Dr. Gabrielle Simcock - University of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia

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Dr. Gabrielle Simcock

PhD Cognitive Psychology OU, Honours 1st Class OU, BA OU

  • Research Fellow, Cognitive Psychology, Sunshine Coast Mind & Neuroscience - Thompson Institute
Email
Telephone
+61 7 5456 3958
Office location
TI2.59
Campus
Sunshine Coast
Dr. Gabrielle Simcock

Profile

Dr Gabrielle Simcock holds a PhD in cognitive psychology and has spent her career investigating factors that influence this important domain of development during childhood. Most recently, Dr Simcock co-ordinated the longitudinal, multidisciplinary Queensland stress in pregnancy study (QF2011) at Mater Research, Brisbane. This study assessed the effects of the 2011 flood on pregnant women and their children’s cognitive, behavioural, and social-emotional development from birth to 6 years. This study resulted in sixteen publications in well-regarded psychology and paediatric journals since 2015.

Dr Simcock joined the Sunshine Coast Mind and Neuroscience - Thompson Institute in October 2018 as a post-doc specialising in cognitive development. Her position on one recently established study in Youth Mental Health, the longitudinal adolescent brain study (LABS), is to understand how cognition (eg, attention, learning, memory, processing speed and executive functioning) changes across adolescence (12-18 years) and to examine the association between cognitive function and mental health and wellbeing during this important phase of development.

Professional memberships

  • American Psychological Society

Potential research projects for HDR and Honours students

  • Cognitive development across adolescence
  • The association between cognitive function and adolescent mental health

Research areas

  • Prenatal maternal stress
  • Learning and memory in childhood
  • Adolescent cognitive function

Dr Simcock’s specialist areas of knowledge include developmental psychology, prenatal maternal stress, learning and memory in childhood, adolescent cognitive function

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