Program

Accessibility links

Systems Thinking: Optimising Performance and Managing Risk 
2019 Research Symposium

The Centre for Human Factors and Sociotechnical Systems is convening a one-day symposium and two-day series of HFE methods workshops at USC Sunshine Coast, from Monday 4 February until Wednesday 6 February 2019.

Day 1: Monday 4 February 

8.30am

Registration open

9am

Plenary: Don't shoot the messenger: The Human Factors of mandatory passing distances for cyclists

Professor Guy Walker

Heriot Watt University

9.45am

Human Factors on the Dark Side: Using Systems Design and Analysis Methods to Break Bad Systems

Professor Paul Salmon

Human factors and Ergonomics (HFE) methods have a long history of being used to understand and optimise the behaviour of individuals, teams, organisations, and even entire systems. In recent times, the capacity of HFE methods to do the opposite, and support the disruption of systems designed to achieve illicit ends, has been recognised. This presentation describes a series of projects in which HFE methods such as Cognitive Work Analysis (CWA), System Theoretic Accident Model and Process (STAMP), and the Event Analysis of Systemic Teamwork (EAST) are being used to identify ways in which to disrupt terrorist cells and the trade of illicit goods in the Dark Net. In closing, a series of new application areas are discussed, as are the benefits of using HFE to disrupt systems and optimise them.

10.15am

Morning Tea + 2018 Book Launch

10.45am

Integrating Human Factors and Design Thinking for Creating Sustainable Interventions in Sociotechnical Systems

Dr Gemma Read

Human factors is a design discipline, yet design is a challenging task and many of our existing methods and tools do not directly contribute to design. The Cognitive Work Analysis Design Toolkit (CWA-DT) was developed to assist in closing the gap between analysis and design in Human Factors. The CWA-DT is underpinned by systems thinking, and advocates for values-based participatory design which follows an iterative process, so that unintended consequences can be identified and addressed prior to implementation. This presentation will introduce the CWA-DT and discuss its application with examples from five design and re-design applications across public transport ticketing systems, rail level crossings, led outdoor activities, road intersections, and road transport systems more generally.

11.15am

Teamwork Analysis: Learnings from Sport to Other Domains

Dr Scott McLean

The analysis of team performance is complex and multi-faceted. A key component of assessing team performance is to understand the interactions between the components of performance, and between the team members. Team sport is characteristic of complex sociotechnical systems comprising multiple human and non-human agents that exhibits emergent properties, non-linear interactions, multiple control and feedback loops, loose and tight coupling, and rapid decision-making. As such, team sport provides a representative setting for understanding the mechanisms of teamwork which are generalisable across multiple disciplines and domains.

11.45am

Lunch

12.30pm

Co-designing Incident Reporting and Investigation Tools to Support Systems Thinking in the Workplace

Dr Natassia Goode

The need to apply "systems thinking" to understand and prevent workplace injuries is widely known in organisations, yet most incident reporting and investigation tools do not adequately support this approach. This presentation will describe a series of projects where we have worked closely with practitioners to translate the latest research on systems thinking methods into practical, usable tools that help organisations manage their response to incidents. The presentation will highlight the key principles for embedding systems thinking into incident reporting and investigation tools.

1pm

Optimising Infrastructure, Land Use Planning and Urban Design: Human Factors and Ergonomics Methods for Building Better Cities

Dr Nicholas Stevens

The worlds cities are facing crises at an unprecedented scale; infrastructure overload, climate change adaption, urban migration and sprawl. What is clear is the current business as usual approaches and understanding of cities is no longer sufficient. This presentation outlines a series of projects and approaches that have utilised HFE methods for the assessment, organisation and re-design of city development and urban design. To meet the challenges of current and future urban development the continued development and application of HFE and sociotechnical systems approaches are essential.

1.30pm

Panel Discussion

2.30pm

Afternoon tea

3pm

Keynote: The Impossible Task: Why do automated vehicles crash?

Professor Neville Stanton

University of Southampton

4pm

Closing; drinks + nibbles

Day 2: Tuesday 5 February 

Choose from either workshop:

Understanding sociotechnical systems with Cognitive Work Analysis - Facilitated by Dr Gemma Read

This workshop will provide an introduction to Cognitive Work Analysis (CWA), a systems-based framework for analysing behaviour within sociotechnical systems. CWA provides a way to describe a system in a holistic way, and to explore how the design of the system influences behaviour. The workshop will provide an overview of CWA’s five phases of analysis, with practical exercises using a selection of the framework’s tools. Attendees will also gain an understanding of how the tools can be used to support human factors design and evaluation activities.

The workshop will be of interest to those involved in the system design, system evaluation or anyone interested in new tools that they can use to gain a holistic understanding of the complex sociotechnical systems in which they work.

Hierarchical Task Analysis - Facilitated by Professor Guy Walker

Hierarchical Task Analysis (HTA) is used to describe and understand behaviour in complex systems. In addition, HTAs are used as the input for various Human Factors and Ergonomics methods such as human error identification, risk assessment, job design, and allocation of functions. This workshop includes an introduction to HTA and an overview of its previous applications. Following this, attendees will be given step-by-step guidance on how to apply HTA in practice. Attendees will then gain practical experience of using HTA by applying it to a case study with support from the workshop convenors. This workshop will be useful for those working in the areas of Human Factors and Ergonomics, systems analysis and design, risk assessment, and safety management.

Systems-Theoretic Accident Model and Processes - Facilitated by Professor Paul Salmon

Systems-Theoretic Accident Model and Processes (STAMP) provides a set of methods that can be used for accident analysis (CAST), risk assessment (STPA), and systems analysis (Control structure). This workshop includes an introduction to STAMP and an overview of the control structure, CAST and STPA methods. Attendees will then be taken through examples of previous applications, following which they will be given step-by-step guidance on how to apply the methods in practice. Attendees will then gain practical experience of using STAMP by applying it to a case study with support from the workshop convenors. This workshop will be useful for those working in the areas of Human Factors and Ergonomics, accident analysis and investigation, risk assessment, and safety management generally.

9am Registration open
9.30am Workshop start 
10.30am Working morning tea
12pm Lunch
12.45pm Workshop recommence
2.30pm Working afternoon tea
4pm Close
Day 3: Wednesday 6 February

Choose from either workshop:

Applying Accimap to understand and prevent workplace injuries - Facilitated by Dr Natassia Goode

This workshop will introduce the Accimap accident analysis methodology along with practical guidance on how to use it in workplace settings. Accimap enables analysts to graphically represent the contributing factors influencing safety and accidents across all levels of the system in question, along with the relationships between them. This allows for a deeper understanding of how interactions within work systems contribute to hazardous conditions and adverse events. The method can be used both reactively to understand accident causation, and proactively, to understand the factors influencing safety within the work setting. The session will present three examples from projects from air freight, road transport and outdoor education. The workshop will be of interest to those involved in safety management, accident analysis, incident reporting and investigation.

Event Analysis of Systemic Teamwork - Facilitated by Professor Neville Stanton  

The Event Analysis of Systemic Teamwork (EAST) is a systems analysis framework that is used to describe and understand system behaviour, analyse accidents, and to proactively identify risks. This workshop includes an introduction to EAST and an overview of its four key methods: task, social, information and composite networks. Attendees will then be taken through examples of previous applications, following which they will be given step-by-step guidance on how to apply EAST in practice. Attendees will then gain practical experience of using EAST by applying it to a case study with support from the workshop convenors. This workshop will be useful for those working in the areas of Human Factors and Ergonomics, safety and risk management, accident analysis and investigation, and systems analysis and design.

Networked Hazard Analysis and Risk Management System - Facilitated by Professor Paul Salmon

The Networked Hazard Analysis and Risk Management System (NET-HARMS) is a new systems thinking-based risk assessment method that provides analysts with a simple and easy to use tool for identifying risks across complex work systems. The workshop will begin with an introduction to NET-HARMS and an overview of the approach. Attendees will then be taken through examples of previous applications, following which they will be given step-by-step guidance on how to apply NET-HARMS in practice. Attendees will then gain practical experience of using NET-HARMS by applying it to a case study with support from the workshop convenors. This workshop will be useful for those working in the areas of Human Factors and Ergonomics, safety and risk assessment, and to those interested in task analysis, systems analysis, risk assessment, and performance prediction methods..

9am Registration open
9.30am Workshop start
10.30am Working morning tea
12pm Lunch
12.45pm Workshop recommence
2.30pm Working afternoon tea
4pm Close
Back to top

Pro tip: To search, just start typing - at any time, on any page.

Searching {{ model.SearchType }} for returned more than {{ model.MaxResults }} results.
The top {{ model.MaxResults }} of {{ model.TotalItems }} are shown below.

Searching {{ model.SearchType }} for returned {{ model.TotalItems }} results.

Searching {{ model.SearchType }} for returned no results.