Gender Affirmation Guidelines - University of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia

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Gender Affirmation Guidelines

The University of the Sunshine Coast is a community that recognises and embraces diversity  within our staff, students, and community partnerships. It provides an inclusive environment where each individual feels respected, connected, and empowered to rise and shine.

We strive to eliminate discrimination, harassment, bullying, and vilification in all aspects of its operations and to create an environment where all members of the University community can work and study within a culture based on mutual respect.

These Gender Affirmation Guidelines aim to provide information and guidance for all members of the USC community on how to achieve an inclusive and supportive educational and working environment for those seeking to affirm or transition their gender. The guide is designed to be flexible enough to customise an affirmation/transition plan to individual circumstances, but also specific enough to provide a consistent approach for managing the affirmation and transition processes.

Gender transition is a personal journey

'Hi, I’m Mark, I grew up in a very supportive family environment, so when I started to feel so different and uncomfortable as a girl, it was easier to talk to my family and then get support externally to find where I felt comfortable. There is not always this support for transgender people, and many experience isolation from family and community because they are afraid of the discrimination and vilification they might face.'

Overview

An individual's gender identity or gender expression may not conform to society’s expectations or stereotypes about the gender assigned to them at birth. The term ‘transgender’ is an umbrella term commonly used to describe a broad spectrum of people whose gender identity or expression does not match their birth sex.

Gender-diverse is a term that refers to an individual’s behavior or gender expression that does not match the gender norms or societal stereotypes such as male, female, and other heteronormative descriptive terms.

Transition is a unique journey for each individual and may involve social, medical, and legal transition.

Individuals who consider themselves to be transgender, or gender diverse, may not undergo a gender transition. For some gender-diverse and transgender people, they may go through an affirmation process, where their gender is affirmed through a plan.

However, given that many affirming/transitioning individuals must “come out” within the USC community to live authentically, USC will necessarily become involved in the process. During this time, it is the role of the student or staff nominated by an individual as a support person to ensure a supportive and respectful environment is maintained. This is important for all USC community members, but it is particularly critical for gender affirming and transitioning individuals.

What does it mean to be Transgender?

Only an individual knows their gender, with studies showing that awareness of gender starts to form between 18 months and three years of age in typically developing children. Many trans individuals have known since they were a child that their gender identity is different from their birth-assigned sex. For others, they may know something is different, but they may not be able to express their gender identity until puberty or later in life. Examples that may impact an individual’s gender expression may include geographical location, lack of professional support services/groups, peer pressure, fear of losing family and friends, homelessness and prejudices.

Being transgender doesn’t necessarily mean that someone is uncomfortable within their own body, but people can sometimes experience this. People may also experience severe discomfort when not perceived as their affirmed gender identity. An individual’s affirmed gender is the gender that matches their gender identity. For example, if a person is assigned female at birth and identifies as male, their affirmed gender is male. Often transgender individuals will feel more comfortable, confident, or able to be their authentic selves when they can express themselves as their affirmed gender.

Transitioning is the process an individual goes through when they begin to live as their affirmed gender, rather than that assigned to them at birth. It is a personal journey and it can take some time.

Individuals experience transitioning in different ways. Transition is a personalised process that varies in length, stages, and complexity from person to person. That means that each individual will have a different way of defining themselves depending on what is important to them. Gender transition or affirmation is about the pathways an individual chooses to express themselves; this could be socially, medically, or taking legal transition.

For some transgender people, a change of name is enough. For others, a change of name and gender expression is better, and others want a combination of all. Depending on an individual’s comfortability they may express themselves differently in certain social or private situations. For example, someone might be out with family so they dress according to their affirmed gender, however they may not feel ready to do this in a social setting, like going to Uni.

Gender identity is an individual’s personal experience and understanding of themselves. Not everyone identifies as male or female though. Some including transgender people they don’t feel comfortable aligning themselves with a gender. They prefer to identify as non-binary and may feel a mix of genders, or aligning with no gender is a better way of expressing their unique selves.

Defining gender transition 

Gender transition can be defined as a process of change through a social, medical, or legal transition.

Social transition /affirmation

Social transition is how an individual makes others aware of their gender identity. This means changes in appearance and social situations, and can include changes in hairstyle and clothing, name and pronoun changes, and use of all gender toilets.

Medical transition /affirmation

Medical transition is when an individual makes the decision to access medical ways of affirming their gender, such as hormones, surgery or behavior training to feel more comfortable in their own bodies and is always done by seeking expert advice from a psychiatrist or psychologist who specialises in gender therapy. In most states, if the person is under 18, they will need a parent’s permission to undertake a medical transition. A medical transition requires a medical professional to supervise the transition.

Legal transition /affirmation

Australian Government Guidelines on the Recognition of Sex and Gender recognises that individuals may identify as a gender other than the sex they were assigned at birth or may not identify as male or female and that this should be reflected in records held by the government. The guidelines also standardise the evidence required for a person to change their sex/gender in personal records held by Australian Government departments and agencies. Some formal documents need to be changed at a state level and may have different ‘proof of identity’ requirements and different gender identity options.

Rights and responsibilities 

At USC, everyone within our community has the right to have their gender identity respected and acknowledged, without fear of negative consequences. As such there are rights and responsibilities which must be upheld by all USC community members about gender diverse and transgender students and staff.

These include:

Non-discrimination

The University does not tolerate intentional or unintentional discrimination or harassment between members of the USC community, staff, and students. There is a commitment to uphold the Sex Discrimination Act 1984 (Cth), Anti-Discrimination Act 1991 (Qld), Fair Work Act 2009 (Cth), the Human Rights Act (Qld), Staff Code of Conduct - Governing Policy, and Student Code of Conduct, the Student Charter, Equity and Diversity Governing Policy and Anti-Discrimination and Freedom from Bullying and Harassment (Staff) – Governing Policy.

Right to privacy

Transgender and gender diverse individuals have the right to be who they are without unnecessary disclosure of medical or personal information. An individual's right to privacy is to be  respected throughout the gender transition process.

  •  Permission is required from the gender transitioning individual before disclosing any personal details.
  •  USC may require proof of identity for verification purposes, however evidence of gender affirmation surgery or treatment is never a requirement.
  •  Gender transitioning individuals will be informed by USC if personal information needs to be shared to support the staff or student experience.

Leave and time off

The affirmation/transition process may require an individual to take time off from work and/or study. USC leave guidelines to apply to individuals that are transitioning.

Appearance and restrooms

Transgender and gender diverse individuals can dress consistently with their gender identity and use facilities that correspond to their gender identity.

Information for affirming/transitioning staff

This procedure outlines the process and support available to staff when seeking to affirm or transition their gender. The gender affirmation or transition process is different for everyone, but it may involve a change of name, title, appearance, dress, use of pronouns and other aspects to align an individual with their affirmed gender.

General considerations

There are many factors to consider when transitioning at USC. To ensure the affirmation/transition process is as smooth as possible, staff are encouraged to confidentially contact their manager in advance of the planned transition date so that the necessary support can be provided. Staff should discuss their intentions, needs, and concerns, as appropriate. In some cases, a staff member’s manager may not have a high level of awareness about transgender issues, and some time may be required to educate others about the needs of a transitioning staff member. In consultation with the relevant manager, a confidential transition/affirmation plan should be developed.

If a staff member is uncomfortable contacting their manager to discuss a transition/affirmation plan, Human Resources can help provide additional support. A staff member may be accompanied by a support person to attend meetings with their manager as required, and the transitioning staff member will be able to guide details within the plan regarding the timing of  who needs to be informed and how.

If a staff member feels they have been discriminated against or harassed, they can report this or seek support from Human Resources. Further details about the process are available at Staff Conduct and Compliance.

Transition plan

The transition plan is a useful framework for managing the transition process. There is no legal requirement for a staff member to inform their supervisor or anyone else in the workplace of their intention to affirm or transition.

Support

Together with the relevant manager, a transitioning staff member will need to consider who will be confidentially informed about their transition/affirmation and who may be part of their support and advocacy network. A support network might include the staff member’s manager, a member of Human Resources, a work colleague, or a trusted member of the USC LGBTIQ+ Ally Network.

Ensuring a successful transition at USC requires thoughtful planning in advance of your transition date. There is no ‘best’ method of transitioning. All parties involved must use an adaptive process regarding the transition plan, adjusting and revising the plan for the situation and circumstances at hand.

 Below is a list of actions to consider:

  •  The date on which you assume gender identity at USC
  • Creation of support and advocacy network
  • Planning of back up or leave of absence if required
  • The identification of USC records that will need to be changed. Timeframes and approval process for the changes
  • Development of a communication strategy, detailing how others will be informed and how to address any inappropriate response to your transition promptly

Identification changes

USC is required to take reasonable steps to ensure personal information on University records is correct. If a staff member needs to amend their details, the amendment should be verified using evidence to demonstrate a link between the person’s former and current identity. However, evidence of gender affirmation surgery or treatment is never a requirement. Personal details, such as a preferred name, can be updated using the Personal Details Form on MyUSC without any documentation required. Changing gender and family name on formal USC records can be done by completing the same form and providing the relevant documents to Human Resources.

IMPORTANT: Evidence, such as passport, birth certificate or valid driver’s license will be required to change staff’s formal name. This is because the formal name is used for tax, pay, and superannuation purposes. For more information please contact  Human Resources.

Changing a staff member’s preferred name will not automatically result in changes to ID cards and email. However, affirming staff can get assistance with relevant changes by contacting Human Resources.

Items which may require amendment at USC are detailed below:

Title

Staff can amend their title by completing the Personal Details Form on MyUSC at any time without verification. If preferred, title fields may be left blank. A title conferred by way of degree, award or honour is amended by Human Resources upon request and in accordance with University policy.

Preferred name and pronouns

Staff can amend their preferred name and title by completing the Personal Details Form on MyUSC at any time without verification. It is recommended that staff advise their manager of their preferred name and pronouns in writing.

Given name and family name

A request to amend a staff member’s given and/or family name can be made to Human Resources by submitting a Personal Details Form on MyUSC and supplying the relevant documents. To amend an existing record, the University will need to link the change of existing record to the new record. To support this process, staff will be asked to provide proof of identity. The system change will take effect once Human Resources have sighted the following evidence:

  • Official Change of Name Certificate, or
  • Valid Passport specifying amended sex

Gender

A request to amend a staff member’s gender can be made to Human Resources by completing a Personal Details Form on MyUSC at any time.

USC systems allow for identification as M (male), F (female) or Other (indeterminate/intersex/unspecified/sexual or gender diverse)

  • Official Change of Name Certificate, or
  • Valid Passport specifying amended sex
  • Statutory Declaration stating affirmed gender

IMPORTANT: If your name and/or gender are not changed with relevant agencies with whom you have dealings, for example the Australian Taxation Office and UniSuper, there may be unexpected consequences.

Leave

USC leave guidelines apply to transitioning staff to the same extent as they would apply to other staff.

A staff member who requires time off should speak with their manager who will be able to assist in understanding leave benefits available to staff through referral to the appropriate resources for leave and time off.

Self-care

Employee Assistance Program (EAP) is available for all USC staff for support and advice on a range of topics and is confidential.

Specific external agencies can be found in the resource section of this guide.

Information for affirming/transitioning students

This procedure outlines the process and support available to students when seeking to affirm or transition their gender. The gender affirmation or transition process is different for everyone, but it may involve a change of name, title, appearance, dress, use of pronouns and other aspects to align an individual with their affirmed gender.

General considerations

There are many factors to consider when transitioning at USC. To ensure the affirmation/transition is as smooth as possible, transitioning students are encouraged to confidentially contact Student Wellbeing  in advance of the planned transition date so that the necessary support can be provided. Students should discuss their intentions, needs, and concerns, as appropriate. In some cases, the relevant support person may not have a high level of awareness about transgender issues, and some time may be required to educate others about individual needs. In consultation with the relevant case manager, a confidential transition/affirmation plan should be developed.

If a student feels they have been discriminated against, or harassed, they have the right to report this and/or seek support from Student Wellbeing or Safe USC. Information can be sought from the university website under Complaints, compliments, feedback.

Transition plan

The transition plan is a useful framework for managing the transition process. There is no legal requirement for a student to inform USC or anyone else in the learning environment of their intention to affirm or transition. If a student chooses to disclose their intention to affirm or transition their gender and would like to discuss a gender affirmation or transition plan, this can be done with the assistance from a representative from Student Wellbeing.

Support

Together with a student support person, transitioning students will need to consider who will be confidentially informed about their transition/affirmation and who may be part of their support and advocacy network. It is highly recommended that a support and advocacy network is established.

Ensuring a successful transition at USC requires thoughtful planning in advance of their transition date. It is therefore recommended that together with your student support person a confidential transition plan is developed, if possible, in advance of your transition date. There is no ‘best’ method of transitioning. All parties involved use an adaptive process regarding the transition plan, adjusting and revising the plan for the situation and circumstances at hand.

The plan should, at a minimum, include:

  • The date on which  gender identity is assumed at USC
  • Creation of support and advocacy network
  • Planning of leave of absence if required
  • The identification of USC records that will need to be changed. Timeframes and approval process for these changes
  • Development of a communication strategy, detailing how others will be informed and plans how to address any inappropriate response to your transition promptly
  • Development of a Learning Access Plan

Identification changes

USC is required to take reasonable steps to ensure personal information on University records is correct. If a student needs to amend their details, the amendment should be verified using evidence to demonstrate a link between their former and current identity. However, evidence of gender affirmation surgery or treatment is never a requirement. You can update personal details, such as a preferred name and title via the personal details on Student Central. Gender can be updated on USC records by completing the Change of Personal Details Form and submitting the form, with the requested documents, to USC Central.

IMPORTANT: Changing the name and/or gender in the University's records is not the same as legally changing someone’s name. Before deciding to change the name and/or gender on their records, students are advised that the University is subject to government reporting obligations. If their name and/or gender are not changed with all government agencies with whom they have dealings, making a change at USC may have unexpected negative consequences. For example, Centrelink payments may be interrupted if USC records no longer match Centrelink records. Students must also update their change of details with the Australian Taxation Office, otherwise they will be ineligible to defer their student contribution (tuition fees) to the HELP Loan, if their details do not match. When a student graduates, the university is obliged to issue qualifications (testamurs) using their legal name, as these are issued under the University Seal as legal documents. Therefore, for a student's testamur to be issued in a new name, it is necessary for the student to change their legal name prior to graduation and provide USC with documentary evidence to support this. A student’s name and/or gender will appear in our database and on future academic documents; however, their prior name and/or gender will be maintained in the University’s database so that the University can search for and locate previous electronic and paper records.

Changing your preferred name will not automatically result in changes to ID cards, examination registration and email. However, affirming students can get assistance with relevant changes by contacting Student Wellbeing.

Items which may require amendment at USC are detailed below:

Title

Students can amend their title online via their personal details in USC Central at any time without verification. If preferred, title fields may be left blank. A title conferred by way of degree, award or honour is amended by USC Central upon request and in accordance with University policy.

Preferred name and pronouns

Students can amend their preferred name online via their personal details in USC Central anytime without verification. It is recommended that students advise their student support person of their preferred name and pronouns in writing.

Given and family name

A Request to amend a given and/or family name can be done by filling out the Change of Personal Details Form on USC Central and providing the relevant documents requested. To amend an existing record, the University will need to link the change of existing record to the new record. To support this process, you will be asked to provide proof of identity. The system change will take effect once Student Central has sighted the following evidence:

  • Official Change of Name Certificate, or
  • Valid Passport

Gender

A request to amend gender on USC records can be made by completing a Change of Personal Details form. The form should be submitted, along with the requested documents, to USC Central

USC systems allow for identification as M (male), F (female) or X (indeterminate/intersex/unspecified/sexual or gender diverse)

  • Official Change of Name Certificate, or
  • Valid Passport specifying amended sex
  • Statutory Declaration stating affirmed gender
  • Statement from a medical professional confirming gender affirmation/transition

Deferral/Leave of absence

Students who are undergoing gender transition are entitled to apply to defer their initial enrollment or take a leave of absence from their studies.

Self-care

Student Wellbeing is available for students for face to face and online appointments at all campuses;  Pride Club  is a peer support group meeting weekly at the Sunshine Coast, Caboolture and Moreton Bay Campuses.

Specific external agencies can be found in the resource section of this page.

Information for managers and student support staff

General considerations

Fostering diversity is a major contributing factor to the success of a safe, innovative, and prosperous environment at USC. Everyone within our community has the right to bring their authentic selves to study and work and to have their gender identity respected and acknowledged without fear of negative consequences. If managers or student advisors, are unfamiliar with transgender or gender nonconformity, they must seek support, guidance, and training from Human Resources or Access and Diversity. Managers and student support staff are also highly encouraged to seek external advice and support from organisations including but not limited to Queensland Council for LGBTI Health (formally Queensland Aids Council)Minus 18 “LGBTIQ+ Youth,” the National LGBTI Health Alliance and the Queensland Human Rights Commission .

As a manager or student support person, support for transitioning staff and students is critical for individual's who inform us of their intention to transition or who are in the process of transitioning. The most effective way to establish a welcoming, supportive, and safe atmosphere is to lead by example. Below is guidance to assist you in these conversations.

Open, inclusive campus cultures create an environment where LGBTIQ+ staff and students know they will be safe, valued and accepted, enhancing individual wellbeing. This in turn leads to increased engagement and career satisfaction, and more open and respectful relationships with colleagues and peers, all of which contributes to higher performance of the University.

Confidentiality

Transgender and gender diverse individuals have the right to be who they are without unnecessary disclosure of medical or personal information. An individual's right to privacy is to be  respected throughout the gender affirmation/transition process. Any staff member who is privy to a student or staff members transgender status, including any health information, must take steps to safeguard such information. Remember that:

  • Disclosure should not be made without the individual's permission
  • USC may require proof of identity for verification purposes, however evidence of gender affirmation surgery or treatment is never a requirement

Initial conversation

Transitioning individuals are encouraged to contact their manager or student support person confidentially so that the necessary support is provided for a successful transition at USC.

Below are some key points for your consideration:

  • LGBTIQ community members are protected under the Sex Discrimination Act 1984 (Cth)and USC polices, including but not limited to the Equity and Diversity Governing Policy and Discrimination and Harassment Governing Policies.
  • USC  values diversity and recognises that being transgender has nothing to do with an individual's ability to undertake their studies or perform their job
  • The individual will direct the transition plan
  • Managers and/or student support staff will support the transition plan
  • Confidentiality will always be upheld, includes not prematurely disclosing the individual's transition
  • Respectfully ask the individual if they expect to change their name. If so, ask what name and pronouns the individual will use and when others should begin using them
  • Inform the individual of USC’s support services, such as Student Wellbeing
  • Discuss any specific study and/or work-related questions the individual may have

Transition planning

Support

Ensuring successful transition at USC requires thoughtful planning on the part of the transitioning individual and their support and advocacy network. Members of this network may include, but are not limited to, manager, student support person, a member of Human Resources,  a member of Student Wellbeing, a trusted member of the Ally Network, Student Guild representative/s or Pride Club  Peer Leader. As a manager or student support person, you provide support and guidance to the transitioning staff member or student. It is recommended that a confidential transition plan is developed together, in advance of the transition date, if possible. The individual directs the plan to assist in informing the timing of communication to others. The plan is a useful framework for managing the transition process.

Additional Information for supporting USC Staff and Students is available Here.

Information for colleagues and peers

Name and pronouns

It is essential to respect your transgender or gender diverse peers, and the way you can do this is by using their preferred name and pronoun. Pronouns (text) are basically words used to refer to a person other than their name. An individual may prefer, ‘he,’ ‘she,’ or sometimes ‘they,’ which are all examples of commonly used pronouns. However, some individuals prefer less common ones such as Xe and Ey. ‘He and She’ pronouns are gendered, whereas They, Xe and Ey are gender neutral.

If a mistake is made, don’t make a big deal of it, apologise, and get it right next time.

The past

If you need to discuss the time before a peer’s affirmation/transition, avoid statements such as ‘when you were male/female…’ because the person may feel that they have always been their gender and are simply affirming it now.

Inappropriate questions

When asking questions about the person’s affirmation/transition or gender identity, it is inappropriate to ask about:

  • The person’s anatomy or biological gender;
  • Whether the person has or intends to have surgery;
  • Whether the person is on hormone treatment; and 
  • The person’s sexuality (sexuality is not relevant to gender identity)

If the transgender person or gender diverse person raises these issues themselves and is comfortable discussing them, that is alright. However, as a general rule, ask yourself, ‘Would I ask a cisgender person this question?’

Terminology/definitions and external resources

Terminology/definitions

Terminology is important and using inclusive terminology should always be the aim. In this guide we use the phrase ‘trans and gender diverse’ to acknowledge the many identities in the gender diversity spectrum.

Trans and gender diverse is an umbrella phrase that includes all identities within the gender identity spectrum, including (but not limited to) people who identify as transgender, transsexual, genderqueer, gender fluid, non-binary, sistergirl, brotherboy, transman, or transwoman.

It’s important to check with individuals what language they prefer. Language is always changing.

Affirmed gender means the gender that matches a person’s gender identity. For example, if a person was assigned male at birth and identifies as female, their affirmed gender is female. Not all individuals identify as either a man or woman. Affirmed gender includes people who identify as non-binary or a gender fluid identity.

Biological sex means the physical and biological characteristics that define males, females and intersex conditions.

Cisgender means that a person’s biological sex and gender expression are the same. For example, a person expresses herself as female, and is also biologically female.

Coming Out is the process through which a staff member comes to recognise and acknowledge (both to self and to others) their sexuality / gender. People with intersex variations typically find out about their status from their parents or a doctor.

Deadnaming is referring to someone as their given/previous name rather than their affirmed name. This can be done intentionally or unintentionally, however the impact is the same as the individual can feel invalidated. This is not ok as all individuals have the right to have their identity affirmed.

Gender expression    Refers to the way in which a person communicates their gender identity to others through behaviour, clothing, appearance, voice and other forms of presentation. When someone identifies as trans, their biological sex is often not the same as their gender identity or expression.

Gender (or gender identity) is the state of being a man, woman, both (e.g. bigender), neither (e.g. agender), or other gender altogether (e.g. non-binary, genderqueer, genderfluid). Gender refers to what an individual identifies with internally.

Gender Diverse People whose understanding or expression of gender does not conform to social expectations based on their sex assigned at birth.

Gender Queer: A person who identifies as a gender that is not necessarily male, female or viewed in a binary manner. Genderqueer people may identify as masculine, feminine, androgynous, bi gendered or partially male or female in varied ratios. Genderqueer people may be third gendered or reject gender roles altogether.

Gender Incongruence The distress an individual experiences because of the discrepancies between their gender identity and sex characteristics. Previously the term gender dysphoria was used, however this is now avoided as it implies that what people are feeling is a disorder.

Intersex Intersex people are born with variations in sex characteristics that are not exclusively stereotypically ‘male’ or stereotypically ‘female’, but rather a combination of both. This could include variation in chromosomes, gonads, sex hormones, or genitals.

LGBTIQ*The term “LGBTIQ with an asterisk” is meant to represent the wide diversity and fluidity of sexual orientation, sex, and/or gender identity. It includes, but is not limited to, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex and queer people.

Misgendering Describing or addressing someone using language that does not match a person’s gender identity. For people with intersex variations, this may include a presumption that they have a non-binary gender identity, just as much as an assumption that they are a man, or a woman.

Mx or Mixter Is a gender-neutral title.

Non-binary Gender Identity Someone with a gender identity other than a male or a female. There are a diverse range of non-binary gender identities and some intersex and transgender people also have non-binary gender identities.

Queer An umbrella term for a wide range of non-conforming gender identities and sexual orientations. Not all people will like the word “queer”. For some, they are reclaiming an old derogatory term. For others it still has a negative connotation.

Outing Disclosure of an LGBTIQ+ person’s sexual orientation, gender identity or intersex status without their consent.

Sexuality/Sexual Orientation Sexuality refers to sexual feelings, thoughts, attractions towards other people. Sexual orientation may mean a person’s emotional, sexual orientation towards: a) persons of the same sex or b) persons of a different sex or c) persons of the same sex and persons of a different sex or d) persons of neither sex.

Sistergirls: Aboriginal transgender women who have a unique cultural identity which not only encompasses gender but also tradition, spirituality and religion. Many sistergirls live a traditional lifestyle and may take on female roles in their community such as caring for family and children.

Transgender (or trans) means that a person does not identify with the biological sex they were assigned at birth.

Transitioning is the process by which a person changes their gender expression to better match their gender identity.

A medical transition is the process by which a person changes their physical sex characteristics via hormonal intervention and/or surgery to more closely align with their gender identity.

A social transition is the process of making others aware of one’s gender identity, changing name and pronoun in social settings, and changing gender expression.

External resources

National

Queensland

Victoria

New South Wales

Contact

This guide has been developed to aid individuals who may wish to or are in the process of affirming their gender, as well as their managers and/or student support staff. It advocates the use of a well-developed transition plan based on mutual respect. It is outside the scope of these guidelines to provide detailed advice relating to specific situations or circumstance, however as a living document it will be revised as legal and procedural advancements occur.

For more information or any feedback on this document, please contact Access and Diversity at Diversity@usc.edu.au.

Acknowledgements

Equity colleagues at Deakin University, Curtin University, Griffith University, The University of Queensland and the Queensland Human Rights Commission for their collegiality and sharing of resources to assist in the development of this guide.

  • Deakin Gender Affirmation Guide; Gender Affirmation Plan (Staff); Gender Affirmation Plan (Students)

  • Curtin University Gender Transition at Curtin University

  • Griffith University Guidelines for Supporting Gender Affirmation/Transitioning in the Workplace

  • UQ Guide to Supporting Gender Transition/Affirmation in the Workplace

  • Queensland Human Rights Commission Trans @ School; Trans @ Work