use of prosthetics and wheelchair technology.

Head of USC’s School of Health and Sport Sciences, Professor John Lowe, became the first Australian to receive the American Academy of Health Behaviour’s highest research honour. Professor Lowe won the annual Research Laureate, inrecognition of his 30 years of research into health behaviour. His keynote address, delivered at the Academy’s annual conference was published in the American Journal of Health Behaviour.

USC exercise physiologist Dr Chris Askew worked alongside world-leading exercise and muscle physiologists from the University of Copenhagen as part of a research group working to develop pain-free treatments for peripheral arterial disease. The team, and dozens of volunteer research subjects, assessed the potential of active and passive exercise in improving blood flow and increasing the growth of capillaries in the legs.

Master of Climate Change Adaptation student Riibeta Abeta presented research findings that aim to protect the remote Pacific Island nation of Kiribati from climate change-driven inundation. His thesis argued that Kiribati institutions had low adaptive capacity, and urgent measures were required to overcome socio-economic, bio-physical and technical barriers to adaptation.

USC and UQ received funding in 2010 to review the ALTC grants system. The research partnership examines the effectiveness of $13 million worth of federally-funded projects designed to higher education across the country since 2006. The ALTC promotes excellence in higher education by recognising, rewarding and supporting teachers and professional staff through awards, fellowships and grants. USC has previously received three ALTC grants for projects on mental health leadership, the whole of university experience, and offshore education.

Senior Lecturer in Nutrition and Dietetics Dr Fiona Pelly led a team of researchers in analysing the diets of athletes during the Commonwealth Games in Delhi. Dr Pelly and her team examined the dietary requirements of the athletes, with their work intended to assist caterers and organising committees of future major sporting events, including the London Olympics.

A five-year Census of Marine Life project led by USC researcher, Associate Professor Thomas Schlacher, raised concerns about the effects of sea-floor trawling on underwater mountains. The team measured seamounts off Tasmania and New Zealand that had barely regenerated during a five-year fishing closure. The CenSeam project findings were published in the journal Marine Ecology and presented by Dr Schlacher at a London conference.

PhD candidate, Michelle van Mulken, conducted Australian-first research aimed at helping pregnant women and new mothers become more physically active. The qualitative, longitudinal study involved collecting data from the same respondents over multiple time periods, and is intended to lead to new health promotion and intervention plans on the Sunshine Coast,such as improving local social networks for pregnant women.

Accelerated Honours Science student Karina Hamilton, who conducted an Australian-first study of omega-3 fatty acids in fish oil supplements, published her first scientific paper at age 19. The study was the first to compare the composition of omega-3 fatty acids in a range of oil supplements available in Australian supermarkets and pharmacies. The paper was published in September’s Nutrition & Dietetics journal.

Two honours students received $10,000 scholarships from the Australian Seafood Cooperative Research Centre (CRC) to study the nation’s prawn farming industry. Chelsey Parish investigated the export readiness of Australian prawn farmers, while Hannah O’Brien assessed the relationships and communication along the supply chain to local seafood outlets. The research projects will help boost the Australian prawn farming industry, which operates in a highly competitive global market.

The University’s water testing facility gained accreditation from the National Association of Testing Authorities (NATA). NATA reviewed USC’s Analytical Services at Sippy Downs and accredited the facility for both chemical testing and biological testing, making it the only dedicated NATA public water testing facility on the Sunshine Coast. See also page 7.

University research conference

The University Research Conference, themed around ‘Building research capacity’, attracted around 110 staff, Higher Degree by Research students and external guests. Inaugural Pro Vice-Chancellor(Research), Professor Roland De Marco, attended and shared his insights for building future research capacity at USC. USC research was showcased, ranging from fish consumption, midwifery and property development to public health, taxation and love-struck sea slugs. Workshops were also delivered to assist staff in boosting their chances of having papers published, developing research partnerships, and gaining grants. Additional workshops are scheduled for delivery in 2011.

The recipients of prizes for the best individual presentations at the University Research conference were:

  • Dr Scott Cummins – Best overall research presentation
  • Ms Gabrielle Parle and Dr Florin Oprescu – Early Career Researcher presentations
  • Maureen O’Neill – Poster
  • Pam Wardner – Three Minute Thesis competition
Research PERFORMANCE AGAINST TARGETS
3.1 Research publications
TargetPerformance
Annual increase in average HERDC publication points per T&R staff FTE Decrease in average publication points per FTE from 1.14 in 2008 to 0.95 in 2009
Annual increase in total publication points awarded by DEEWR in the HERDC Decrease in publication points from 196.74 in 2008 to 177.11 in 2009 Note: Publication points for 2010 are released in 2011

An annual increase in total and per FTE publication points was achieved in 2005 and 2006; however this was not maintained in 2007. The total weighted publication points showed a significant increase of about 60% from 2007 to 2008 which also provided an increase in per FTE publication points from 2007 to 2008.

In 2009 the total per FTE publication points declined by approximately 10%. The decline is largely a result of the number of books published in 2008 as compared with 2009. However, journal article publication points increased by approximately 7% from 2008 to 2009 which is a positive outcome.

3.2 Research income
TargetPerformance
Annual increase in average research income (HERDC data) per T&R staff FTE An increase of more than 10% in research income per T&R staff FTE
Annual increase in total research income (HERDC data) $3,383,427 – an increase of more than 10% on 2009

Research income from industry and competitive grants increased, while the amount of monies received from the public sector dropped slightly in 2009. Overall, total research income has increased annually since 2005, from $0.7 million to more than $3.3 million in 2010.

The per T&R staff FTE research income increased to $18,069 in 2010 (from $16,360 in 2009).

Publications (weighted) 2005 20061 2007 2008 2009
Books 7.5 25 7.5 30 15
Chapters 7.03 15.46 15.59 20.81 16.54
Journal Articles 41.41 58.1 79.24 100.19 107.08
Conference Publications 31.63 30.08 18.62 45.74 38.49
Total 87.57 128.64 120.96 196.74 177.11
Per FTE 0.83 1.05 0.84 1.14 0.95

Summarised above are total publication points (weighted) for each publication category; and publication points (weighted) per full-time equivalent (FTE) academic staff member (including adjuncts).

3.3 Number of completing higher degree by research (HDR) students
TargetPerformance
Increase the number of HDR students completing a HDR award each year Increase from 10 completions in 2008 to 25 in 2009

The number of HDR completions increased by 150%, from 10 to 25 completions, between 2008 and 2009. For 2010 to date, seven HDR awards have been completed.

A further 22 theses are under examination at the time of this report. Assessment will be made when final data is reported to DEEWR in April 2011.

Note for 3.3:

Official HDR completion data as reported to the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) in the Past Course Completions File at 30 April each year.

For 2010 to date, 15 HDRs have been awarded. A further 22 theses are under examination at the time of this report.

FORWARD PLANNING FOR 2011
  • Improve research performance by developing new research groups in genecology and regional sustainability and by developing a new health research centre.
  • Promote the intellectual and research skills within the Faculty of Business by increasing the number of research collaborations and affiliations with internal, national and international researchers.
  • Work towards bringing the Research Management and Training Plan into alignment with the new University Strategic Plan.
  • Plan and implement the establishment of the Centre for Leadership in Research Development.
  • Identify prospects and cultivate relationships with the potential to support research at the University, and continue to develop and maintain partnerships with credible international universities and organisations.

Regional Engagement review

GOAL To engage in productive partnerships to further the region’s interests and the University’s strategic priorities

In 2010, USC connected with...  

Business and industry

Business Professionals’ Forum: this series of forums continued for the second year, delivering three executive education and networking opportunities for Sunshine Coast business professionals.

A partnership between USC Faculty of Business, CPA Australia, and Institute of Chartered Accountants.

Enterprise Tuesday: six networking events for innovative ambitious businesses attracted more than 190 delegates to the Innovation Centre.

An Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast initiative, sponsored by Westpac.

Boardroom Briefings: eight informational events attracted 170 local business people to the Innovation Centre.

An Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast initiative, sponsored by Westpac.

Sunshine Coast Futures Conference: the inaugural ‘What Works’ conference brought together key regional stakeholders, University staff and professionals from a range of disciplines to discuss a sustainable future for the region. The conference linked sustainable property and job growth with research, education and training.

A joint initiative between USC and Sunshine Coast Council.

Permeable Pavements Seminar: an industry seminar on environmentally friendly permeable pavements attracted 30 local council people and around 60 other participants made up of local engineers, architects, builders, concrete manufacturers and USC engineering students.

A USC Engineering initiative.

Property Industry Professional Development Course: a one-day course addressing new risks and opportunities in the changing property sector was held in Hervey Bay.

A joint initiative of USC and the University of Southern Queensland.

Housing Choice Research Project: Sunshine Coast residents were invited to have their say on housing choices in the region through an online survey.

A collaborative venture between USC’s Project Management Centre, the Sunshine Coast Council’s Housing Affordability Taskforce, and Investa Property Group.

Environment and sustainability

Sunshine Coast World Environment Day Festival: the annual festival was attended by about 4,500 people, fostering environmental awareness and an understanding of local, regional and global imperatives insustainability.

Organised by USC, the Sunshine Coast Environment Council, SEQ Catchments and Sunshine Coast Council.

Ride2Work Day: held for the first time at USC, more than 150 people took part riding, walking, catching public transport or carpooling to work to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase healthy activity. Community stalls provided breakfast, bike accessories, prizes and information, while sport and exercise students performed exercise demonstrations. Sunshine Coast Council used the event as a platform to launch their road safety campaign, “Share with care”.

Organised by USC and Sunshine Coast Council.

Fraser Island: during 2010 a total of 470 staff and students from 12 regional high schools, 105 staff and students from USC, 335 staff and students from The University of Queensland, and 11 USC researchers used the Dilli Village facilities. The inclement weather during the usually busy periods of January and September resulted in a drop in guest numbers, with the total for the year being 11,217 bed nights (compared to 14,273 bed nights in 2009).

A USC Faculty of Science, Health and Education activity.

Urban development lectures: a Canadian urban development expert presented to USC staff and students on solutions to help both local communities access the benefits of globalisation, and global organisations engage in local communities and markets. USC also hosted a public lecture for a visiting academic to address the topic of public participation in town planning.

Initiatives of USC Regional Engagement and USC Urban Planning.

Arts and culture

Voices on the Coast Festival: the week-long event began with a youth literature festival at USC, bringing more than 4,500 children from 75 schools to the campus to meet and learn from top international and Australian authors, illustrators and poets. The festival celebrated its 15th anniversary in 2010.

A partnership between Immanuel Lutheran College and USC.

Language Immersion Day: around 400 school students came to campus for language immersion sessions in Japanese, Italian, Indonesian, German and French. The day is designed to further language skills and enable students to gain cultural knowledge by interacting with native speakers of the language.

A USC Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences initiative.

Australian Institute of Architects (AIA) National Tour: architects of USC’s Chancellery Building and University Club, Lindsay and Kerry Clare, included the University on their national tour of architecture talks as the recipients of the 2010 Gold Medal from the AIA.

Hosted by USC.

Reality Bites Festival: USC staff and students presented diverse topics at the non-fiction literary festival, including truth in literature, climate change and the early years of Crocodile Hunter Steve Irwin.

Supported by USC.

Australian String Quartet: for the eighth year the quartet included the University on their annual tour, playing to more than 250 people on campus. The event raised funds towards the University’s swimming pool.

University Art Gallery: the gallery attracted an impressive number of visitors for the year—13,363 people. Exhibitions featured works by contemporary Australian artists, USC students and travelling artistic showcases.

Youth and society

Blame their Brain: a professional development workshop on understanding the developing brain and how best to engage with young people as they learn and grow was so well received at Guidance Officer Day that Associate Professor Michael Nagel was invited to present at a number of schools and deliver a public lecture for the community. The public lecture was attended by more than 300 parents and educators.

A USC initiative.

Indigenous Education Symposium: the annual event involved industry, professional and community members attending workshops on reclamation of languages, anti-racism, teaching inclusively, success stories and culturally and linguistically diverse classrooms. The symposium facilitates understanding between Indigenous Australians and the broader community while addressing issues in Indigenous education.

A USC Buranga Centre initiative.

Community Collaborating Together Symposium: a one-day workshop was held on campus with the aim of helping individuals and organisations across the region develop greater collaborative skills. The event was open to community and cultural groups, government, education, business and industry, young people and the mature-aged.

Partnered by USC, Lifeline Community Care Queensland and STEPS.

Social science public lectures: a trio of social science and social work academics presented public lectures on campus: Professor Jim Ife spoke on rights, community and democracy, Professor Jan Fook spoke about ‘social work – what is it good for?’, and Professor Yoland Wadsworth spoke on human services practice-based research.

A USC Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences initiative.

Health and sport

Sunshine Coast University Hospital: USC continued to be represented on the project planning team and executive group for the Sunshine Coast University Hospital in 2010. Collaborative meetings between USC, the University of Queensland and Sunshine Coast Institute of TAFE advanced plans for the Skills and Academic Research Centre at the hospital. The centre will provide facilities for skills training, teaching and learning, and research. The centre is proposed to contain labs, mock wards/simulation spaces, tutorial rooms, lecture theatre, and more.

A USC collaboration with Queensland Health.

USC Sport: University and community usage of the Sports Precinct was strong in 2010. Weekly visits by community members numbered around 3,000, with around 850 weekly visits by USC students and staff. Thirty-six sporting groups used the indoor and outdoor sporting facilities. New activities for 2010 included a daily social sport program for students and staff, learn to surf lessons, first aid courses and a fun run to Mooloolaba.

A USC initiative.

Mental Health Summit: Australian of the Year, Professor Patrick McGorry, was the special guest speaker at the inaugural national Mental Health Summit held at USC. The two-day event was officially opened by Queensland’s Minister for Disability Services and Multiculural Affairs Annastacia Palaszczuk, and attracted hundreds of delegates from across the country.

Jointly organised by USC, Con Netica Consulting and Focus Personal Health and Therapy.

International Nurses Day: the bravery of nurses during World War I was the focus of USC’s annual celebration of International Nurses Day. Other activities included a parade of nursing uniforms from the past 125 years, tours of USC’s state-of-the-art teaching facilities, and the opportunity for participants to record their memories and aspirations about nursing.

A USC Nursing initiative.

Sunshine Coast Sports Hall of Fame: surf lifesaving champion Steven Short was inducted into the hall of fame for 2010, with certificates of merit awarded to William (Bill) Haselden and Ashley Robinson. Located at the Health and Sport Centre, the hall of fame has recognised local high-achieving sports people since 1991.

A USC initiative.

Northern University Games: eighty-five athletes from USC competed against students from Queensland, northern New SouthWales, the Northern Territory and Samoa in basketball, netball, touch football, volleyball, Rugby League 7s and tennis. The USC teams earned four medals: second in women’s touch football, second in women’s volleyball, third in women’s netball, third in men’s Rugby 7s. See also page 27

A USC Sport initiative.

Schools

Headstart: 116 Year 11 and 12 students from around the Sunshine Coast region participated in the ALTC citation-winning program in 2010. Headstart gives senior school students the opportunity to study at university and get ahead on their degree studies before completing school.

A USC initiative.

Experience USC Day: more than 800 Year 9 and10 students from 20 Sunshine Coast schools attended the inaugural Experience USC Day to explore career opportunities. With a choice of 25 workshops, the day was designed to give students an insight into industries, jobs and how they can achieve their goals.

A USC initiative.

Sunshine Coast Science and Engineering Challenge: held at USC for the first time in 2010, the event attracted 500 students from 16 regional schools (compared with 250 participants in 2009), encouraging them to study maths and science.

Hosted by USC.

ARTIE (Achieving Results Through Indigenous Education) program: around 30 USC education students were involved in the new program at Kawana Waters State College. A joint program of FOGS (Former Origin Greats) and the Federal Department of Employment, Education and Workplace Relations, ARTIE is designed to improve the educational attendance, engagement and outcomes of Indigenous students from Prep to Year 12.

A USC Education collaboration.

Primary Industry Centre for Science Education (PICSE) activities: USC science education staff devised a hands-on cheese-making assessment as part of an online teaching resource for schools produced by PICSE. USC also hosted the annual PICSE Science and Technology Expo, where more than 260 school students conducted experiments in the University’s science laboratories, and the USC Science Investigation Awards, where scientific research by almost 100 school students was judged for 25 awards totalling more than $4,200 in prizemoney.

PICSE is a national collaboration between universities, their regional communities and primary industries. USC is a financial partner.

Business Enterprise Day: more than 220 Year 10 students converged on campus to gain first-hand insight into the careers of leading local business people. Two dozen successful business people from diverse fields presented careers-oriented workshops to the students from eight Sunshine Coast schools.

A USC Faculty of Business initiative.

USC’s founding Vice-Chancellor, Professor Paul Thomas AM, outlined USC’s remarkable growth and development through difficult circumstances and its extensive contribution to the region’s economy, community life and preservation of the environment at a public lecture in June. It was his last opportunity to highlight USC’s progress and potential before he retired in July.

Engaging with future students

Recruitment efforts in 2010 included 140 visits to more than 76 schools, 12 career markets, three university roadshows and an information day for guidance officers. Seven information events held on campus saw student and staff ambassadors talking to an estimated 1,500 people about their study options at USC. Attendance rates were strong at the on-campus information events throughout the year, with Open Day attracting 4,100 visitors. A series of new information events were held in Toowoomba, Gympie and North Lakes (north of Brisbane).

Regional Engagement PERFORMANCE AGAINST TARGETS
4.1.1 Research and consultancy within the Region
TargetPerformance
Annual increase in percentage of research and consultancy income related to projects of regional relevance Increase from 51% in 2009 to 52% in 2010 in research and consultancy income related to projects of regional relevance

This data is based on the Higher Education Research Data Collection (HERDC) reported research projects and consultancy project information managed by the Office of Research with the income taken from data from Financial Services. The 2009 research data has been updated in line with audited HERDC reported income.

Regionally relevant income was identified as fulfilling one or more of the following three criteria:

  1. the project/consultancy was undertaken with a regional partner;
  2. the project/consultancy was based on the region; or
  3. the project/consultancy topic was relevant to the region.

Note for4.1.1:

The 2010 data is unaudited.

Regionally relevant projects identified as fulfilling one or more of three criteria as noted in the comments.

4.1.2 Learning and teaching within the Region
TargetPerformance
Increase the number of regional professions, businesses and industries in which students undertake WIL 612 regional professions, businesses and industries in which students undertook Work Integrated Learning (WIL)

For the subject reporting period, 612 regional industry and professional partners accepted students to undertake Work Integrated Learning (WIL) up from 570 in the previous reporting period.

Data on WIL placements is tracked manually, with datasets held separately within operational areas. Given that datasets were held separately, there is some potential for double counting of regional partners (e.g. where a partner takes WIL placements from more than one operational area) although this is likely to occur only occasionally.

4.1.3 Engagement focused on shared jointly-funded infrastructure
TargetPerformance
Annual increase in number and value of shared jointly funded infrastructure The number and value of shared jointly funded infrastructure remained at 2008 levels

The 11 joint infrastructure initiatives identified range from occupancy licenses (U3A) through joint investment/funding (ICT Building) to in-kind developments. It includes major projects (the stadium) and smaller initiatives (Alumni Way). All initiatives are on campus and totalled $11.36 million.

A commitment of $900,000 was secured from Queensland Sports and Recreation to construct a pool on campus. Australian and State Government funding totalling $3.6 million has been secured towards the construction of a child care centre. The centre will be run by the AEIOU Foundation providing 75 child care places, including 25 places for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Pervasive Developmental Delay (PDD).

4.1.4 Engagement focused on support to advance the knowledge economy
TargetPerformance
Annual increase in jobs and businesses created within the region 60% increase in the jobs created through the Innovation Centre within the region

There are currently 33 companies in the Innovation Centre (including ICSC Pty Ltd). Since 1 January 2010, five companies have vacated, two incubator clients have expanded into the Accelerator and nine new companies have moved in. This reflects 18.0% growth during 2010 so far. Overall occupancy of the Incubator is around 88%.

Overall occupancy of the Accelerator is around 97% although this includes an 18% space allocation for Big Ant, which has not been taken up.

During the same period, the number of people employed by client companies has increased from 110 to 176 reflecting growth of 60%. The Innovation Centre also hosts two USC research groups which are housed in the Accelerator and have a total of 22 staff.

This data reflects employment created directly through the operation of the Innovation Centre and associated business development programs. A survey of IC Client Companies highlighted very high educational levels, with 55% of staff having a graduate or postgraduate degree and an additional 9% currently completing a degree. In September 2010, the Innovation Centre will commence delivery of ENT321 New Venture operation as part of the Entrepreneurship minor. A ‘start up’ Studio Hot Desk space has also been established for students.

4.1.5 Engagement focused on support of the cultural enrichment of the community
TargetPerformance
Annual increase in the number of visitors from schools, TAFE and university staff and students and the broader community Visitors to the Gallery declined in 2010 when compared to 2009.

In 2010, there have been ten exhibitions held with 13,363 visitors.

From 2005 to 2009, visitor numbers have been consistently growing but have declined slightly 2010.

4.2 Number of graduating students employed in the region
TargetPerformance
Annual increase in number of graduates employed or self-employed in the region The number of graduates employed or self-employed in the region in 2010 increased from 262 to 290 in 2010.

The results presented are derived from the Australian Graduate Survey (AGS). The AGS is completed each year by graduates approximately four months after completing their qualification.

Data suggest the number of respondents who are locally-employed USC graduates has increased each year from 2005 to 2008, growing from 152 to 264 employed locally. The number of respondents who were locally-employed in 2009 fell slightly to 262, but resumed an upward trajectory in 2010 with 290 being locally-employed.

Note for 4.2:

Data is based on responses to the Australian Graduate Survey. Data is included if a student indicated as part of their response to the survey that they were employed or self employed (full-time or part-time) on the Sunshine Coast as at the survey reference date of 30 April for surveys prior to 2008. Commencing from 2008 the survey was conducted in two rounds with reference dates of 31 October and 30 April.

Data reflects outcomes of students who completed their qualification in the year prior to the AGS survey year, ie data for the 2010 AGS reflects outcomes of students who completed their qualification in 2009.

Achieving the target has been assessed by comparing the total number of students employed or self employed in the region each year.

Respondents employed in the region as a percentage of employed respondents who reported that they were permanent Australian residents.

FORWARD PLANNING FOR 2011
  • Broaden links with the Business Educators Association of Australia, to develop a range of targeted programs suiting the needs of teachers and students in the region.
  • Increase the percentage of research and consultancy income related to projects of regional relevance, through the promotion of partnerships, research and scholarly activity and initiatives contributing to regional sustainability.
  • Continued engagement with the Sunshine Coast Institute of TAFE, Global Village English College and Sunshine Coast Grammar School through expansion of the Study Sunshine Coast group to encompass other regional providers.
  • Identify and administer flexible entry pathways by increasing the number of articulation agreements with local providers.
  • Drive an increase in the number and value of shared jointly funded infrastructure, through collaboration with local, state and national organisations and parties.

Internationalisation review

GOAL To engage in international activities, including internationalisation of the curriculum, to heighten academic, economic, and cultural benefits for the region

Connecting with the world in an exchange of ideas, experiences, research and culture is important in higher education. In 2010, the University’s global outreach extended to many countries: 

Indonesia

Twenty teachers from the Indonesian province of Papua undertook placements at seven Sunshine Coast high schools as part of a unique, cross-cultural professional development project run by USC. It is one of the biggest projects of its kind in Australia, with financial backing from the Australian and Indonesian governments and strong support from local schools. USC received $538,000 in AusAID funding for the project through the Australian Leadership Award (ALA) Fellowship program.

In more Indonesian developments, USC’s International Projects Group received a grant of $309,000 from the National Asian Languages and Studies in Schools Program Strategic Collaboration and Partnership Fund (NALSSPA). This will fund a project to promote the teaching and learning of Indonesian in schools on the Sunshine Coast through the Headstart program and the Indonesian language courses offered by the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. The proposal also involves strategic partnerships with schools on the Coast in education of Indonesian and LOTE and in developing links between schools on the Coast and schools in Indonesia.

Germany

Seven USC students visited Juehnde, a German village of 800 residents who produce their own energy using crops and animal manure. The visit was part of a three-week course at the University of Kassel in January, organised through the Global Opportunities program. The students attended environmental engineering and German culture classes, which will contribute to their USC degrees.

South Korea

Bachelor of Arts graduate N.C. Prinsloo launched his government career in South Korea, on a 12-month contract in the Provincial Office of Education. His successful job application followed six months in South Korea studying at Kyungpook National University as part of the Global Opportunities program.

Holland

Third year journalism student Katie Fraser was one of five USC students to be awarded Education Australia Ltd scholarships, worth $25,000 in total. She spent six months studying at the Amsterdam campus of Inholland University. A Bachelor of Business (Marketing) student and Bachelor of Education/Bachelor of Arts student also received scholarships to study in Sweden and Denmark. Anders Lindgreen (Sweden) and Natalia Tintori Costa (Brazil) each received EAL Study in Australia scholarships.

South Africa

Two students were the first from USC to study in South Africa with funding from the Global Opportunities (GO) Program. Bachelor of Design student, Patrick Walsh spent a month with South Africa National Parks at Kruger, developing website pages, posters and brochures. Honours student Jennifer Castell spent six weeks at Rhodes University in Grahamstown on the south-eastern tip of South Africa undertaking research and assisting a leading environmental education expert. USC also hosted a visit from two key personnel from South African National Parks (SANParks) to develop environmental research and education links and deliver a public lecture.

Denmark

A former Danish national football player hosted a month of football activities for USC’s staff and students. Professor Jens Bangsbo is leading a collaborative research project between higher education institutions, hospitals and medical centres in Europe which has repeatedly shown the health benefits of regular football training, regardless of the skill level of the participant.

Cambodia

Three health promotion students undertook work placements in Cambodia to reduce illness among villagers with an arsenic-tainted watersupply. The students helped address health issues such as malaria, malnutrition and safe drinking water. (See also page 11.) USC also signed an agreement with the Kingdom of Cambodia’s Ministry of Tourism to help establish tourism educational institutions and plan strategic policies for sustainable tourism. (See also page 35.)

China

A USC researcher and sports coach travelled to China to help tackle health and fitness issues linked to growing wealth and western culture. Dr Mark McKean, a Post Doctoral Research Fellow heading USC’s Australian Institute of Fitness Research, presented at the 2010 Fitness China Convention in Beijing—the fourth time he had been invited to present his findings to the Chinese fitness industry.

USA

USC Adjunct Associate Professor Peter Rekers was invited to speak at the 2010US Federal Emergency Management Agency External Affairs Conference in Washington DC. Dr Rekers, a former Navy public information expert who served two tours in Iraq, teaches a crisis and issues management course to USC students. He spoke at the conference about developing accreditation for people working in crisis communications across government and industry.

USC also hosted two American academics whose pioneering scientific research and technology applications have been used in military and natural disaster situations. Professor Allan Falconer and Dr Alexander (Ted) Woodcock of the George Mason University in Virginia held workshops for staff and student workshops on topics such as fisheries and climate change, and presented a public lecture on Global Resource Management.

Top GO destinations in 2010
  1. United States
  2. Japan
  3. Germany
  4. Indonesia
  5. Denmark, Republic of Korea
International student profile
  • International students 870
  • Undergraduate and postgraduate coursework 526
  • Higher degree by research 21
  • Study Abroad 278
  • Exchange 35
  • Other pathways 10
Top student source countries in 2010
  1. Germany
  2. Canada
  3. USA
  4. France
  5. Norway
  6. Sweden

Figures as at Census 1.

International recognition

The University took part in a DEEWR-supported benchmarking survey designed to gauge the views and perceptions of international students about aspects of the overall student experience. USC rated highly in a number of areas in the i-Graduate International Student Barometer survey:

  • ranked second (of 29 Australian universities) for overall student satisfaction, with 89.7 percent of international students satisfied with the overall experience
  • ranked second for overall living experience, with a rating of 86 percent
  • ranked fourth for overall learning experience, with a rating of 86 percent
  • ranked second and third for language support and learning support, respectively
  • ranked first for students’ safety, with a 96.5 percent satisfaction rating
  • ranked first for friendships between both similar and different cultures

USC’s response rate of 46 percent from a population of 875 students exceeded the national average response rate of 26 percent.

Internationalisation PERFORMANCE AGAINST TARGETS
5.1 On-campus international student load
TargetPerformance
14.5% of on-campus EFTSL by 201115.0% of on-campus EFTSL by 2012 International on-campus (award level courses) EFTSL increased to 15.4% in 2009 and is estimated at 14.4% for 2010.

Estimates for 2010 indicate that international on-campus award EFTSL will comprise 14.4% of total on-campus EFTSL in award level courses. International on-campus EFTSL has more than doubled from 2005 to 2010 in award level courses from 337 EFTSL to 796 EFTSL. Whilst international on-campus EFTSL has increased substantially, domestic on-campus EFTSL in award level courses has also undergone significant growth, equivalent to a 83.8% increase over this period. Therefore, although international on-campus EFTSL continues to increase the forecast proportionate increase in domestic award level EFTSL is likely to be greater.

The impact of major increases in domestic load may make it increasingly difficult for this KPI target to be achieved.

Note for 5.1:

Estimates for 2010-2012 based on extrapolation of Census 1 & 2, 2010 data undertaken in September 2010. These estimates include inbound exchange students.

5.2 Participation in the Global Opportunities Program (GO)
TargetPerformance
8% of graduating students by 2011 Achieved 8.7% to date in 2010
Annual increase in number of participating students Increased from 68 in 2008 to 78 in 2010 (to date)

Part A: The proportion of graduates (domestic undergraduate) to have undertaken part of their program overseas has increased each year from 4% in 2005 to 9% in 2009 and met the required target in 2008 and 2009. Interim data for 2010 indicates a proportion of 8.7% of total graduates, meeting the 2011 required target.

Part B: The number of students undertaking part of their undergraduate program overseas has increased from 57 in 2005 to78 in 2010.

Overall student numbers continue to increase on previous years and enrolments in 2010 (up to and including Census 2, 2010) and potential enrolments in the 2010 Summer Session indicate a likely increase over 2009.

Note for 5.2:

Students included if they are a domestic Bachelor graduate, excluding Honours graduates.

Students included if they have undertaken overseas studies as part of either a formal exchange program or in-country language studies at anytime during their study.

Current enrolments based on Census 1 & 2, 2010 data and final data will be available following 2010 Summer Session

FORWARD PLANNING FOR 2011
  • Increase internationalisation of the curriculum, ensuring course materials utilise current international cases, examples and perspectives, and are aligned with international business needs.
  • Strengthen active staff involvement in teaching and research collaboration with USC international partner universities.
  • Develop and extend the network of international recruitment agencies and international partner institutions.
  • Work towards increasing the proportion of international on-campus students, and the number of domestic students undertaking part of their undergraduate studies overseas.
  • Strengthen international alumni networks to promote the University to prospective international students.

Student Support review

GOAL To set standards in student support which will help attract, support and retain students

In addition to being the only public university in Queensland to gain five stars for teaching quality and four stars for graduate satisfaction in the 2011 Good Universities Guide, the University’s efforts in social inclusion were recognised with four stars for both Indigenous participation and access by equity groups. Throughout 2010 the University continued work to enhance opportunities for participation in higher education. 

Financial support

Scholarships were presented to 55 talented first-year students during Orientation Week in February. The students, representing 38 different high schools and starting in a variety of USC degrees, received scholarships ranging in value from $3,500 to $12,000 (totalling $360,000).

Representatives of 33 local and national companies presented more than 50 academic prizes, scholarships and bursaries worth around $37,000 at the annual Faculty of Business Awards and Prizes ceremony. Prizes were awarded to outstanding students in particular subjects, as well as to overall outstanding students in particular majors.

USC held its first Engineering Awards Ceremony, at which two scholarships and two prizes were presented to engineering students by the donors.

Five bursaries totalling $5,000 were awarded to students by the Sunshine Coast branch of Graduate Women Queensland. The bursaries promote the advancement of women through education.

A number of awards were presented to students in memory of loved ones or colleagues at the Semester 2 Scholarships, Bursaries and Prizes Presentation Ceremony. Twenty-two high-achieving undergraduate students from all three faculties received awards totalling $14,500.

Scholarship donors presented 19 scholarships to high school students from across the regionat the annual Headstart Scholarships awards night. The scholarships recognise and reward the students’ efforts to further their education through the award-winning Headstart program for Year 11 and 12 students.

Emergency food relief was provided to more than 100 students. Rent increases, loss of casual work and injury, were stated as the primary causes of financial hardship. St Marks Anglican Church and Grace Christian Church supported the emergency food service with regular donations of non-perishable items.

Indigenous support

USC held its own Close the Gap Day in April to raise awareness of the national Indigenous health crisis. Aboriginal culture was celebrated through a number of activities, including Dreamtime dance and a documentary screening.

Nineteen Indigenous students graduated in 2010—the highest number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander USC graduates in one year.

Cultural issues were highlighted through the fourth Annual Indigenous Education Symposium held in August. Chair of the Queensland Indigenous Education Consultative Committee, Gina Archer, delivered the keynote address to community and staff about her experiences in education and inclusive teaching.

The Murri Pathways team (including USC, TAFE, Centrelink, and the Australian Defence Services) travelled to more than 20 schools from Redcliffe to Maryborough, providing information about higher education, training and career options.

An Indigenous Employment Coordinator commenced in the Buranga Centre, responsible for increasing employment of Indigenous staff on campus; promoting the national Indigenous Cadetship Support program to students; and mentoring of cadets.

Academic support

Enrolments in the Tertiary Preparation Pathway (TPP) increased further in 2010, surpassing the significant intakes in 2009. More than 867 students enrolled at USC using the pathway (compared to 601 in 2009). TPP classes were also taught at Caboolture, Gympie, Noosa and Nambour.

The Tertiary Enabling Program (TEP) continued to deliver academic support to students needing to brush up on study skills in areas such as mathematics, physics and biology. Around 550 students enrolled in TEP in 2010, a similar sized cohort to 2009 (around 560).

USC led an ALTC-funded project on retention, attrition, and learning and personal support. The research included surveying business students at USC, Griffith, Monash, Murdoch, UniSA and USQ. The results collected from USC students were used to assist in the creation of a USC action plan to address student attrition and improve retention.

Around 800 commencing students were matched with 100 student mentors during Orientation in Semesters 1 and 2. Student feedback highlighted the value of mentoring for networking, insights on how to survive the first few weeks, and making them feel welcome.

The University Skills in Community (USC) Course commenced at Maleny State High School. The six-week course addressed questions about academic requirements and study skills for adult learners thinking about returning to study or enrolling in higher education for the first time. Course content included time management, proof-reading and editing, academic writing and reading strategies.

The Library underwent renovations to increase the number of quiet study spaces for students. There are now 138 individual study spaces with access to wireless, as well as 33 computer workstations and printing and copying facilities.

Implementation commenced on a new student email system late in 2010, for use from Semester 1, 2011. The Live@edu email system offers students 10Gb of email storage; online document editing, sharing and storage; mobile synchronisation; and instant messaging. A new staff email solution will be implemented later in 2011.

Careers support

More than 800 students were able to discuss a range of career and employment issues and explore opportunities for practical industry experience at the annual Careers Fair on campus in March. Representatives from 26 local, national and government organisations attended.

Workshops were offered to develop the professional skills and experience of students taking peer leadership roles and participating in governance or advisory committees of the University.

Career Connection partnered with Caloundra, Maroochydore, Nambour and Noosa Libraries to present careers programs for youths aged 14 to18 years.

Students had access to a record number of placement opportunities with organisations in 2010. More than 600 businesses participated in the Work Integrated Learning (WIL) program, providing valuable workplace experience to prepare for their careers. See also page 11.

Social support

The UniClub opened as a social student space on campus.The facility hosted social events and activities throughout the year, with a kitchen, free tea and coffee making facilities, showers, study spaces, noticeboards, wireless internet and casual sports.

New student groups were formed: Agents of Change (social science); Migrant Women’s Support Group; USC-Eco (environment collective); Late Bloomers (mature age students); Sustainability in Style; Disability Access and Equity; and the International Student Association.

The USC chapter of the Golden Key International Honour Society attained gold status in recognition of the group’s dedication to community service and charity fundraising, literacy initiatives, personal development, general networking and collaboration with USC staff and other chapters.

The 2010 sporting achievements of USC students were recognised with the presentation of Half and Full Blue recognition, Sportsperson of the Year, USC Team of the Year and USC Green (service to sport) in October.

Around 30 students and staff participated in the inaugural 10km Books to Beach Fun Run from the campus to Mooloolaba, to celebrate the end of the academic year.

USC provided $5,000 funding to offset some of the expenses for 18 students to attend the Australian University Games in Perth. The students contested mixed touch and men’s basketball, with the touch team winning bronze. A large number of students also competed in the Northern University Games (see also page 19).

A child care centre on campus was announced in partnership with the AEIOU Foundation and supported by the State and Federal Governments. The centre is planned to open in mid-2011. See also page 7.

Wellbeing activities expanded, with smoking cessation classes, influenza vaccination clinics, and skin check clinics offered in 2010.

Supporting regional Queensland

In 2010 USC received funding from the Tim Fairfax Family Foundation for an educational road trip for its trainee teachers. The initiative encourages students to seek workplace learning placements in rural and remote locations away from the Sunshine Coast. (See also page 11.) A fourth-year Bachelor of Education / Bachelor of Science student also received a $10,000 Queensland Government scholarship to support her during her final year of study before heading off to teach in a rural Queensland school in 2011. Recipient Jemma Stevens aims to teach maths B and C, chemistry and physics in a remote town once she graduates.

Sport and Exercise Science student, Tommy Butterfield, was selected for the Australian Universities Rugby League (AURL) team to tour England and France in late 2010. Originally from Papua New Guinea, the Kippa-Ring resident plays hooker in the Redcliffe Dolphins’ Queensland Cup side. Tommy intends to use his USC degree to work in sporting development while pursuing his goal of playing NRL.

Clinical Exercise Science student Aaron Turner of Sippy Downs clinched victory in the ninth annual Great Court Race in July. Lene Knudsen of Denmark won the women’s event.

Student Support PERFORMANCE AGAINST TARGETS
6.1 Student feedback on Infrastructure and services as measured through Australian Graduate Survey (AGS)
TargetPerformance
Improve the annual percentage of Agreement responses on the AGS Student Support Scale Slight decrease from 57.8% to 57.5% in the 2009 AGS
Improve annual ranking relative to other Higher Education Providers for percentage of Agreement in the AGS Student Support Scale Ranked eighth place in the 2009 AGS down from sixth place in 2008

Part A: Graduate satisfaction in theStudent Support Scale has increased from 55.85% in 2005 to 57.45% in 2009. An annual increase was achieved in 2006 and 2008 while a slight decline appeared in 2007 and 2009. USC was above the national average for 2005, 2006 and 2008 and slightly below the national average in 2007 and 2009.

Part B: Inclusion of the Student Support Scale in the Course Experience Questionnaire is not compulsory. Therefore not all institutions include these questions in the questionnaire administered to their students. In 2005 and 2006, 11 (Table A) institutions provided results for the Student Support Scale, and this increased to 13 institutions in 2007, 2008 and 2009. USC’s annual ranking improved from 5th to 4th between 2005 and 2006; however it decreased to 6th in 2007 and 2008. In 2009, USC ranked 8th among the thirteen institutions measuring this scale.

Note for 6.1:

Combination of percentage of responses that Agree or Strongly Agree with the Student Support Scale items: I was able to access information technology resources when I needed them / Relevant learning resources were accessible when I needed them / Health, welfare and counselling services met my requirements / The library services were readily accessible / I was satisfied with the course and careers advice provided.

Data reflects responses by students who completed their qualification in the year prior to the AGS survey year, ie data for the 2009 AGS reflects responses by students who completed their qualification in 2008.

6.2 Participation and access rates for equity groups
TargetPerformance
Annual increase in the number of commencing Indigenous students Commencing indigenous student enrolments for 2010 (58) are currently below the 2009 rate of 67
Achieve National annual participation rates for equity groups Exceeded the 2009 national participation rates for Indigenous, regional, disability and low SES students
Achieve National annual access rates for equity groups Exceeded the 2009 national access rates for Indigenous, regional and disability students

Part A: New Indigenous student enrolments for 2010 decreased from 67 in 2009 to 58 in 2010. Student Life and Learning have advised this could be attributed to externally coordinated activities for the Murri Pathways program, being reduced in 2009. Conversely, the Murri Pathways program has been expanded this year to include the Fraser Coast region, so increased numbers of applicants from those areas in 2011 are expected.

Of the 58 indigenous enrolments, there were 26 enrolled in bachelor programs, 7 in postgraduate coursework, 1 in higher degree by research and 24 in non-award programs (predominantly Tertiary Preparation Pathway).

Part B: Participation rates are produced by DEEWR and are based on full year enrolment statistics. The participation rate shows the total number of students in each equity group as a percentage of all domestic students.

In the DEEWR figures released for the 2009 participation rates, USC exceeded the national rate in each of the equity groups. The 2009 USC participation rates for Indigenous students is 1.86%, compared to 1.35% nationally.The participation rate for students with a disability is 5.62% (nationally 4.27%) and students from regional areas is 28.43% (nationally 18.00%). The 2009 participation rate for students with a non-English speaking background is currently not available.

A new measure of low socio economic status (SES) is currently being developed by DEEWR. The Interim Indicator is derived from the number of domestic undergraduate students with home addresses in a Census Collection Districts that belong to the lowest SES quartile; and the number of students who meet relevant eligibility criteria on selected Centrelink Student Income Support payments. Based on this interim measure, the 2009 participation rate of USC students from low SES backgrounds was 17.85% which is above the national rate of 14.13%.

However when comparing the 2009 participation rate of low SES students using the previously determined DEEWR postcode measure (as measured for 2005 to 2008), USC was 11.43% which is below the national rate of 15.25% and lower than the 2008 rate of 12.50%.

Part C: Access rates are produced by DEEWR and are based on full year enrolment statistics. The access rate shows the number of commencing students in each equity group as a percentage of all commencing domestic students.

The 2009 USC access rates for Indigenous students (2.05%), students with a disability (5.06%) and students from regional areas (28.67%) exceed the access rates for all universities nationally (1.63%, 3.67% and 19.04% respectively).

Note for 6.2:

A student is defined as a new student if they have been admitted to the University for the first time; re-admitted into a new program following completion of a program, withdrawal, abandonment or exclusion; or when admitted to a new career (eg. from non award to undergraduate).

As per the DEEWR definition, only domestic students with a permanent home residence in Australia are included.

New enrolments up to and including Census 1 & 2, 2010

Non Award - includes those programs which do not lead to an award at this institution and are therefore not attributed to a Faculty. Includes: Cross Institution Enrolment, Visiting (Headstart), Visiting (Non Award), Tertiary Preparation Pathway

Latest national comparative data available is for 2009.

6.3 Undergraduate student progress rates
TargetPerformance
Improve annual undergraduate student progress rates Slight decrease from 84.7% in 2008 to 84.0% in 2009
Improve annual ranking relative to other Higher Education Providers for undergraduate student progress rates Ranked 28th out of 38 providers in 2008 and 36th in 2009

Part A: The progress rate is the value of successfully completed EFTSL as a percentage of all EFTSL attempted in any given year. In line with DEEWR procedure, progress rates are not calculated for enabling students due to the nature of their assessment. Undergraduate progress rates had improved each year from 2005 to 2008 however decreased slightly to84.0% in 2009.

Part B: The 2009 progress rate (most recent data) for all domestic and international students at USC was 79.0% compared to the national progress rate for all institutions of 85.5%. USC was ranked 36th out of 38 institutions, this was a decline on the previous year ranking of 28th.

Note for 6.3:

Level - UG: undergraduate- courses offered to undergraduate and honours students (does not include TPP). Most cross institutional, visiting, Study Abroad and Exchange students enrol in undergraduate courses.

6.4 Undergraduate student retention rates
TargetPerformance
Improve annual undergraduate attrition (inverse retention) rates An improvement from 25.2% to 23.9% in annual undergraduate attrition (inverse retention) rates for all students from 2009 to 2010
Improve annual ranking relative to other Higher Education Providers for retention of commencing students Improved ranking from 36th to 35th.

Part A: Attrition is calculated based on yearly enrolment data at Census 1 each year. The attrition rate is the proportion of students enrolled in one year that did not re-enrol at USC in the following year and did not graduate. The retention rate can be calculated by taking the direct inverse of the attrition rate.

The attrition rate for all domestic bachelor students for the 2009 to 2010 period was 23.9%. This result continues the steady improvement in attrition across the period since 2005 (30.4% for 2005 to 2006).

Similarly the attrition rates improved for new and continuing students:

The domestic Bachelor attrition rate for new students was 32.5% as compared to 34.0% for 2008 to 2009 and 40.1% in 2005 to 2006.

The domestic Bachelor attrition rate for continuing students was 19.1% as compared to 20.1% for 2008 to 2009 and 24.0% in 2005 to2006.

Part B: The most recently released national data is the 2008 attrition rates (i.e. comparing 2008 to 2009 enrolments). For commencing bachelor students at USC the attrition rate improved from 31.5% to 27.5% compared to the national attrition rate for all institutions of 15.7%. Of the 38 institutions, USC was ranked 35th improving on the previous year from 36th.

Note for 6.4:

A student is defined as a new student if they have been admitted to the University for the first time; re-admitted into a new program following completion of a program, withdrawal, abandonment or exclusion; or when admitted to a new career (e.g. from non award to undergraduate).

FORWARD PLANNING FOR 2011
  • Improve annual undergraduate attrition rates by continuing to identify and monitor at-risk students.
  • Improve the student experience and reduce manual efforts by streamlining student fee processes.
  • Review post-VSU service provision in collaboration with the Student Guild.
  • Upgrade the student computing environments including Office 2010 and finalise implementation of the new student email solution.
  • Implement student self-service functionality within the Student Information System to enable students to better manage enrolment-related matters.

Staff review

GOAL To attract, retain,develop and reward excellent staff

Staff awards and achievements in 2010

Professor Paul Thomas AM, Vice-Chancellor and President, received the Asia-Pacific Chief Executive Leadership Award by the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). The award recognises CASE member institutional heads, presidents, chancellors, system heads or other campus chief executive officers for outstanding efforts in promoting and supporting education and institutional advancement.

Professor Mike Hefferan, Pro Vice Chancellor (Regional Engagement), was the first academic to be elected as state president of the Australian Property Institute. The API has around 8,600 members nationally, mostly from private practice.

Professor John Lowe, Head of the School of Health and Sport Sciences, became the American Academy of Health Behaviour’s 2011 Research Laureate winner. The award recognises an outstanding individual who has had a substantial impact on health behaviour research. See also page 14.

Sports scientist and Paralympian, Professor Brendan Burkett, was appointed to the board of the Queensland Academy of Sport. The appointment builds on existing ties between USC and the Academy—in 2009 Professor Burkett was seconded as a senior researcher to the Centre of Excellence, and there are currently collaborative Australian Research Council grants on swimming technology and innovation.

Senior Lecturer in Accounting, Dr Monte Wynder, was named 2010 Pearson Accounting/Finance Lecturer of the Year for Australia and NewZ ealand at the Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand (AFAANZ) conference.

A business textbook co-authored by Associate Professor Kathy Lynch won its category of the 2010 Australian Educational Publishing Awards. Dr Lynch was the adapting author of Business Driven Information Systems, an expanded and updated version of the popular American business technology textbook.

Adjunct Professor Glen Wiggs received a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit medal for his services to advertising. The award recognised Mr Wiggs’ work from 1990 to 2004 as the founding executive of the Advertising Standards Authority, an independent, self-regulating system that deals with complaints about false, misleading and offensive advertising.

Dr Christian Jones secured a $200,000 grant for a research and development initiative for the new Sustainability Interpretive Centre at Sunshine Coast Institute of TAFE. As part of the project Dr Jones developed a multi-user interactive display wall.

Dr Jennifer Carter secured a $155,000 research grant for identifying the key social and economic factors for successful engagement in aquaculture ventures by Indigenous communities.

Professor Helen Wallace, Professor Steven Underhill and Dr Jennifer Carter secured $129,702 in funding for a research project exploring ways to boost agribusiness in Pacific island countries. The project was part of the Pacific Agribusiness Research For Development Initiative.

Human Resources successfully applied for five scholarships with the Australian Applied Management Colloquium’s In-House Scholarship Program. The intensive 20-week management development program is designed to equip managers with the insights, skills and confidence to accelerate their own development and team performance.

eLEAP fellowships were awarded to Dr Dawn Birch (Faculty of Business), Dr David McKay (Faculty of Science, Health and Education), Associate Professor Johanna Rosier (Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences) and Dr Jennifer Rowe (Faculty of Science, Health and Education). The eLEAP Fellowship Scheme is a USC initiative focused on transforming student learning outcomes and experiences by blending technology with teaching delivery. An eLeap interactivity expo was held for staff in August.

Adjunct professor and former Navy public information expert Dr Peter Rekers was invited to America to speak at a joint conference of their federal and state emergency management agencies in Washington in June. See also page 23.

Communications lecturer Greg Nash was invited to speak at the Noosa Longweekend Festival, a 10-day event incorporating theatre, literature, music, dance and film. Mr Nash’s presentation drew on his doctoral research, which focused on how science fiction relates to existing societies.

Academics Ross Watkins, Dr Clare Archer-Lean and Professor Ian Lowe joined several high-achieving USC students in presenting their work at literary festivals inBrisbane (Brisbane Writers Festival) and on the Sunshine Coast (Reality Bites Festival).

Associate Professor in Education, Dr Michael Nagel, co-authored his fourth book, Teaching: Making a Difference. The textbook is aimed at pre-service teachers.

Senior Lecturer in Art and Design, Kevin Todd, exhibited his work at Adelphi University art gallery in New York. The exhibition, ‘too perfect to be natural: paintings and computer generated forms’, showcased Mr Todd’s precise, geometric work.

Creative Writing professor Dr Gary Crew worked with Doctor of Creative Arts student Aaron Hill to produce an illustrated book for young adults. The book, Damon, was the second such collaboration between Dr Crew and Mr Hill. The first collaboration resulted in being shortlisted for the Crichton Award.

Associate Professor of Information Systems, Don Kerr, completed an 18 month project editing a 220-page text focused on minimising security threats while operating in the digital environment. The book, Digital Business Security Development: Management Technologies, is available internationally, with four of its nine chapters written by USC academics or postgraduate students.

Associate Professor Stephen Lamble and Dr Folker Hanusch published journalism texts through Palgrave Macmillan and Oxford University Press respectively.

Graduation awards

Vice-Chancellor’s Medal for Learning and Teaching 

  • Kylie Readman (Lecturer in Education)
  • Dr Monte Wynder (Senior Lecturer in Accounting)

Vice-Chancellor’s Medal for Research 

  • Professor Tim Smith (Director, Sustainability Research Centre)

Vice-Chancellor’s Medal for Engagement 

  • Dr Christian Jones (Senior Lecturer in Interactive Digital Media)

Vice-Chancellor’s Medal for Service 

  • Alicia Berneville-Claye (Print Supervisor, Mail and Print Services)

Vice-Chancellor’s Medal for Learning and Teaching—Sessional Staff 

  • Colleen Kneale (Sessional Tutor, Faculty of Science, Health and Education)
Appointments, promotions and retirements in 2010

Professor Greg Hill (Deputy Vice-Chancellor) was appointed the University’s new Vice-Chancellor and President in May. His term officially commenced in January 2011. See also page 38.

Two additions were made to Chancellery executive during the year: Professor Birgit Lohmann was appointed to the position of Deputy Vice-Chancellor, and Professor Roland De Marco was appointed to the newly-created position of Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research). Both took up their new roles early in 2011. See also page 38 and 39.

Brendan Burkett, Joanne Scott, Helen Wallace and Margaret McAllister started 2010 as professors, having gained promotion late in 2009. It was the first time that four academics received the promotion concurrently.

Professor Pam Dyer, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, and Professor Rod Simpson, Dean of the Faculty of Science, Health and Education, both announced their retirement in 2010. Professor Dyer started at the University when it opened in 1996, while Professor Simpson joined USC in 2001.

In 2010, 41 positions were reclassified, 28 staff commenced secondments, three staff were appointed to new positions and 33 staff received higher duties allowance.

Staff profile
  • Total staff 561 
  • T&R 210 (37%)
  • APT 351 (63%)
  • Full-time 486 (87%)
  • Part-time 75 (13%)
  • PhD 128 (79%)
  • Masters or higher degree 184 (56%)
  • Indigenous Australians 6 (1.1%)

All figures are FTE as at 31 March 2010 and exclude casuals.

The University won its sixth consecutive Employer of Choice for Women citation from the Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Agency (EOWA), in recognition of efforts to increase the representation of women at senior staff levels and to help staff maintain work/life balance. The University was one of 95 organisations nationally and 11 in Queensland to earn the citation.

USC was ranked the highest of any university in Australia for its opportunities for women in administration. An article in The Australian (published 17/11/2010) identified 63 percent of senior administrators at USC as women, placing USC well ahead of the next university with 53 percent.

Inresponse to recommendations arising from the Staff Climate Survey, Human Resources facilitated a series of three managers’ forums throughout the year. The department also developed secondment guidelines to aid career planning and provide more opportunities for staff progression, and extended reporting to include the number of internal staff appointments, secondments and higher duties allowances received.

Staff from Teaching and Research Services and Human Resources developed an online professional development tool, with the goal of helping teaching and research staff plan their work, careers and themselves, and then demonstrate their performance and achievements when seeking promotion, awards and grants.

Internal communication to staff was improved during the year with the introduction of the USC News for Staff email bulletin. Containing USC and university-sector news and developments, the monthly bulletin was regularly received by 94 percent of staff. A readership survey found that 61 percent of staff always read it, with 71 percent of those readers finding the information quite or very useful.

Education and awareness of equal opportunity in the workplace was heightened in 2010: harassment and discrimination sessions were conducted for staff; and University executive requested all staff to complete an online equal opportunity training package by the end of 2010.

ALTC citations

The University repeated 2009’s record six awards in the prestigious Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) citations:

  • Dr Phillip Ablett – For enlivening social theory to inspire students to become agents of change for a just, democratic and sustainable society.
  • Professor Margaret McAllister – For the creation and development of Solution Focused Nursing, an innovative and internationally-recognised model for student learning that develops high-level caring skills.
  • Ms Lily O’Hara – For passionate, enthusiastic and sustained commitment to inspiring and motivating health students to become expert and engaged practitioners.
  • Dr Lisa Chandler – For sustained design and delivery of innovative, practice-informed, and student-focused curricula that provide a professionally-relevant foundation in art and design practice.
  • Dr Debra Livingston – For empowering graphic design students by leading innovative and inspiring practicum experiences through integrating regional community and industry-based engagement into their lives and study.
  • Professor Roger Hughes – For scholarly leadership in the development of nutrition and dietetics curriculum, student learning and graduate outcomes, particularly in the area of public health nutrition.
Community contributions by staff in 2010

International Women’s Day was celebrated on campus for staff and students with a free breakfast and public lecture on “Feminism and Humour” by USC adjunct professor, Dr Ivana Milojevic.

Staff raised more than $500 for Australia’s Biggest Morning Tea. The funds raised were matched by the University to support the fight against cancer.

Around 20 staff lent their Christmas spirit to the Smith Family by volunteering to distribute gifts to needy Sunshine Coast families.

The annual Staff Appeal supported USC’s student scholarships and bursaries, campus enhancements, research and other initiatives. Staff donated more than $6,800 through payroll deductions, with 100 percent of the donation going directly to the support area nominated.

Staff PERFORMANCE AGAINST TARGETS
7.1 Staff profile
TargetPerformance
Equal to or above sector average Proportion of women in senior USC positions for 2010 is 35%. 2009 proportion of 39% is above the sector average of 35%.

The University has remained above the sector averages for senior female staff from 2007 to 2009. Data is at 31 March for each respective year and the most recently available sectoral data is for 2009.

Senior staff consists of APT staff above Level 10, T&R Staff above Level E and T&R staff at or below T&R Level E with formal management leadership responsibility.

This is benchmarked against Universities’ HR Benchmarking Program (QUT).

Note for 7.1:

2010 Universities’ HR Benchmarking Program (QUT) sector average not available until 2011

7.2 High qualifications profile
TargetPerformance
In each year 2005-2011 be in top quintile of Australian Higher Education Providers for percentage of T&R staff (FTE) with a Master or higher level degree The University returned to the top quintile in 2010
By 2011 be in top third of Australian Higher Education Providers for percentage of T&R staff (FTE) with a PhD Not yet assessed

The University has been in the top quintile of Australian Higher Education Providers for T&R staff (FTE) with a Master or higher level degree, based on available published data for 2005 to 2008.  In 2009, USC was above the sector average, however dropped outside the top fifth rankings. In 2010, USC remained above the sector average and returned to the top quintile of institutions within this category.

Similarly, the University remained in the top third of Australian Higher Education Providers for T&R staff (FTE) with a Doctor of Philosophy, based on available published data for 2005 to 2008. In 2009 and 2010, USC was equal to the sector average however dropped just outside the top third ranking within this category.

Note for 7.2:

Derived from published DEEWR Staff Tables at 31 March each year

7.3 Facilitate staff development activities that will increase the capacity and performance of our workforce
TargetPerformance
Implement programs for emerging academic and administrative leaders by end 2010 A number of programs have been implemented including scholarships, mentoring programs and middle management forums.
Full implementation of Communication policy by end 2010 The Internal Communication Strategy (ICS) has been implemented
Facilitate two forums per year on discrimination and harassment
Assess effectiveness of cultural awareness training by end 2010
Two forums were held on discrimination and harassment and cultural awareness in 2010

Part A: In late 2009, Human Resources successfully applied for four scholarships with the Australian Applied Management Colloquium’s Scholarship Program, an intensive management development program for front-line and middle managers.

In early 2010 HR sought nominations from Deans and Cost Centre Managers for staff to participate in the colloquium. The target was APT staff who supervise staff, are classified at Levels 6 to 8; have demonstrated potential to grow within, and are committed to, the University; will have opportunities to practise and apply what they learn through the colloquium and to have influence within the University/work area and be a role model/mentor. Four staff were selected and have commenced the scholarships. 

In 2009, Human Resources commenced the Head of Schools (HOS) Forums and Middle Management Forums to provide the opportunity to enhance leadership capacity. From 2010 the HOS forums were incorporated with the DVC’s Academic Managers Forum meetings. The three Middle Management Forums facilitated in 2010 covered “Managing Change Effectively” and “Having a Difficult Conversation – How to talk to a staff member about a performance issue”. The latter forum was so successful that a further forum, including supervisors, was held on this topic.

Part B: The implementation of the Internal Communication Strategy (ICS) is complete. PPR documentation is being provided to Human Resources and Human Resources Consultants and Advisors review PPR goals and training and development plans to ensure appropriateness and incorporation in training needs analysis for the whole of University. The uptake of PPR has improved and is helping with career planning and development.

Part C: Two staff awareness sessions on discrimination and harassment were conducted in October 2010. Formal feedback on the sessions was very positive. Staff have been e couraged to actively participate in making the University’s workplace free from discrimination and harassment and have been requested to complete EO Online training on Discrimination and Harassment before 10 January 2011.

FORWARD PLANNING FOR 2011
  • Recruit new staff in the areas of Nursing, Paramedic Science, Occupational Therapy, Sports Science and Exercise Physiology, Primary Education, Civil Engineering and Early Childhood.
  • Support staff to build collaborations with internal and external partners to enhance the sharing of knowledge and opportunities across research, teaching and administrative areas.
  • Review the functionality and effectiveness of the USC Portal, and develop an information management strategy that addresses factors including information creation, classification, storage, digital rights, retrieval, archiving and deletion.
  • Increase inbound and outbound staff mobility and increase opportunities for staff from international partner universities.
  • Encourage teaching and research staff to upgrade their qualifications through performance management and other programs, with the intention of improving PhD qualification ratios across all faculties.

Environmental Sustainability review

GOAL To continue to lead, by example, in the areas of campus planning and development, sub-tropical architecture and all operations that have environmental impact

Creating a more sustainable future: the University embarked on a range of sustainability projects in 2010: 

Traffic and transport

Priority T2 parking for those carpooling to campus was introduced at Orientation Week in July. The activity was well received by students as a means of reducing traffic on campus and rewarding those who carpool.

USC advanced its partnership with Translink and Sunshine Coast Regional Council to introduce a U-pass for subsidised public transport to campus. U-pass is an initiative implemented at Massey University in New Zealand, and will be a first for Australia when installed at USC in 2011. The scheme involves combining the Student ID Card and GO card (for public transport) into the one easy-access card, with the benefit of subsidised ticket fares for students.

For the first time, USC participated in national Ride2Work Day, encouraging people to walk, cycle, carpool or catch public transport to campus. More than 150 students and staff participated. See also page 18.

Resource consumption

Inline with the University’s Sustainability Policy, Mail and Print Services introduced printing devices across campus using Australian-made 80 percent recycled paper, replacing the current 10 percent recycled paper. Other paper-saving measures were also implemented.

The University participated in Earth Hour on Saturday 27 March, joining people and organisations around the world in turning off non-essential lights and electrical appliances to demonstrate a commitment to action on climate change.

The sewage system at the Fraser Island Research and Education Centre was upgraded and solar hot water installed for visitor use. Further savings in fuel consumption on site were planned in 2010, with installation of solar power in 2011.

Awareness and information

The engineering arm of the Faculty of Science, Health and Education held an industry seminar on environmentally friendly permeable pavements, attracting 30 local council representatives and around 60 others, being local engineers, architects, builders, concrete manufacturers and engineering students.

The University hosted the Civil Construction Industry Forum in February to assess changes to the engineering industry in becoming more environmentally sustainable. The forum brought together local professionals to discuss community needs and integration with USC’s engineering program to ensure graduates have appropriate skills. The forum was part of an engineering reform project funded by DEEWR and was sponsored by a local engineering firm.

An expert in the conservation of the Galapagos Islands presented a special public lecture on campus, focused on the work of the Galapagos Academic Institute for the Arts and Sciences (GAIAS), the institution’s work with WWF on climate change, and on sustainable ecotourism developments in the Galapagos.

The Sunshine Coast World Environment Day Festival was held on campus once again as a partnership between USC, Sunshine Coast Council, Sunshine Coast Environment Council and SEQ Catchments. The event’s 2010 theme was Biodiversity, in line with the United Nations’ focus on ‘Many species, one planet, one future’. See also page 18.

Teaching and research

A new academic appointment was made to coordinate postgraduate climate change programs. The role is responsible for promoting greater research opportunities for students, strengthening ties with USC’s research partners and contributing to a greater understanding of climate change adaptation.

USC signed an agreement with the Kingdom of Cambodia’s Ministry of Tourism to help establish tourism educational institutions and plan strategic policies for sustainable tourism. There is potential for USC to be closely involved in the sustainable master planning for tourism along Cambodia’s main coastline.

Research supported by the Campus Wildlife Fund made recommendations to broaden the‘dating pool’ of kangaroos on campus with kangaroos from other areas, to ensure genetic diversity in the breeding population. The research featured on the Network Ten television program, Totally Wild, in November.

For sustainability-related regional engagement activities, refer to page 14.

Best environment to think

The University increased promotion of its stance on sustainability in 2010. A new television commercial was created, focused on the University’s sustainability research efforts in climate change, forestry and aquaculture. Featured were six academics involved in projects including the use of world-leading bio-technology to speed the growth of the best carbon-absorbing hardwoods; the effects of climate change in our cities and regions; and the world-first spawning of captive southern bluefin tuna. Print advertisements were also created, referring to world-wide research that the natural environment can assist people’s ability to think. Hence, the natural settings on campus and around the Sunshine Coast make the Sunshine Coast not just a great place to live, but also the best place to think.

Environmental Sustainability PERFORMANCE AGAINST TARGETS
8.1 Proportion of expenditure allocated to environment sustainability
TargetPerformance
Increase proportion of capital expenditure allocated to sustainability initiatives In 2010 many projects of capital expenditure were allocated to sustainability initiatives

The proportion of capital expenditure allocated to sustainable initiatives was 26.7% for the period.

Sustainable projects carried out in relation to this KPI include Library refurbishments; water access upgrade; waste precinct creation; slashing and clearing; and water and power monitoring

8.2 Energy consumption
TargetPerformance
Maintain 0.55 GJ/m2 per annum (Part A): Achieved 0.53 GJ/m2 in 2010
Maintain 135 kg of CO² /m2 per annum (Part B): Achieved 133kg of CO2/m2 in 2010

Results for 2010 saw the University achieve both energy consumption targets, with power usage limited to 0.53 GJ/m2 and carbon emissions limited to 133kg of CO2/m2.

8.3 Water consumption
TargetPerformance
Maintain 5kL per EFTSL per year Since 2007 water consumption has remained below the target of 5kL per year per EFTSL

In 2009 the total water consumption per kL was 4.39/EFTSL, which is below the annual target of 5kLper EFTSL per year.

Note for 8.3:

For the 12 month period to June 2010.

FORWARD PLANNING FOR 2011
  • Promote the Public Place Recycling program on campus to see an annual increase in the volume of recyclables and a reduction in contamination levels to less than 15 percent.
  • Improve the University’s relative position in CAUDIT benchmarking through the implementation of the Green IT strategy, relating to the procurement, operations and disposal of IT equipment.
  • Bring about a 10 percent reduction in printery and stationery costs through the redesign of forms.
  • Maintain power usage and carbon emissions as outlined in the USC Strategic Plan (0.55 GJ/m2 and 135kg of CO2/m2 respectively per annum).
  • Maintain water usage of 5kL per EFTSL per annum as outlined in the USC Strategic Plan.

Governance

University leadership (principal officers)
Vice-Chancellor and President

University CEO, responsible to University Council forstrategic development, organisational leadership and day-to-day operations ofthe University

Professor Paul Thomas AM  

BSc(Hons), DipEd Wales, MA Lough., PhD Qld.,FACE, LRPS

Inaugural Vice-Chancellor of the University of theSunshine Coast since it opened on 1 January 1996. Planning President of the University 1994-1996. Member of University Council, Executive, Planning and Resources Committee, Foundation Board, Honorary Awards Committee, Senior Staff Advisory Committee, and Chair of the Board of Directors, Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast Pty Ltd. Previous posts include Head of Education at Kelvin Grove Campus of BCAE (later Queensland University of Technology), then Campus Principal and Professor within QUT. Prior to arriving in Australia, held senior posts in British higher education. Awarded a Centenary Medal for services to higher education in 2002 and on Australia Day 2007 was honoured with an Order of Australia medal (AM) for services to higher education and the establishment of the University of the Sunshine Coast. A Fellow of the Australian College of Educators and a recipient of a Rotary International Paul Harris Fellowship. Extensive experience on major committees, with research, publication, teaching and consultancy interests in management and leadership.

Professor Thomas completed his tenure as Vice-Chancellor in December 2010. The recruitment process for a new Vice-Chancellor and President commenced in December 2009, with the appointment of Professor Greg Hill announced in June 2010. Professor Hill became Vice-Chancellor and President Designate in June 2010. His term of office as Vice-Chancellor and President is to commence on 1 January 2011. 

Deputy Vice-Chancellor

Chair of Academic Board, overseeing the academic functions (learning, teaching and research) of the University, with responsibility for related support areas including Teaching and Research Services, Information Services, Student Administration and Student Life and Learning

Professor Greg Hill 

CertTeach, BA(Hons), PhD Qld.

Appointed Deputy Vice-Chancellor March 2005. Chairperson of Academic Board and member of University Council, Executive, Honorary Awards Committee, Senior Staff Advisory Committee, Equity Advisory Committee, Internationalisation Advisory Committee, and Co-Chair, Student Liaison Committee. Previously Foundation Professor of Tropical Environmental Science 1995-2004 and Dean 1997-2004, Charles Darwin University, establishing four University and national research centres. Reader in Geographical Sciences and Director of the ARC Key Centre in Land Information Studies 1979-1994, University of Queensland. Former Chair of Northern Territory Board of Studies. Former member of Kakadu National Park Research Advisory Committee. Research interests in remote sensing, wildlife ecology, resource management, environmental planning and education. Gained national recognition for teaching innovation and technology transfer to developing countries. Served on the AVCC Indigenous Advisory Committee.

With the appointment of Professor Greg Hill to the position of Vice-Chancellor and President, the recruitment process for a new Deputy Vice-Chancellor commenced in June 2010. Professor Robert Elliot acted in the position of Deputy Vice-Chancellor from June 2010 until December 2010, in addition to his duties as Pro Vice-Chancellor (International and Quality). The appointment of Professor Birgit Lohmann, previously Pro Vice-Chancellor (Learning and Quality) at the University of Adelaide, to the position was announced in September 2010, with her term of office to commence in early 2011.

Pro Vice-Chancellor (International and Quality)

Oversees, manages and advises on internationalisation, quality improvement, marketing and communication and the collection and analysis of strategic information

Professor Robert Elliot 

BA(Hons) NSW, MA La Trobe, DipEd Melb., PhD Qld.

Pro Vice-Chancellor (International and Quality) and Professor of Philosophy. A member of University Council and Chairperson of the Internationalisation Advisory Committee. A member of Academic Board and the Student Disciplinary and Student Grievance Appeals Committees. Former foundation Dean of Arts and subsequently Dean, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of the Sunshine Coast, from 1995 until 2005.

To reflect the University’s increasing focus on researchand research outcomes, a position of Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research) was created in June 2010. The recruitment process commenced in July 2010. The appointment of Professor Roland De Marco, previously Associate Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research Strategy and Development) at Curtin University, was announced in September 2010, with his term of office to commence in early 2011. 

Pro Vice-Chancellor (Corporate Services) and Chief Financial Officer

Oversees the University’s planning, budgeting, infrastructure, human resources, financial and information technology services and implements internal controls and risk management systems

Peter Sullivan 

BBus BCAE, FCPA

Appointed to the University in December 2007. Attends meetings of University Council, Planning and Resouces Committee, and Audit and Risk Management Committee. Previously Executive Director, Finance and Resource Planning, Queensland University of Technology. Experience in the higher education sector includes the integration of planning, budgeting, performance management and risk management frameworks in support of strategic planning and strategic financial management.

Pro Vice-Chancellor (Regional Engagement)

Oversees the University’s links with its primary stakeholders and its regional community in achieving the teaching and learning and research priorities of the University

Professor Mike Hefferan 

BAQld., GradDipMgmt C.Qld., MAppSci,PhD Qld.UT.

Pro Vice-Chancellor (Regional Engagement) and Professor of Property and Development. Appointed to the University in 2008. Member of Academic Board, Executive, and Chair of the Innovation Centre and Industry Advisory Group. Previously Director of the Institute for Sustainable Resources at the Queensland University of Technology. Currently State President of the Australian Property Institute(Queensland Division), a member of the API’s National Education Board, Chair of Technical and Standards Committee, Urban Development Institute of Australia and board member of the Sunshine Coast Business Council. Registered Urban and Rural Valuer, a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors, a member of the Property Council of Australia and the Urban Development Institute of Australia and Vice-President of the Australian Institute of Valuers.

University Council (governing body)

Under the University of the Sunshine Coast Act 1998, the University is governed by an 18-member Council representing University and community interests.

Council has the power to manage and control University affairs, property and finances, and appoint University staff. Where allowed under the Act, Council may delegate its powers to an appropriately qualified member of Council or member of the University’s staff; or to an appropriately qualified committee that includes one or more members of Council.

The Council met eight times in 2010.

Council leadership
Chancellor

Leads the Council and presides at Council meetings

John M Dobson OAM 

Elected Chancellor in March 2007for an inaugural term from 1 April 2007 to 31 March 2012. Member of the University Council since 1997. Parish Priest of Caloundra Parish since 1982, Dean of the North Coast Deanery within the Catholic Church since 1992. Contributions to the community include founding privately-funded residential care facilities for the aged and for people with intellectual disabilities; and co-founding a retirement village, a comprehensive college (in partnership with the United Church) and support groups for prisoners and their families.

Deputy Chancellor

Acts as Chancellor in the absence of the Chancellor or when the office of Chancellor is vacant

David Jeffries 

BCom Qld., FCA, FAICD, FFin

Elected Deputy Chancellor in February 2010 for an inaugural term from 15 February 2010 to 8 December 2013. Member of the University Council since August 2006. Member of the Foundation Board in 2008 and 2009. Elected Chair, Planning and Resources Committee of University Council in 2010, member of the committee since August 2006. Fellow, Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia, Australian Institute of Company Directors and Financial Services Institute of Australasia. Business interests include role as director for Village Life Ltd, Dole Australia Pty Ltd and RADA Pty Ltd.

Council membership

The Council comprises three official members, six members appointed by the Governor in Council, five elected members and four additional members appointed by the Council.

2010 was the first year of the sixth University Council. The term of office of the majority of members is four years. The term of office for student members is two years.

The Council membership for 2010 was as follows:

Chancellor John M Dobson OAM
Deputy Chancellor David Jeffries, BCom Qld., FCA, FAICD, FFin
Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Paul Thomas AM, BSc(Hons), DipEd Wales, MA Lough., PhD Qld., FACE, LRPS (to 11 June 2010)
Vice-Chancellor and President Designate Professor Greg Hill, CertTeach, BA(Hons), PhD Qld. (from 14 June 2010)
Chairperson of the Academic Board Professor Greg Hill, CertTeach, BA(Hons), PhD Qld. (Deputy Vice-Chancellor) (to 11 June 2010)
Professor Robert Elliot, BA(Hons) NSW, MA La Trobe, DipEd Melb., PhD Qld. (Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor)  (from 14 June 2010)
Six members appointed by the Governor in Council Dr Suzanne Innes, BA(Hons), BEdSt Qld., GradCertTESOL UNE, MSchM EdD C.Qld.
David Jeffries, BCom Qld., FCA, FAICD, FFinPaul Lunn, BBus S.Qld., FCPA, CA Affil.
Julie-Anne Mee, BBus C.Qld., MAdmin Griff., FCPA
Michael Williams
Jacquelyn Wright, BBus(Comp) NTU, Master of Computing Studies Deakin, GDipEd(Adult) S.Aust., GDipEd(Primary) NTU
Two elected members of the University’s academic staff Professor Rod Simpson, BSc(Hons), PhD Qld. (to 24 December 2010)Dr
Donna Weeks, BA(Hons) Griff., MIRAP Qld., GradCertArtsEntMgt Deakin, PhD Qld.
One elected member of the University’s general staff Bruce Williams, BA(Hons) Sunshine Coast
Two elected members of the student body Fiona Finnegan
Samantha Hawthorne
Four additional members Phillip Harding (from 28 January 2010)
Natasha Read, BCom Griff., MBA Sunshine Coast, FAIM, GAICD (from 24 February 2010)
Bruce Cowley, BComn, LLB(Hons) Qld.
One position remained vacant in 2010

As this Council’s four-year term of office began on 8 December 2009, a Council retreat/induction session was held off campus over two days in March 2010. On this occasion, members of Council’s Committees who were not members of Council were also invited to attend on the second day of the retreat.

Council decisions in 2010
  • Elected David Jeffries as Deputy Chancellor for the term to 8 December 2013
  • Approved appointments to Council in accordance with the University of the Sunshine Coast Act 1998
  • Approved appointments and reappointments to Committees of Council
  • Approved amendment of the composition of the Audit and Risk Management Committee and the Planning and Resources Committee, and amendment of the composition and terms of reference of the Academic Board
  • Appointed Professor Greg Hill to the position of Vice-Chancellor and President from 1 January 2011, with Professor Hill to be Vice-Chancellor and President Designate from 14 June to 31 December 2010 following the departure from the University of Professor Paul Thomas AM
  • Approved the creation of the position of Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research), effective from 1 January 2011
  • Supported engagement in discussions concerning an extension of the University’s presence beyond the Sippy Downs campus
  • Noted Corporate Performance Reports against the KPIs in the University Strategic Plan in February, May, July, September and November 2010
  • Approved a revised Strategic Plan for 2011-2015 following a major review of the Plan
  • Approved a revised Internationalisation Plan 2010-2014
  • Approved a Strategic Asset Management Plan for 2011-2015
  • Noted December 2009 and June and October 2010 Budget Outcomes Reports
  • Approved the April and August reforecasts of the University’s consolidated Budget
  • Approved the 2011-2013 University Triennial Budget
  • Noted Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast Pty Ltd 2009 Annual Financial Statements, financial reports as at March, August and October 2010, and an ICSC Pty Ltd 2011 Budget, Strategic Business Plan, and Statement of Governance Principles
  • Approved changes to the membership of the ICSC Pty Ltd Board of Directors
  • Approved accreditation of the following new programs, having taken into account the Business Case for each program:
    • AR708 Master of Counselling
    • AR709 Master of Counselling Practice
    • AR704 Master of Regional and Urban Planning
    • AR707 Master of Social Work (Qualifying)
    • BU508 Graduate Certificate in Business Research
    • AR510 Graduate Certificate in Futures Studies
     
  • Supported the appointment of Tim Fairfax AM as the inaugural Patron of the University Foundation
  • Approved nominations for Honorary Awards of the University
  • Approved the construction of an Olympic Swimming Pool within the Sports Precinct as Stage 1 of an aquatic facility on campus
  • Approved the construction of a childcare centre on campus
  • Approved changed reporting lines for the Animal Ethics Committee and the Human Research Ethics Committee, which are now committees of the Academic Board
New policies

Council approved the following new policies:

  • Bachelor Honours Degree – Governing Policy
  • Human Research Ethics – Governing Policy
  • Intellectual Property – Governing Policy
  • Management of Contracts and Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) – Governing and Institutional Operating Policy
  • USC Delegations – Governing Policy
Amended policies

Council approved amendments to the following policies:

  • Records Management – Governing and Institutional Operating Policy
  • Honorary Awards – Governing Policy
  • Council also amended the Policies and Related Procedures Governing Policy to change the University’s policy framework. Policies are now classified as either governing, academic or managerial. New policies or amended policies approved after mid-June 2010 were classified or reclassified under the new policy framework.
Rescinded policies

Council rescinded its approval of the following policies:

  • Policy statement on the basis on which USC awards Graduate Certificates and Graduate Diplomas
  • Financial Delegations Policy
  • Human Resources Policy
  • Policy statement on Criteria for Review by the Human Research Ethics Committee

University committees

Academic Board

The University’s Academic Board was established under the University of the Sunshine Coast Act 1998 as the University’s senior academic body. Chaired by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor, its 29 members include:

  • Pro Vice-Chancellor (International and Quality)
  • Pro Vice-Chancellor (Regional Engagement)
  • faculty deans
  • chairs of Academic Board committees
  • heads of schools
  • two elected academic staff members from each faculty
  • three professors appointed by the Vice-Chancellor
  • four students
  • external representatives from a school and TAFE
  • other senior University staff

The role of Academic Board is to:

  • advise Council on teaching, scholarship and research matters concerning the University;
  • formulate proposals for academic policies of the University;
  • monitor the academic activities of the University’s faculties; and
  • promote and encourage scholarship and research at the University.

The terms of reference of Academic Board in 2010 were as follows:

  1. To advise Council on general education directions, policies and practices on teaching, research and scholarship, and facilitate development and innovation in these areas
  2. To approve and amend academic policy, on delegated authority of Council
  3. To recommend to Council on the University’s areas of study and research priorities
  4. To monitor the academic activities of the University’s faculties
  5. To develop and approve schemes for internal research grants
  6. To recommend to Council proposals that imply the entry by the University into a discipline not currently taught in the University and proposals relating to the offering of programs in existing disciplines but at a higher level
  7. To determine the accreditation of new programs in disciplines currently taught in the University
  8. To determine the outcomes of proposals to make major changes to existing programs and courses
  9. To determine the outcomes of proposals to discontinue courses and programs
  10. To approve the admission of students to awards offered by the University (removed in October 2010)
  11. To confer awards on the delegated authority of Council (this authority may be delegated to the Chairperson Academic Board)
  12. To determine the acceptance of scholarships, bursaries and prizes above the value of $15,000 per award
  13. To establish committees to advise the Board on relevant aspects of the Board’s functions
Academic Board decisions in 2010

Strategic decisions in 2010 included:

  • Approved the Research Management goals
  • Developed an implementation plan for the 2009 Evaluative Review of the Academic Board Report Recommendations with a view to the Academic Board Review working group monitoring the implementation of the recommendations and providing the Academic Board with regular progress reports throughout the implementation period
  • Approved the 2010 Research Degrees Committee goals
  • Recommended to Council that the proposed Internationalisation Plan 2010-2014 be approved
  • Recommended to Council that the proposed new composition and membership of the Academic Board and its standing committees be approved effective from 1 January 2011
  • Approved the  Research Graduate Attributes
  • Established a working group to be charged with responsibility for identifying strategies and mechanisms to ensure that the Board was aware of the cost implications of academic proposals
  • Approved recommendations contained in the report ‘Human Research Ethics at USC: facilitating reflective practice and research excellence - Blueprint for 2010-2015’ and associated implementation plan
  • Approved the draft Standing Orders of the Academic Board and its standing committees
  • Recommended to Council that it approve recommendations regarding proposed changes to the reporting requirements of the Human Research Ethics Committee and the Animal Ethics Committee
  • Approved the 2011 Research Degrees Committee strategic goals, subject to amendment of the goals in line with feedback received from members
  • The Chairperson of the Academic Board also approved by executive action minor amendments to Standing Orders of the Academic Board and its standing committees, and the changes to the Terms of Reference of Academic Board to reflect that the Board is no longer required to admit students to an award before an award may be conferred.

Policy and procedure developments in 2010 included:

  • Recommended to Council changes to the Program Review and Course Evaluation policy, Evaluation of Improvement of Teaching Policy including:
    • the suspension of a requirement regarding the collection of student feedback
    • change to the approving authority
     
  • Recommended to Council approval of the new Bachelor Honours Degree—Governing Policy
  • Approved the new Australian Learning and Teaching Council Grants—Institutional Operating Policy
  • Recommended to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor approval of the Australian Learning and Teaching Council Grants Procedures
  • Approved the new External Research Grants—Institutional Operating Policy
  • Recommended to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor approval of the new External Research Grants—Procedures
  • Approved the new Postgraduate Programs and Awards—Institutional Operating Policy
  • Approved amendments to the Award of Deans Commendation – Institutional Operating Policy, including a change to the name of the policy to Award of Faculty Commendation for Academic Excellence—Institutional Operating Policy
  • Approved amendments to the Award of Distinguished Academic Record—Institutional Operating Policy, including a change to the name of the policy to Award of University Commendation for Academic Excellence
  • Approved the new Award of a University Commendation for Academic Excellence (Postgraduate Coursework Study)—Institutional Operating Policy
  • Recommended to Council approval of the new Intellectual Property—Governing Policy
  • Recommended to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor approval of the Student Grievance and Appeals Procedures and Guidelines for Staff
  • Recommended to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor approval of the Student Grievance and Appeals Procedures and Guidelines for Students
  • Approved the new Undergraduate Programs and Awards—Institutional Operating Policy
  • Recommended to Council the rescission of the Basis on which USC Awards Graduate Certificates and Graduate Diplomas Statement
  • Recommended to Council the rescission of the Rules Governing Undergraduate Honours Degrees to Council, subject to Council’s approval of the proposed Bachelor Honours Degree—Governing Policy
  • Approved recommendations regarding Distinctiveness in the Undergraduate Learning Experience
  • Approved changes to the Grades and Grade Point Average (GPA) Institutional Operating Policy, with immediate effect
  • Approved changes to the Undergraduate Programs and Awards – Institutional Operating Policy, with immediate effect
  • Approved the new Internal Learning and Teaching Grants Scheme policies and associated procedures and rescission of documents superseded by the new policies
  • Resolved to approve the Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) Awards—Academic Policy
  • Resolved to approve the draft Human Research Ethics—Academic Policy, subject to minor amendments

Academic Board accredited or recommended to Council the accreditation of the following programs in 2010, to be offered in 2011:

  • Master of TESOL Education
  • Bachelor of Early Childhood Education
  • Master of Education
  • Graduate Certificate in Futures Studies
  • Master of Regional and Urban Planning
  • Master of Counselling
  • Master of Social Work (Qualifying)
  • Master of Counselling Practice
  • Graduate Certificate in Business Research

The Board also:

  • Approved faculty requests for exemptions from compliance with Clause 9.4.3 governing study components in the Undergraduate Programs and Awards – Academic Policy
  • Approved the accreditation of the new program Bachelor of Commerce, effective from Semester 1, 2012
  • Academic Board approved the discontinuation of the following programs:
  • Bachelor of Social Science (Community Work)
  • Graduate Diploma in Special Education
  • Graduate Certificate in Professional Learning (TESOL)
  • Graduate Certificate in Special Education
  • Graduate Certificate in Mathematics Education
  • Graduate Certificate in Science Education (Physics)
  • Graduate Certificate in Science Education (Chemistry)
  • Master of Integrated Coastal Zone Management
  • Graduate Diploma in Integrated Coastal Zone Management
  • Graduate Certificate in Integrated Coastal Zone Management
  • Master of Environmental Change Management
  • Graduate Diploma in Environmental Change Management
  • Graduate Certificate in Environmental Change Management
  • Master of Professional Learning
  • Bachelor of Business (Human Resource Management)
  • Bachelor of Business (Information Systems)
  • Bachelor of Business (International Business)
  • Bachelor of Business (Management)
  • Bachelor of Business (Marketing)
  • Bachelor of Business (Tourism, Leisure and Event Management)
  • Bachelor of Commerce (Accounting)
  • Bachelor of Commerce (Financial Planning)

Additionally, in 2010 Academic Board approved the following:

  • 89 new courses (including 6 TEP courses)
  • the discontinuation of 42 courses (including 11 TEP courses)
  • several changes to programs
  • several new specialisations
  • adjustments to majors and minors and component courses
  • conferral of awards to students
Planning and Resources Committee

The role of the Planning and Resources Committee is to recommend the strategic directions of the University to Council, in the context of development of the University’s plans and their resourcing strategies. The Committee also provides advice to Council on issues arising from these plans. The key areas of concern to the Committee are Planning and Strategy, Financial Resources, Asset Management (including Information Technology), and Human Resources.

Members of the Planning and Resources Committee include the Chancellor, the Deputy Chancellor (who currently chairs the Committee), the Vice-Chancellor and President, one Dean or Director nominated by the Vice-Chancellor and appointed by University Council, and three external members with specific expertise in strategic financial management and planning, at least one of whom must be a University councillor. In 2010 there was a vacancy in the last-mentioned membership category pending discussions about the membership of Council and its committees overall.

The Deputy Vice-Chancellor and the Pro Vice-Chancellor (Corporate Services) and Chief Financial Officer attend meetings of the Committee and have participating, but not voting, rights.

Five regular meetings and one special meeting of the Planning and Resources Committee were held in 2010. Discussion focused on financial matters, budget reports, reports from the University’s controlled entity (Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast Pty Ltd), planning matters including reports on outcomes for the key performance indicators in the University Strategic Plan, and funding and progress of capital projects.

Recommendations to Council related to:

  • reforecasts of the University’s Consolidated Budget
  • reports from Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast Pty Ltd
  • construction of a childcare centre on campus
  • business cases for proposed new academic programs
  • revision of the Internationalisation Plan 2010-2014
  • major revision of the University Strategic Plan
  • the Strategic Asset Management Plan 2011-2015
  • the University’s Triennial Budget 2011-2013
Audit and Risk Management Committee

The Audit and Risk Management Committee (ARMC) has five major areas of responsibility:

  1. Monitoring internal control and risk management
  2. Monitoring of internal audit activities
  3. Monitoring of external audit activities
  4. Oversight and appraisal of financial reporting
  5. Oversight of any fraud or ethics issues

Membership consists of a minimum of four and a maximum of six persons, and includes the Chancellor ex officio and at least one other member of Council. At least one ARMC member must be a member of the professional accounting or audit bodies in Australia and have a professional accounting, management consultancy or audit background. At least one member should possess expertise within the education sector. Membership is approved by Council. The initial term of office of members is a period not exceeding three years, and may be extended for further terms subject to the composition and skill requirements of the Committee.

The Audit and Risk Management Committee’s activities in 2010 were in accordance with its terms of reference and had due regard to Queensland Treasury’s Audit Committee Guidelines. Four regular meetings and one special meeting of the ARMC were held in 2010. The Committee assessed reports on risk management, internal and external audit matters, and insurance, and the University’s 2009 Annual Financial Statements. The ARMC also conducted its annual self-evaluation.

The outcomes of the Committee’s discussions and advice to Council were provided to Council via the minutes of its meetings. The Committee recommended to Council in relation to a proposed change to its composition.

Honorary Awards Committee

The Chancellor chairs the six-member Honorary Awards Committee, which seeks, considers and recommends to Council nominations for honorary awards, in accordance with the University’s Honorary Awards – Governing Policy. In addition to the Chancellor, the Committee’s membership comprises the Vice-Chancellor and President, the Deputy Vice-Chancellor and three University Council members. The Committee met formally on two occasions in 2010 to consider honorary awards.

The following Honorary Awards were conferred in 2010:

  • three honorary Doctorates of the University, to –
    • Richard Woolcott AC, for his contributions to international diplomacy and leadership
    • Tim Fairfax AM, for his contributions to education, the arts and regional Australia
    • Hagen Stehr AO, for his contributions to sustainable fishing industries
     
  • four honorary Senior Fellowships of the University, to –
    • Christine and Bob Cameron, for their contributions to nationally significant business development on the Sunshine Coast
    • Tomas Passeggi, for his contributions to the social life of the University of the Sunshine Coast
    • Lyndon Davis, for his contributions to reconciliation within the University community
     
Foundation Board

The Foundation Board provides assistance to the Vice-Chancellor and President in relation to the operations of the University Foundation, which is the University’s fundraising and alumni relations arm. Foundation Board members include the Vice-Chancellor and President, two University Council members, and representatives of the Sunshine Coast community.

The Foundation Board met three times in 2010, and meetings of members of the Board were convened on two occasions. The following matters were considered at these meetings:

  • fundraising priorities
  • general fundraising matters
  • the membership of the Board and the possible appointment of one or more persons  to the Board
  • the appointment of the former Chairperson of the Foundation Board, Tim Fairfax AM, as the inaugural Foundation Patron
  • matters concerning the Alumni Relations Program

Monitoring quality

The University conducts internal audits within the relevant terms of reference and has due regard to Queensland Treasury’s Audit Committee Guidelines. The University monitors overall quality through a system of reports against performance indicators and planned targets, and scheduled regular reviews and internal audits of performance. The latter often include input from external sources.

The Council, committees and senior managers monitor quality, performance, standards and outcomes via performance reports and data, particularly in relation to the University’s finances, Strategic Plan and thematic functional plans such as those supporting learning and teaching, research and research training, and internationalisation.

Improvement plans are developed in response to review and audit findings and regular reports on progress in achieving those plans are provided to senior University staff and such bodies as the University Executive, Academic Board and Council committees.

In response to the report on the University’s first quality audit by the Australian Universities Quality Agency (AUQA), released in 2007, an Action Plan to address matters identified in the report was developed. Monitoring of implementation of the planned actions, with associated updates of progress reports in achieving the plan, continued throughout 2008, 2009 and 2010. Planning and consultation for the 2012 quality audit commenced in 2010. The audit will be conducted by the Australian Government’s new national regulatory and quality agency for higher education, the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA).

In 2010, major evaluative reviews were conducted for the following operational areas of the University:

  • Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
  • USC International
  • Human Resources
  • Marketing and Communications

Formal reviews of the following programs were also undertaken in 2010:

  • Bachelor of Business (Information Systems)
  • Bachelor of Information and Communications Technology
  • Bachelor of Software Engineering
  • Bachelor of Corporate and Public Affairs
  • Bachelor of Public Relations
  • Graduate Diploma in Public Relations
  • Graduate Certificate in Public Relations
  • Graduate Diploma in Education
  • Graduate Certificate in Professional Learning
  • Graduate Certificate in Early Phase of Learning
  • Graduate Certificate in Vocational Education and Training

The quality system is published online at www.usc.edu.au/quality

Benchmarking

During 2010 an initial inventory of benchmarking activities at the University was undertaken in preparation for production of a first annual internal report on the University’s benchmarking activities. The annual inventories and associated reports will be used from 2011 as springboards for promoting, improving and increasing the range of University benchmarking activities as part of continuous quality monitoring and improvement processes.

Controlled entities

Council approved a Policy for the Establishment and Operation of Controlled Entities in December 2006.

Innovation Centre

The University established the Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast Pty Ltd (ICSC) on 26 October 2000, under the University of the Sunshine Coast Act 1998 Part 2(6). The company commenced trading in January 2002. The Chief Executive Officer of Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast (ICSC) Pty Ltd reports to the Board through the Chairman, the Vice-Chancellor of the University.

The company’s mission is to support the start-up and growth of knowledge-based businesses and to promote beneficial interaction between these businesses and the University.

ICSC operates a major office facility on the edge of campus. This includes an award-winning Business Incubator, aimed at start-up companies, and a Business Accelerator, providing next stage growth space for companies graduating from the Incubator and space for professional service firms.

The Business Incubator and Accelerator are the first two phases in the development of the Business and Technology Precinct at Sippy Downs which has the long-term potential to provide employment for 8,000-plus knowledge workers.

At the end of 2010, the Innovation Centre was home to 31 resident companies, five professional service firms with visiting offices, and five associate clients which are based in the wider region.

To date, the Innovation Centre has supported the start-up and growth of more than 79 businesses, principally in the digital, clean-tech and creative industry sectors. The Innovation Centre’s extensive program of business development and education events has attracted almost 5,000 delegates since 2002.

Activities in 2010

  • The UniConnect program built valuable connections between businesses based at the Innovation Centre and USC. Through the work of the UniConnect Student Ambassador (a current USC student) the following was achieved in 2010—
    • A total of 37 students engaged in internships or paid employment within the Innovation Centre and its tenant companies during the year
    • 14 students conducted course projects with tenant companies
    • 78 students visited the Innovation Centre as part of a course excursion 
    • 775 students experienced a guest lecture by the Innovation Centre CEO or by directors of tenant companies
     
  • The final capstone course (ENT321) of the entrepreneurship minor, led by the Faculty of Business and delivered by the Innovation Centre management team, commenced in Semester 2.
  • Sippy Downs was profiled as an ‘Innovation Hotspot’ in the July edition of CNBC Business, a European Business magazine with over 650,000 readers per month. This was the first time an Australian location was featured and the article highlighted the importance of the University and its Innovation Centre in boosting the creation of over 350 knowledge based jobs in over 60 businesses mainly in ICT, Cleantech and Creative Industry sectors.
  • Four free places were awarded to USC students to attend the Innovative Industries Conference and the Clean Futures Conference at the Innovation Centre. This provided students with the opportunity to gain practical insights, industry knowledge and network with local entrepreneurs, industry experts, business owners and managers.
  • The six Enterprise Tuesday business networking events (sponsored by Westpac) attracted a total of 196 attendees. The events are designed to encourage entrepreneurship, and are inspired by the University of Cambridge.
  • The Boardroom Briefings series (sponsored by Westpac) delivered in-depth information on topics relevant to company directors of start-up companies and aspiring entrepreneurs. Eight events attracted a total of 169 attendees.
  • The first annual Clean Futures Conference was held to support the growth of business in the clean technology sector (sponsored by Sunshine Coast Council). The conference attracted a total of 257 delegates over three events.

The Innovation Centre maintains an online presence atwww.innovation-centre.com.au

Statutory obligations

Ethical standards

In compliance with the Public Sector Ethics Act 1994, the University’s Code of Conduct defines acceptable conduct for those studying and working at the University. Guidance falls under five main headings:

  1. respect for the law and system of government
  2. respect for persons
  3. integrity
  4. diligence
  5. economy and efficiency

The Code of Conduct is published atwww.usc.edu.au/codeofconduct and on the USC Portal for staff and students to access.

Information privacy

In compliance with Queensland’s Information Privacy Act 2009, the University has an Information Privacy Policy. A privacy statement is provided on the University’s website and appropriate privacy statements are included on all University forms. The Information Privacy Policy is available at www.usc.edu.au/privacypolicy

Right to Information

In compliance with Queensland’s Right to Information Act 2009, the University has a Right to Information Policy. In compliance with the legislation, the University has a Publication Scheme on its website, setting out the classes of information publicly available. The Publication Scheme is available at www.usc.edu.au/rti

No formal Right to Information requests were received in 2010.

Whistleblowers

No actions, disclosures or complaints were made in 2010 under the Whistleblowers Protection Act 1994. Effective 1 July 2011, the Whistleblowers Protection Act 1994 has been repealed and replaced by the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2010.

Workforce planning, retention and turnover

As at 31 March 2010, the Full Time Equivalent (FTE) staffing was 684, inclusive of casual staff. This was a seven percent increase on 2009, with growth consistent with the University’s Workforce Planning process. The 2009 * staff retention rate was 91 percent. The 2009 separation rate was 9.23 percent, a decrease of two percent on 2008.

The Staff Plan (2009-2011) addresses the University’s strategies in planning, attracting, developing and retaining its workforce. In accordance with the Staff Plan (2009-2011), the University has a number of key policies and procedures related to workforce development and management, including provisions for work-life balance, such as flexible working hours and leave arrangements. The University also has a Certified Agreement (refer below).

These plans, policies, procedures and agreements can belocated at www.usc.edu.au/staff

Workplace health and safety

In 2009 *, USC average time lost to injury was 33 days per workers’ compensation incident, with a total of nine claims accepted during the year. Workplace health and safety audits of office spaces were conducted every three months—a full-time Workplace Health and Safety Officer was appointed in 2010 to improve service provision in this area.

* Due to DEEWR reporting deadlines, 2009 figures are themost recent available.

Retrenchments and voluntary early retirement

In 2010, no University positions were made redundant, and no offers of Voluntary Early Retirement were made.

Negotiations for a new enterprise agreement

Negotiations for the University’s fourth Certified Agreement commenced in April 2009 and continued on a regular basis throughout 2010. Although the agreement was not resolved during the year, the University made an administrative pay increase of four percent for all staff in January 2010. Negotiations will continue in 2011.

The current Certified Agreement is available at www.usc.edu.au/certifiedagreement

Corporate information systems and records management

The continuing development of the University’s corporate information systems included the following activities in 2010:

  • Student information (PeopleSoft Campus Community): application functionality was further developed across 2010
  • Human Resources/Payroll (PeopleSoft): application functionality was further developed in early 2010
  • Finance (Technology One): the application, implemented in 2009, was further developed with the rollout of budgeting and asset modules, with a post implementation review performed
  • Library (Virtua): upgraded in late 2010
  • Research management (ResearchMaster): additional modules implemented in 2010
  • Corporate website and content management (Ektron CMS): implemented in 2010 for release in early 2011
  • Career placement (SONIA): implementation completed in 2010
  • International relations (IRIS): redevelopment continued throughout 2010
  • Lecture recording and streaming system (Mediasite): extended and upgraded in 2010
  • Student email: replacement commenced late 2010 for release in early 2011
  • Directory services and identity management system (Novell): further functionality and automation of provisioning across 2010
  • PC availability system: developed and implemented in 2010
  • Student printing (Bear): upgraded and extended to include wireless printing in late 2010
  • Staff printing-on-demand (Bear): upgraded in late 2010
  • Case management system: implemented in late 2010
  • Student feedback system: solution selected in late 2010 for implementation in 2011
  • Curriculum management: requirements were identified for a proof of concept in 2011

Other significant systems within the University include:

  • Learning management (Blackboard learning and content management systems)
  • Records management (RecFind)
  • Research repository (VTLS Vital)
  • Timetabling (Celcat)
  • Telephone PABX (Nortel)
  • Donors, friends, alumni management (Raisers Edge)
  • Card access and control (Cardax)
  • Career guidance (CareerHub)
  • Capital asset maintenance (MEX)
  • Leisure management (Links)
  • Media content management (Cumulus)
  • Portal (Blackboard community system)

Under the Public Records Act 2002, the University archives full and accurate records of its activities. The University operates a decentralised corporate records management model, with faculties and cost centres responsible for the management of their records. A central Records Management Services unit provides University-wide support and advice. Records Liaison Officers have been appointed in each faculty/cost centre to manage their respective records. Internal audits are conducted on a rolling schedule to ensure appropriate records management and staff training is undertaken on a regular basis.

2010 International travel expenditure

EmployeePostionDestinationReason for TravelUSC $ CostContribution from other Agencies
Chancellory           
Elliot R, Professor Pro Vice-Chancellor, International & Quality Scandinavia International student affairs and marketing 11,394 0
Elliot R, Professor Pro Vice- Chancellor, International & Quality United States of America Conference presentation American Philosophical Association 11,058 0
Thomas P, Professor Vice-Chancellor & President Malaysia Attend CASE Conference and receive Leadership Award 8,159 0
Thomas P, Professor Vice-Chancellor & President United Kingdom Visit International contacts 18,950 0
Human Resources          
Nemeth J, Ms HR Consultant Spain ICED 2010 Conference 4,311 0
Wirgau K, Ms HR Consultant New Zealand TEFMA Workshop and AURIMS Conference 2,698 0
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences           
Bussey M, Mr Lecturer, History Taiwan Tamkang University Conference: Climate Change Futures and Curriculum Design Presentation 120 0
Carter J, Dr Associate Professor, Geography Fiji PARDI Workshop 1,258 0
Carter J, Dr Associate Professor, Geography Vanuatu Workshop 2,300 0
Carter J, Dr Associate Professor, Geography Vanuatu Workshop 3,611 0
Carter J, Dr Senior Lecturer, Geography New Zealand Australian Geographers Heads of Geography Department meeting 1,978 0
Chandler L, Dr Regional Engagement Coordinator United Kingdom and Turkey Conferences 5,371 0
Choong K, Mr Lecturer, Advertising New Zealand Attend and participate in Doctoral Colloquium 26-28/11 and present paper at ANZMAC 3,285 0
Corpe C, Mr Research Assistant United States of America Present paper and attend Conference at NAPAR 2,515 0
Dyer P, Professor Dean, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences Greece Attend 6th Annual International Conference on Tourism 6,241 0
Hanusch  F, Dr Lecturer, Journalism Singapore Attend and present International Communication Association 1,355 0
Hanusch  F, Dr Lecturer, Journalism Germany Attend and present at European Communication conference 4,172 0
Janzekovic J, Dr Lecturer, Politics & International Relations India Present paper and exhibit art work at International Conference in Design 3,401 4,650
Jones C, Dr Senior Lecturer, Interactive DigiMedia United Kingdom Present two papers at the British HCI Conference 4,247 0
Katsikitis M, Professor Professor, Psychology United States of America Network with staff from 4 US Universities 9,151 0
Lovell G, Dr Lecturer, Psychology United Kingdom Research paper submission 0 2,100
Mahnken P, Dr Lecturer, Indonesian Indonesia Invited speaker at KIPBIPA Conference 29 1,504
Matthews J, Dr Associate Professor and Director,Research Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences Sweden Attend 17th World Conference of Sociology 4,851 0
Matthews J, Dr Associate Professor and Director,Research Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences Japan Attend the Asian Conference on the Social Sciences 1,678 0
Matthews J, Dr Associate Professor and Director,Research Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences Taiwan Attend Tamkan Uni Foundation for Future Symposium on Global Transitions & Asia 123 1,551
Potter A, Ms Lecturer, Communication United States of America Awarded faculty fellowship at National Assoc TV Program 1,492 0
Potter A, Ms Lecturer, Communication Germany Engagement with international partner institution 2,212 0
Rosier J, Dr Associate Professor, Regional & Urban Planning New Zealand ANZAPS Conference and PIA/NZPI Congress 2,015  
Todd  K, Dr Senior Lecturer, Design India Present paper and exhibit art work at International Conference in Design 1,993 1,018
Todd K, Dr Senior Lecturer, Design United States of America Exhibition set up and lecture at Adelphi University 2,111 0
Waluyo U, Mr International Project Officer, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences Indonesia PHD Research - provide Professional Development 942 0
Weeks  D, Dr Lecturer, Japanese & International Relations United States of America Invited speaker at National Bureaus of Asia Research Inaugural Asia Policy Assessment 2,240 0
Weeks  D, Dr Lecturer, Japanese & International Relations Japan Daito Bunka University meetings and manuscript proposal 2,875 0
Faculty of Business           
Anwar S, Professor Professor , Financial Planning Hong Kong Presentation to 6th Annual Asia-Pacific Economics Association Conference 1,764 0
Anwar S, Professor Professor , Financial Planning Hong Kong Research and Data Collection 3,431 0
Baxter P, Dr Senior Lecturer,  Accounting New Zealand 2010 AFAANZ Conference 2,514 0
Birch D, Dr Senior Lecturer, Marketing New Zealand Present papers at ANZMC Conference 1,452 0
Cameron L, Ms Lecturer, International Business United Kingdom and France Visit to IUT du Limousine France (representing USC International Office) 7,777 0
Cradduck L, Ms Lecturer, Business Law New Zealand 16th Press conference 1,520 0
Craig J, Dr Senior Lecturer, HR Managment & Strategy United States of America AACSB 2010 International Conference 3,511 0
Craig J, Dr Senior Lecturer, HR Managment & Strategy India and China Represent Faculty at MBA Fairs in India and China 10,786 0
Douglas E, Professor Dean, Faculty of Business Thailand Teaching and Consulting 3,364 0
Douglas E, Professor Dean, Faculty of Business United States of America AACSB 2010 International Conference 3,504 0
Douglas E, Professor Dean, Faculty of Business Switzerland and Germany 2010 Bason College Entrepreneurship Research Conference/Partner Institutions in Germany 6,611 0
Farr-Wharton R, Dr Senior Lecturer, Innovation United Kingdom and Italy PDP leave 3,785 0
Fleischman D, Mr Sessional, Faculty of Business New Zealand ANZMAC 2010 - paper presentation 1,350 0
Freeman J, Dr Lecturer, International Business China Travel to China with students for Seafood CRC Research 1,948 0
Freeman J, Dr Lecturer, International Business Hong Kong and China ASE Project RS016 and Study Tour 3,539 0
Gadenne D, Professor Associate Dean, Faculty of Business New Zealand 2010 AFAANZ Conference 2,589 0
Gration D, Mr Teaching & Research Fellow United Kingdom Attend Global Events Congress IV 5,312 0
Hefferan M, Professor Professor, Property & Development & PVC, Regional Engagement New Zealand 16th Press conference 2,304 0
Kerr D, Dr Associate Professor, Information Systems Hong Kong Attend 4th International Conference of Operations and Supply Chain Management 2,346 0
Kerr D, Dr Associate Professor, Information Systems United States of America Decision Sciences Intsitute 41st Annual Meeting 3,498 0
Lawley M, Dr Associate Professor, Marketing Fiji Teaching trip to TPAF 1,683 0
Lawley M, Dr Associate Professor, Marketing New Zealand Attend ANZMAC 2010 2,254 0
Mayes G, Dr Lecturer, Tourism Fiji Masters Fiji Research Project 1,599 0
Mayes G, Dr Lecturer, Tourism Cambodia Build connections with Cambodian Ministry of Tourism 1,426 0
Raciti M, Dr Lecturer, Marketing New Zealand ANZMAC 2010 Conference 1,711 0
Ross S, Mr Senior Lecturer, Property New Zealand 16th Press conference 2,348 0
Sands J, Dr Associate Professor, Accounting New Zealand 2010 AFAANZ Conference 3,966 0
Sharma B, Dr Senior Lecturer, Management Greece 6th Annual Conference on Tourism 5,015 0
Spinks  W, Dr Lecturer, Martketing Europe Research 0 0
Wardner P, Ms Teaching & Research Fellow New Zealand 16th Press conference 1,855 0
Warnder P, Ms Teaching & Research Fellow United States of America and Canada Inspect recently completed university and health clusters 6,365 0
Worthington J, Ms Faculty Administration Manager Singapore Attend AACSB Business Accreditation Seminar 1,753 0
Worthington J, Ms Faculty Administration Manager United States of America AACSB 2010 International Conference 2,896 0
Wynder M, Dr Senior Lecturer, Accounting New Zealand 2010 AFAANZ Conference 2,256 0
Wynder M, Dr Senior Lecturer, Accounting Canada Paper presentation at University of Lethbridge Canada 4,008 0
Faculty of Science, Health and Education           
Allen B, Dr Senior Lecturer, Education Indonesia Attend ceremony for ALA Fellows and meeting with AusAID 2,444 0
Allen B, Dr Senior Lecturer, Education Indonesia Lecturing for West Papuan Teachers Salatiga 1,570 0
Ashford  G, Mr Environmental Economist North Korea and China Edit a state of the environment report and train in official Korean protocol 5,554 0
Askew C, Dr Senior Lecturer, Exercise Physiology Germany and Turkey Research Project work and Teaching at German Sport College and attend European College of Sports Science Conference in Turkey 5,638 0
Askew C, Dr Senior Lecturer, Exercise Physiology France Carry out research study as part of parabolic flight campaign 3,198 0
Barnes M, Dr Associate Professor, Nursing New Zealand Council of Deans of Nursing and Midwifery Meeting 1,033 0
Brierty R, Ms Project Assistant, IPG Indonesia Attend ceremony for ALA Fellows and meeting with AusAID 1,748 0
Burford S, Ms Manager International Projects Group Indonesia Memorandum of Understanding discussions with Satya Wacana University Salatiga 2,228 0
Burkett B, Professor Regional Engagement Coordinator Canada Invited Presenter for International Symposium “Peak Performance” at University of British Columbia 2,334 2,200
Burkett B, Professor Regional Engagement Coordinator United States of America Invited presenter for American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Conference 173 3,450
Burkett B, Professor Regional Engagement Coordinator Germany Meeting of International Paralympic Committee, Sport Science Committee 70 3,000
Bussey M, Dr Research Fellow & Lecturer, History Sweden and France Attend conference and meetings 6,686 0
Carey  M, Dr Lecturer, Education Indonesia Conduct short course with Papuan student alumni 3,078 0
Carter B, Dr Associate Professor, Heritage Resource Management Indonesia, Cambodia and Malaysia Cambodia and Malaysia Conference - Sustainable Eco Tourism 4,201 0
Carter B, Dr Associate Professor, Heritage Resource Management New Zealand EIANZ Conference 2,430 0
Dann C, Mr Lecturer, Professional Studies United States of America Space Camp 2,843 0
Elizur A, Professor Professor, Aquaculture Biotech United States of America and Canada World Aquaculture Conference 5,917 0
Elizur A, Professor Professor, Aquaculture Biotech Croatia Research work (field trials) 4,698 0
Elizur A, Professor Professor, Aquaculture Biotech China and Japan Marine Biotechnology Conference and Tuna Symposium 5,308 0
Fahey S, Dr Associate Professor, Coastal Zone & Environment New Zealand EIANZ Conference 3,177 0
Fraser P, Dr Lecturer, Primary Education & WPL Fiji Fiji Dreaming 1,986 0
Heck D, Dr Associate Professor, Science Education France Attend Symposium of the International Network for Reorientating Teacher Education towards Sustainability UNESCO 4,614 0
Hogan S, Ms Lecturer & Education & Graduate Diploma Coordinator Canada Recruitment 5,093 0
Hogan S, Ms Lecturer & Education & Graduate Diploma Coordinator Canada Recruitment 1,379 2,900
Hope J, Ms Lecturer, Health & Science United States of America Attend two international conferences and present 5 papers/ Panel sessions/Pre-post Conference meetings 0 2,015
Hughes R, Professor Proferssor, Public Health Nutrition Portugal Conference Attendance (Presentation), professional body executive and research meetings 5,024 0
Hunt  M, Dr Faculty Research Coordinator Fiji Attend meetings with PARDI 1,034 0
Hyde  M, Professor Professor, Education Indonesia Memorandum of Understanding discussions with Satya Wacana University Salatiga 2,718 0
Lee D, Dr Associate Professor, Plant Genetics New Caledonia Scoping visit of dryland plantation forestry potential for New Caledonia 2,412 0
Lowe  B, Ms Senior Lecturer, Education Fiji Fiji Dreaming 1,809 0
Lowe  B, Ms Senior Lecturer, Education United States of America Space Camp 3,337 0
Lowe J, Professor Head of School, Health & Sports Science Ukraine Research Collaboration Meeting 11,649 0
Lowe J, Professor Head of School, Health & Sports Science United States of America AAHB 10th Annual Scientific Meeting 6,038 0
Lowe J, Professor Head of School, Health & Sports Science United States of America APHA Annual Meeting and SOPHE 61st Annual Conference 26,680 0
Lowe J, Professor Head of School, Health & Sports Science United States of America Vienna Injury Trauma Centre Global Forum 13,712 0
Lowe J, Professor Head of School, Health & Sports Science Singapore, Vienna and United States of America III International Conference of Physical Education and Sports Science, Youth in Phys Ed and Sport and Exec Board 14,277 0
Lowe J, Professor Head of School, Health & Sports Science United States of America Meet with colleague Lawrence Green (University of California) 8,172 0
Mangoyana R, Mr Research Assistant Botswana Conference - IASTED International Conference 4,130 0
Marshall S, Dr Sessional, School of Science & Education United States of America Visit Muesums and Academy of Science 3,333 0
McAllister M, Professor Professor, Nursing United Kingdom, The Netherlands and France Presenting conferences and visiting scholar invitation at INHolland University, Amsterdam 6,323 2,260
McAllister M, Professor Professor, Nursing New Zealand Provide key note address at Whiteria Community Polytechnic 0 705
McAllister M, Professor Professor, Nursing United States of America Attend NLN/COD Meeting and NLN conference 1,610 0
McConnell J, Ms International Project Officer Indonesia Attend ceremony for ALA Fellows and meeting with AusAID 2,273 0
McKay D, Dr Senior Lecturer, Biotech United States of America International Conference on the First Year Experience 4,516 0
McKean M, Dr Postdoctoral Research Fellow China The National Occupational Fitness Instructor Exchange Conference 2010 0 1,512
Meyers N, Professor Head of School, School of Science & Education Indonesia Work on Memorandum of Understanding with the Govenor of Papua 3,583 0
Meyers N, Professor Post Doctorial Researcher Thailand Coastal Zone in the Asia Pacific Conference 2,846 0
Mosel Williams L, Dr Senior Lecturer, Nursing United States of America Attend Nursing Leadership Summit 0 2,230
Mosel Williams L, Dr Senior Lecturer, Nursing United States of America Present paper at Sigma Theta Tau International Conference 5,022 0
Nagel M, Dr Senior Lecturer, Education Canada Meetings with Representatives from Saskatchewan Teacher’s Federation and attend OME Conference 5,865 0
O’Hara L, Ms Lecturer, Public Health United States of America Attend NAAFA conference 3,782 0
Pelly F, Dr Senior Lecturer, Nutrition & Dietetics India 14th International Commonwealth International Sports Science Conference (Commonwealth Games) 170 2,711
Powell  M, Dr Sessional, Facul;ty Science Health & Education Indonesia Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation Annual Conference 810 0
Randall B, Mr Research Technician Papua New Guinea Research 3,491 0
Readman K, Ms Lecturer, Education Canada Recruitment 6,115 0
Robertson A, Ms International Projects Liaison Officer Indonesia Delivery of IELTS Preparation course 2,963 0
Rowe J, Dr Senior Lecturer, Nursing Republic of Ireland International Conference 2,738 0
Schlacher T, Dr Associate Professor, Marine Science Iceland  Deep-Sea Biology Symposium and Data Analysis Working Group Meeting 5,106 0
Schlacher T, Dr Associate Professor, Marine Science United States of America Conference 4,835 0
Shapcott A, Dr Senior Lecturer, Plant & Vegetation Ecology Indonesia Attending Assoc for Tropical Biology & Conservation Conference 1,178 0
Shimizu Y, Ms Sessional, Facul;ty Science Health & Education Indonesia Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation Annual Conference 588 0
Simpson R, Professor Dean, Faculty of Science Health and Education Italy Footprint Forum 2010 14,691 0
Slater G, Dr Senior Lecturer, Nutrition & Dietetics Hong Kong Coordinate Sports Nutrition Course for Hong Kong University 0 1,400
Slater G, Dr Senior Lecturer, Nutrition & Dietetics United States of America and Canada Professional development plus assistance at 3 day workshop 2,613 0
Slater G, Dr Senior Lecturer, Nutrition & Dietetics Switzerland Invitation to  International Olympic Committee Concensus Conference on Nutrion for sport 0 2,445
Smith T, Professor Director, SRC, Faculty Science Health & Ed United States of America AAG Conference, W DC, visit oakridge lab, visit University of Wyoming 8,920 0
Smith T, Professor Director, SRC, Faculty Science Health & Ed Thailand Coastal Zone in the Asia Pacific Conference 3,072 0
Smith T, Professor Director, SRC, Faculty Science Health & Ed New Zealand Attend New Zealand Geography Society Conference 2,489 0
Srivastava S, Dr Lecturer, Geospatial Analysis United Kingdom Attend a conference on pedagogical research in higher education 3,584 0
Sutakowsky L, Ms Clincal Coordinator, Nutrition & Dietetics India Research - Food service delivery at the Commonwealth Games 0 1,602
Thomsen D, Dr Senoir Lecturer, Sustainability & Advocacy New Zealand Attend New Zealand Geography Society Conference 2,754 0
Walker M, Ms Associate Lecturer, Exercise Science Denmark Research collaboration and data analysis 3,457 0
Wallace H, Professor Professor, Agricultural Ecology Solomon Islands Research Meetings 1,035 0
Wallace H, Professor Professor, Agricultural Ecology Fiji Attending meetings with PARDI 1,496 0
Wallace H, Professor Professor, Agricultural Ecology Fiji PARDI Workshop 2,341 0
Wallace H, Professor Professor, Agricultural Ecology Vanuatu Workshop 3,611 0
Warrick R, Professor Professor, Climate Change New Zealand Teaching Summer Semester ENS Intensive 3,351 0
Warrick R, Professor Professor, Climate Change Adaptation New Zealand Teaching courses at USC 2,480 0
Warrick R, Professor Professor, Climate Change aDaptation New Zealand Teaching ENS310 intensive 4,282 0
Warwick R, Professor Professor, Climate Change Adaptation New Zealand Teaching courses at USC 2,681 0
White R, Dr Senior Lecturer, Science & Education Spain International Association for Science and Knowledge, Learning and Teaching Conference 2010 3,361 0
Foundation          
Edmonds A, Ms Alumini Relations Officer Malaysia CASE Conference 5,495 285
Pentland A, Mr Executive Offiicer Malaysia CASE Conference 5,556 285
Captial Programs and Operations           
Bradley M, Mr Director - Capital Progams and Operations United States of America SCUP-45 & APPA, Robert Morris University, COMB, Harvard & MIT 11,561 0
Maguire R, Mr Manager, Operations New Zealand TEFMA Emergency Management Workshop 1,658 0
Maguire R, Mr Manager, Operations New Zealand Debriefing on University’s response to earthquake 1,059 0
McIntyre J, Ms Grants and Project Officer United States of America International Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare 4,558 0
Ulyate J, Mr Safety Officer New Zealand Debriefing on University’s response to earthquake 679 0
Information Technology Services           
Sandor L, Ms Business Systems Analyst New Zealand Peoplecode Rel 8.5 7,866 0
Regional Engagement           
Hefferan M, Professor Professor, Property & Development & PVC, Regional Engagement United States of America and Canada Visiting the University hospital in regards to work contracted for 23,096 0
Hefferan M, Professor Professor, Property & Development & PVC, Regional Engagement New Zealand Valuation of Land Tax Act 1,816 1,770
Hefferan M, Professor Professor, Property & Development & PVC, Regional Engagement Papua New Guinea Valuers General Visit 4,043 0
Strategic Information & Analysis Unit           
Foster M, Ms Student Feedback Officer New Zealand Australasian Higher Education Evaluation Forum 769 0
Wilkinson H, Mrs Data & Statistics Officer New Zealand Australasian Higher Education Evaluation Forum 770 0
Student Life and Learning           
Einfalt J, Ms Academic Skills & Land Adviser Student Life and Learning Germany PDP 8,910 0
Seeto E, Ms Director, Student Life and Learning New Zealand TEFMA Workshop and Aurims Conference 2,126 0
Teaching and Research Services           
Lynch K, Dr Associate Professor, ICT Research and Development Malaysia Pushing Content to Mobile Phones - What Students Want Conference 4,884 0
Maconachie D, Mr Director, TARS Spain ICED 2010 Conference 6,430 0
Palmer B, Ms Manager, Office of Research South Africa INORMS 2010 643 5,000
Stewart K, Ms Grants Officer South Africa INORMS 2010 Conference 6,070 0
Whelan K, Mrs Acting Manager, Centre for Support and Advancement of Learning and Teaching Spain ICED 2010 Conference and present paper 5,492 0
USC International           
Batzloff J, Mrs Associate Director France Study in Australia Tour de France 2010 - Marketing 8,504 0
Boon M, Ms Recruitment Officer France FrancAustralia Roadshow - Marketing & Recruitment 5,663 0
Boon M, Ms Recruitment Officer Scandinavia (Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Germany, Netherlands) Kilroy Live Marketing Show 9,932 0
Choong K, Mr Lecturer, Advertising Singapore IDP Open days and Polytechic 5,604 0
Eckard L, Ms Recruitment Coordinator Austria, Germany and the United States of America Visit of Austrian and German partner universities and conference attendance 10,909 0
Eckard L, Ms Recruitment Coordinator Austria and Germany Visit to USC Partner Universities and representation at the IRH Roadshow 9,538 0
Elliott R, Professor Pro Vice Chancellor, International & Quality New Caledonia IDP Australian Education Exhibition and student recruitment 2,036 0
Hanusch F, Dr Lecturer, Journalism Singapore and Germany Travel for USC International including conference attendance 4,075 0
MacDonald S, Ms Recruitment Officer France, Sweden and Singapore EAIE Conference and CIS Fair 7,216 0
O’Connor M, Ms Recruitment Assistant The Phillipines Agent (IDP Philiphine) visit 120 0
Scott T, Mr Recruitment Coordinator Japan and China International Student Recruitment 6,934 0
Scott T, Mr Recruitment Coordinator China JESIE - UniLearn (Australian Education Expo) 4,554 0
Scott T, Mr Recruitment Coordinator China and Taiwan Partner institution and Agent visits - Austrade SIA Taiwan Fair 12,133 0
Scott T, Mr Recruitment Coordinator Jordon, Libya and India Austrade SIA Fairs (Jordan and Libya) and Agent and Institution Visits (Inda) 14,763 0
Tamba E, Ms Director, International Relations Japan and China International Student Recruitment 11,950 0
Tamba E, Ms Director, International Relations South Korea International Student Recruitment 4,023 0
Tamba E, Ms Director, International Relations United States of America, Tawan and Japan International Student Recruitment and attend NAFSA conference 17,932 0
Tamba E, Ms Director, International Relations France, Japan and China International Student Recruitment 18,996 0
Tamba E, Ms Director, International Relations Japan and South Korea International Student Recruitment 13,284 0
Vallance J, Ms Admissions and Recruitment Officer United States of America Attend NAFSA conference 4,064 0
Vuille J, Ms Admissions and Recruitment Officer France Agent USC partner and student fairs 8,156 0
Vuille J, Ms Admissions and Recruitment Officer France and Singapore USC Partner and conference visit 11,161 0
White G, Mr Associate Director Germany Marketing and Agents visits 9,755 0
White G, Mr Associate Director Germany International Student Recruitment 6,033 0
White G, Mr Associate Director United States of America and Mexico Attendance at NAFSA conference and marketing in Mexico 10,153 0
White G, Mr Associate Director France, Germany and Singapore EAIE Conference and CIS Fair and marketing activities 16,134 0
White G, Mr Associate Director Mexico Vistiting Institutional partners and agents in Mexico 545 0
Williams B, Mr International Partner Programs and Pathways Coordinator Singapore IDP Open days and Polytechic 3,245 0
Williams B, Mr International Partner Programs and Pathways Coordinator Singapore Marketing IDP Open Days partner institution and agent visits 4,282 0
Williams B, Mr International Partner Programs and Pathways Coordinator Vietnam Marketing Austrade Events and partner institution and agent visits 5,317 0
Wynder M, Dr Senior Lecturer, Accounting Germany Teaching and visits on behalf of International Relations 3,734 0
TOTAL         906,154 46,593

Appendix

Appendix 1

STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2015

Inits first 15 years as a new public university for the Sunshine Coast region, USC has demonstrated its viability in terms of student demand, enrolment growth, teaching and research outcomes, campus development, financial position, regional contribution and reputation. The University is poised for its next stage of development with a new leadership team, ambitious research goals and plans to double enrolments within the next decade.

Progress

The15 years from 1996 to 2010 represented the establishment period for the University. During the early years it built the Sippy Downs campus, drew on the experience of other Australian universities to create its institutional structures and functions, and commenced with general undergraduate programs in the humanities, sciences and business. In a second wave of development from 2004, USC committed strongly to professional and paraprofessional programs, and focused heavily on engaging with the local region, providing access to higher education and seeking to catalyse regional development. It also initiated research, research training and innovation in collaboration with regional and national organisations.

By the time the inaugural Vice-Chancellor, Professor Paul Thomas AM, retired at the end of 2010, USC had proven its viability, created an enviable master-planned campus and grown to 8,000 students (13 percent from overseas) and 600 staff. It had an annual budget of $120 million, achieved consistently high ratings for teaching quality, and gained national and international recognition for niche areas of research. Through the development of the Innovation Centre, with its business incubator and accelerator, the University had deepened its connections with the regional community and economy.

The next five years

The course for this next phase of USC’s development will be set by a new Vice-Chancellor and President, and new priorities. Other significant changes to USC leadership in 2011 include a new Deputy Vice-Chancellor and a foundation Pro Vice-Chancellor Research. In addition, the retirement of two of the three Deans presents opportunity for review of the academic structure.

The early period of USC’s second 15 years will be characterised by naturally reinforcing themes.

Deregulation of student enrolments, including a student-centred, demand-driven funding system from 2012 and targets for higher education participation and low-SES students, will impact on the University’s profile and teaching. Learning and teaching at USC will build on its existing reputation and become an exemplar of access and success in the Australian higher education sector. Opportunity will be provided over a broader region, and students and the wider community will have educational, cultural and economic possibilities well beyond current provision.

Research outcomes and outputs will increase in both quantity and quality. Existing areas of research concentration will be strengthened through collaboration with the best researchers in these fields in Australia and internationally. Strategic partnerships will be expanded with related government agencies, industry and business. In addition, there will be substantially more applied research conducted with, and for the benefit of, the wider community.

Rapid growth of the University and the region it serves presents a major challenge for USC’s institutional capacity and capability. Professional development of staff at all levels will be a priority, the University’s systems will undergo major reinvestments and core infrastructure will be expanded. Above all, development of strategic partnerships at regional, national and international levels will advance USC’s footprint, profile and performance.

VISION

The University of the Sunshine Coast is regionally relevant and recognised, nationally and internationally, for excellence in teaching, research and engagement.

VALUES

The University is committed to:

  • Creating and disseminating knowledge through innovative and effective teaching and research
  • Fostering freedom of inquiry and expression
  • The process of lifelong learning
  • Engaging in and responding to the region’s intellectual, cultural and economic challenges
  • Adopting consultative processes and ethical behaviours in all activities
  • Engendering respect throughout the University community
  • Fairness, openness, honesty, trust and effective communication
  • Developing the University and supporting the region as a sustainability exemplar
  • Advancing human rights within a tolerant and inclusive community, in which respect for Indigenous peoples is fundamental
STRATEGIC PRIORITIES
  1. The University has four strategic priorities. The University will:
  2. enable access to the USC experience
  3. deliver high quality teaching, learning and graduate outcomes
  4. build research productivity and output significantly
  5. develop USC for a sustainable future
Strategic Priority 1:

To enable access to the USC experience

KEY STRATEGIES 

1.1 Recruit and support a diverse student population

1.2 Provide a high quality student experience

1.3 Develop a vibrant and healthy University community and identity

1.4 Engage with the regional community through educational, cultural, creative, economic and recreational activities

1.5 Extend learning opportunities throughout the region

Strategic Priority 2:

To deliver high quality teaching, learning and graduate outcomes

KEY STRATEGIES 

2.1 Embed academic excellence in all teaching and learning activities

2.2 Support diverse learning and teaching styles to maximize student participation and success

2.3 Offer innovative programs, in particular via partnerships

2.4 Produce graduates with knowledge, skills and attributes to succeed in a world characterised by rapid change

Strategic Priority 3:

To build research productivity and output significantly

KEY STRATEGIES 

3.1 Strengthen research capability

3.2 Develop research groups in disciplinary and cross-disciplinary areas

3.3 Focus research on regionally relevant and strategic areas

3.4 Leverage research outputs to enable productive partnerships

Strategic Priority 4:

To develop USC for a sustainable future

KEY STRATEGIES 

4.1 Develop and enable staff to manage change and contribute to achievement of the strategic plan

4.2 Invest in and continuously improve information management systems, business processes and workforce planning

4.3 Advance the University through key strategic partnerships

4.4 Maximise opportunities to develop well designed, technology rich, sustainable University sites

PERFORMANCE MEASURES BY 2015

Access and engagement

12,000 students by 2015

SES participation

Learning and teaching

Student satisfaction

Graduate outcomes

Research output

Research grants income

Weighted publications

Higher Degree Research students:

load-proportion in selected areas of research strength

Sustainable future

Employment costs as a percentage of total revenue

Operating margin

Capital improvements: proportion of total income invested from operating funds

IMPLEMENTING THE STRATEGIC PLAN

The role of the strategic plan is to articulate the broad goals and aims of the University over the next five years. Specific strategies are set out in the top level plans which have been developed in the areas of

  • Access to the USC experience
  • Delivery of high quality teaching, learning and graduate outcomes
  • Increased research productivity and output
  • Development of USC for a sustainable future
  • Supporting strategies guide the University’s involvement in international activities and regional engagement.

Glossary

AGS 

Australian Graduate Survey

ALTC 

Australian Learning and Teaching Council

APT 

Administrative, Professional and Technical (Staff)

ARMC 

Audit and Risk Management Committee

AUQA 

Australian Universities Quality Agency

CEQ 

Course Experience Questionnaire

CGS 

Commonwealth Grant Scheme

CHASE 

Centre for Healthy Activities, Sport and Exercise

CPO 

Capital Programs and Operations

CRICOS 

Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students

DEEWR 

Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (previously the Department of Education, Science and Training)

DIISR 

Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research

EFTSL 

Equivalent Full-Time Student Load

FTE 

Full-time equivalent (Staff)

HDR 

Higher Degree by Research (Student)

HERDC 

Higher Education Research Data Collection

ICSC 

Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast

ICT 

Information and Communication Technology

IFP 

International Foundation Pathway

PPR 

Performance, Planning and Review (Staff)

QTAC 

Queensland Tertiary Admissions Centre

SFC 

Student Feedback on Courses

SFT 

Student Feedback on Teaching

T&R 

Teaching and Research (Staff)

TEFMA 

Australasian Tertiary Education Facilities Management Association

TEP 

Tertiary Enabling Pathway

TEQSA 

Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency 

TPP 

Tertiary Preparation Pathway

USC 

University of the Sunshine Coast

WIL 

Work Integrated Learning

The University of the Sunshine Coast began as the Sunshine Coast University College. Founded in 1994, the first students started at the Sippy Downs campus in 1996. In 1998 the new institution was granted full university status, and became the University of the Sunshine Coast on 1 January 1999.

The 100-hectare Sippy Downs campus lies around 90km north of Brisbane on land that was once a cane farm. Other teaching and research facilities include Dilli Village on Fraser Island and the Noosa Centre. In 2010, USC had a total operating revenue of more than $120 million and employed 684 staff (full-time equivalent).

USC has the highest rating for teaching quality, generic skills, and graduate satisfaction of any public university in Queensland*. In 2010, more than 7,000 students (including about 800 postgraduates and 870 international students) enrolled in more than 160 academic programs through three faculties: Arts and Social Sciences; Business; and Science, Health and Education. The University conferred more than 1,600 degrees, bringing alumni numbers to 8,618.

*The ratings of five stars for teaching quality and generic skills, and four stars for graduate satisfaction were awarded to USC by the Good Universities Guide 2011 using information obtained from Graduate Careers Australia’s Course Experience Questionnaire, the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, and the University.

The University of the Sunshine Coast was the first greenfield university to be established in Australia since 1975. Founded in 1994, USC took its first 500 students at the Sippy Downs campus in 1996. Enrolments grew to more than 7,000 in 2010, with the student population projected to double in the next decade.

The 100-hectare campus lies 90km north of Brisbane on land that was once a cane farm. The University has won many architectural awards and is part of a wildlife reserve.

MAROOCHYDORE DC QLD 4558

Australia

Tel: 07 5430 1234

Fax: 07 5430 1111

Web: www.usc.edu.au

CRICOS Provider Number: 01595D

The University of the Sunshine Coast’s full statutory annual report is available online at www.usc.edu.au/reports. Copies of the 2010 annual report areavailable from the Administrator, Office of Marketing and Communications, University of the Sunshine Coast, by telephoning +61 7 5459 4558 or faxing +617 5430 1187.

© University of the Sunshine Coast 2011 | Published by University of the Sunshine Coast March 2011. | Information contained in this publication was correct at the time of publishing. For the most up-to-date information about the University, visit www.usc.edu.au | All amounts are in Australian dollars. | University of the Sunshine Coast is registered on the Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students.

Addendum

Carers (Recognition) Act 2008

The University of the Sunshine Coast supports the Queensland Carers Charter as detailed in the Carers (Recognition) Act 2008, through the flexible work practices and remote access facilities available to our staff and students. The University ensures staff and students are provided with relevant information and support as required.

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Searching {{ model.SearchType }} for returned more than {{ model.MaxResults }} results.
The top {{ model.MaxResults }} of {{ model.TotalItems }} are shown below.

Searching {{ model.SearchType }} for returned {{ model.TotalItems }} results.

Searching {{ model.SearchType }} for returned no results.